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Author Topic: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)  (Read 102501 times)

lala

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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #495 on: March 07, 2014, 07:13:01 PM »

http://www.newspressnow.com/life/st_joe_live/music/article_eb1931b7-0ce6-5330-9541-c7a7bb1a0097.html

Songs that capture a generation

Posted: Thursday, March 6, 2014 11:55 pm | Updated: 2:31 pm, Fri Mar 7, 2014.
By Shea Conner | St. Joe Live | 0 comments

Every now and then, we're allowed to run off with a really crazy concept for an article here at St. Joe Live. Well, this one was certainly crazy. It was also frustrating, thought-provoking and darn near impossible.
For this story, we asked local musicians, writers and those close to the music scene — of all ages and backgrounds — one simple question: "What song from your generation best captures your generation?"
Maybe it was foolish and pretentious of us to think there are songs that embody an entire swath of very different individuals. Actually, it is. But the point of this question was to generate a discussion that would help fill in the musical generation gaps and get people to bust or confirm stereotypes about their own generations. It also would allow people to opine about their peers and essentially create a very meaningful setlist influenced by history and sociology.
The results were, well, not what we expected.
Most simply didn't respond. Some said they'd give it some thought before ultimately choosing not to retort. Some answered the question with little or no elaboration. Some answered the question by not answering the question, and some were offended that we posed such a query in the first place.
But, ultimately, a brave few picked one song that they felt best summed up their formative era. We are saluting those intrepid souls by printing their contributions, as well as our own takes on this whole generational anthem thing. What we learned was that young music fans thought a lot about this, '90s kids almost unanimously crowned Nirvana and people who grew up in the '60s and '70s didn't even bother trying to narrow it down. Take a look.

Shea Conner, St. Joe Live writer

The Millennial Generation (or Generation Y) has often been described in labels that aren't so flattering. We're arrogant. We're weak. We're lazy. We're self-obsessed. At least that's how our older peers have often defined us.
Frankly, I just don't think they know us that well.
We're not arrogant. We're confident. Maybe it's because we grew up watching rappers, rockers and professional athletes make their boastful declarations with an utter lack of remorse. Or maybe it's because confidence plays a key role in achieving career aspirations and it's been pounded into our heads by nearly every authority figure we've met since we were teenagers.
We're not weak. We're impressionable, compassionate and open-minded. My generation was the first to be raised with an entire world at its fingertips, and we've absorbed various types of culture, art, history and silly Internet things like a sponge. What we lack in wisdom, we make up for with increasing self-awareness and eagerness.
We're not lazy. We're not self-obsessed. We're dreamers who have been encouraged to never stop chasing their aspirations. In an intimidating world that's overwhelmingly connected, economically baffling and full of uncertainty, my generation has placed a greater value in the pursuit of happiness. Perhaps that's why MGMT's "Time to Pretend" will always make such a lasting impression on me.
"I'm feelin' rough, I'm feelin' raw, I'm in the prime of my life. Let's make some music, make some money, find some models for wives." From the very first lines of the song, MGMT's Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser set out to establish a feeling of invincibility and optimism as they fantasize about becoming rockstar folk heroes. As the title "Time to Pretend" implies, the song is a daydream, but the duo makes you feel as if that daydream is never quite out of reach.
"Yeah, it's overwhelming, but what else can we do? Get jobs in offices and wake up for the morning commute?" We've seen previous generations immerse themselves in jobs that were just that — jobs. So many people have locked themselves up in occupational prisons because the money was good. In the past, security defined success. That's not the case anymore. Our generation whole-heartedly believes that if you can make a living by doing something deeply rewarding, you've already prospered.
Throughout the rest of the song, MGMT laments about feelings of inadequacy and false idolization while also fondly recalling authentic love. I find this quite poignant because, as I age, I'm learning that it's not about how cool people think I am or the number of Facebook friends I have that's meaningful, but rather the lasting relationships I'm making. That's tough to grasp in this new world that places more stock in the quantity of kinships rather than the quality.
Even the music of "Time to Pretend" feels unique to the time period. It's a mix of electronic dance with big strokes of psychedelia, pop and garage rock. Like so much of the great music of this era, it's a display of today's technological influence while also serving as a nod to the past. Honestly, why would we want to ignore such amazing influences?
In the end, the protagonists find that their dreams weren't all they were cracked up to be. They were inevitably "fated to pretend." More than anything, "Time to Pretend" details a crash with reality and the fact that nothing comes easy. That's something we're still largely struggling to deal with, but MGMT gave us fair warning.
Either that, or it's just a song about a bunch of arrogant, weak, lazy, self-obsessed losers who won't grow the hell up.
Andrew Gaug, St. Joe Live writer
Speaking for Generation Y, I'd go with Outkast's "Hey Ya," not only because it was one of the best (and most played) songs of the '00s, but because it captured the feelings of the generation so well.
Taking it on a facetious level, it's a super fun tune with its Beatles-like melody, call-and-response, two-word chorus and funky dance breakdown. Despite its sunny demeanor, it's a song about chasing thrills and the inevitable emptiness associated with the fact that there's no emotional investment.
In our budding and then full-blown Internet age, you could find something for any specific thrill that you were seeking out. It was unlike anything any previous generation experienced.
Even though technology brought more stimulation, we still proved to be an unhappy generation (hence, the emo movement of the 2000s, with its overbearing and often juvenile lyrics), but we were afraid to show that on the surface.
If you saw us on the street, we appeared happy. If you looked at our AOL Instant Messenger or Myspace profiles or read our texts and personal e-mail, there was a sense of longing for something deeper.
Underneath the cheery facade of "Hey Ya," there's a feeling of darkness that could easily be overlooked if you didn't take the time to actually invest yourself in the material.
Happy people could just ignore the lyrics and like Andre 3000 says, "Y'all don't want to hear me, you just want to dance." While those that dug deeper saw questions like "If what they say is/'Nothing lasts forever'/then what makes/love the exception?"
"Hey Ya," like our generation, played both sides of the fence -- endearingly happy, while frustrated underneath as it learned the old adage that what comes easy doesn't last. At some point, you have to get out of the Caddy and meet the person's daddy. It's something we're still learning.
Kevin Krauskopf, former St. Joe Live writer
I've found this to be an almost impossible question to answer. By the time I started high school in 1998, the popularity of bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and the Smashing Pumpkins was no longer at its peak. Rap/metal happened, briefly, and then the Blink-182s of the music world took over — and were any of them good enough to carry the mantle for an entire generation?
No. No, they weren't.
But then one particular artist popped into my head. Dave Grohl. I almost immediately dismissed him as too obvious a choice, but who else better bridges the gap between generations for those of us who don't particularly identify with any one of them?
Far from my favorite song in the Foo Fighters catalog, "Learn to Fly" still nails it on what it was like to come of age in the late '90s and early '00s. As Shea put it, the Digital Revolution changed everything — and us 20- and 30-somethings were shoved from the plane without a parachute into this rapidly evolving world.
Fortunately, we learned to fly before we crashed and burned. We had to find our own way — older generations no better understood this new world than us — and it took some time. Maybe that's why we came off at first as brash, arrogant and narcissistic. With the world quite literally a click away in this digital era, however, we were exposed to so many different ways of thinking. We also saw more clearly, and came to detest, the harsh oppression of those who didn't conform. Thus, we gave up on the "make your own way" ideal, embraced our differences and decided our best way forward is together.
And that's why Grohl's line "Fly along with me, I can't quite make it alone / Try to make this life my own" resonates so deeply.
Corey Riley, Blue Oyster Culture Club
Hands down, Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit." No other song has made an entire basement full of stinking pubescent teenagers stop and actually listen. It changed everything.
Amy Heath, co-owner of The Lucky Tiger
I was smack dab in the middle of Gen X. It was a generation that only had top 40 stations, and if you wanted to hear something different, you traded tapes and sent away for a whole label's discography. It was the fall of my sophomore year when "Smells Like Teen Spirit" hit and it seemed like everything changed overnight.
I would say it really was the anthem for my particular generation, and even though it is not what represents me personally or my favorite, that is THE song. I cannot see much argument on this if you went to high school in the early- to mid-'90s.
Danny Phillips, local music critic
For me, as I stare hard at 40, Nirvana's "Negative Creep" from their debut "Bleach" speaks to my generation. Most would probably go to "Teen Spirit," but for me, when I heard "Negative Creep" it described me and where I was at the time: It was dark, had a heavy riff and, above all, it was pissed off.
Nirvana came along at a perfect time for me and "Negative Creep" was the song that lit my fuse. When I think of my youth, think about days gone by that have shaped me, it's "Negative Creep" setting the scene of the movie.
Todd Ward, The GasTown Lamps
"Fell In Love With a Girl" by The White Stripes and "Last Night" by The Strokes. Those bands kicked off a resurgence of rock in the early 2000s and put the final death nail in rap metal. The influence of that era is still reverberating throughout music, both underground and mainstream.
Matthew Coman, The Wood Pile
I want to pick a song that most people would be aware of, but I keep coming back to a song called "Here" by VAST. That was during a very formative time in my life. I was 15 when I first heard this band.
The song, to me, is about feeling a state of paralysis when being bombarded with information. I think it's an analysis of the digital age, and the feeling of not knowing what to believe. At the same time that it speaks to this paralysis, it also speaks to the feeling of joy for living in a time that is sort of chaotic. You're not sure who or what to trust, but you're happy you're along for the ride. This band really left an impression on me.
Ryan Richardson, DJ and writer for The Joplin Globe
I was just off the cusp of being part of the vaunted Generation X that seemed to epitomize cool when I was a teenager. The millennials, in their short time here, have already become alien to me to the point I don't relate to their values. Born in 1981, I land squarely in the middle of the lost Generation Y.
My generation is pulled into two different directions. We're the ones buying up vinyl records because they epitomized our childhood and then disappeared with it too. We're the ones who embraced the computer age with open arms and wide wonder because that technology matured with us. We were too young to be completely cynical like our Gen X counterparts who had worked under the assumption that they could expect less than their parents. But we're too old to be blissfully ignorant of the squandered potential of all the technology and information that had finally been placed within our grasp. We're dutiful wanderers née slackers, with no direction home.
The single "1979" off of The Smashing Pumpkins double LP "Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness" was credibly the first taste of that aimless feeling that I never have been able to shake since. Four years earlier, Cobain had screamed "Here we are now, entertain us" and Billy Corgan responded in earnest by giving us the justification on why we were so listless in the first place.
This song didn't feature the soft verse, loud chorus we had been groomed to expect during the rise and fall of grunge. This was the same, steady drumbeat from start to finish. It was Corgan, speaking on our behalf while speaking to us at the same time, flashing us soft-spoken realizations that no direction still put us at the same place as everyone before and after us. The song was a heartbeat, keeping perfect time until the end until it evaporated leaving nothing behind. We were told it was going to be ok to be vacant and bored, while residing in the land of 1000 guilts.
Corgan and his bandmates were poster boys for late Generation X'ers, but in this song he bridged the gap to his younger siblings and told us it was OK to not expect it all to work out. When the Baby Boomers looked down their noses at them citing squandered potential, they were looking to us with an encouraging nod. They were saying that they still believed we could figure it out.
And if even if we didn't immediately, everything would still be there when we did.
Steven Garcia, Deco Auto
"Where the Streets Have No Name" by U2 from "The Joshua Tree."
First, the sheer poetry of the lyrics: "I want to reach out and touch the flame. Where the streets have no name. Ah! Ah! Ah!"
Hmm... OK. That's not so great. How 'bout this: "We're still building then burning down love. Burning down love. And when I go there, I go there with you. It's all I can do."
No, that's pretty bad too. In fact, it's pretty damn awful. So why this song?
Well, this won't speak for everyone in Generation X, only those of us who hoped and prayed for something just a tiny, itty-bit different than what everyone else was listening to.
For us Midwestern Generation X-ers who weren't digging on classic rock, hair metal or Top 40 in the '80s, there wasn't much else as an alternative. There was some really underground stuff, but it was hard to find and difficult to purchase. So, we mostly contented ourselves with what little major labels had to offer. It was fairly decent. We had Depeche Mode and The Cure, The Replacements and Soul Asylum, R.E.M. and The Smithereens. And of course, we had U2.
In 1987, it had already been seven years since their debut "Boy" (and only liars said they knew it when it came out). It had been four long years since their last really crucial album "War." By the late '80s, U2 had already become fairly commonplace, and really, quite boring. The first two singles off "The Joshua Tree" ("With or Without You" and "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For") did little to change that opinion. Moms were clearly enjoying this record!
Finally, they released "Where the Streets Have No Name" and it sounded positively punk by comparison. Of course, that's obvious hyperbole, but the drums were pounding, the bass was thunking and Bono gave his best impersonation of someone who cared. And for those of us stuck in Northwest Missouri, if the choice was between a mock-edgy single by U2, or something by Poison, we gladly went with the former.
It wasn't groundbreaking. It wasn't mind-expanding. It wasn't even all that exciting. But it wasn't bad, and that was pretty good.
Bob Shultz, Missouri Music Hall of Fame
I've got to go with Todd Snider's “Talkin' Seattle Grunge Rock Blues.”
It's the Folk-Alt-Rock-Americana comedic journey of a group of guys trying to make in the record industry on the heels of Nirvana.
Snider perfectly captures the time and place of that weird, brief chapter of the recording industry where everyone seemingly drops the leather-clad pants and tosses on the flannel for a chance at stardom.
The song follows this group of untalented musicians as they wind through the final days of MTV when MTV actually played music — that time when anyone and their untalented brother was getting their own “Unplugged” specials in between “Real World” marathons.
It so defines Generation X-ers who were using the growing Internet technology, and not really saying anything.
Snider's chorus refrain from Neil Young's “Into the Blue and Into the Black” puts the story firmly into "tongue-in-cheek" territory. It brilliantly highlights and predicts the coming storm of post-Seattle bands that would lead the rock genre for the next decade. Take out the fictional band and replace it with "Smashing Pumpkins," "Creed," or "Nickelback" and it is a fairly accurate attack on the lameness of the coming storm of music and my generation's ability to put them there.
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lala

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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #496 on: March 20, 2014, 06:33:38 PM »

I often find myself scratching my head when bands are compared to MGMT because I just don't get the comparisons.  I know that many of you disagree with me about EOTS-I think they're a cheap rip off, but some of my very fave people love them, so I won't bash them further.  Anyway, I enjoy Foster (I hate Pumped Up Kicks) but for very different reasons that I like MGMT.  I understand the sort of crossover comparison in this article and I think it has a couple of interesting tidbits, so I'm posting it. 

http://www.stereogum.com/1670848/the-week-in-pop-the-mis-mgmt-of-foster-the-people/franchises/the-week-in-pop/

The Week In Pop: The Mis-MGMT Of Foster The People
Mar 20th '14 by Chris DeVille

Every few years, a musician achieves that rare combination of commercial dominance and critical acclaim — and therefore inspires lots of copycats — only to willfully retreat from the spotlight. This usually involves making an album designed to alienate mainstream audiences and/or distance the originator from the imitators. It also tends to create a vacuum into which those imitators can leap, allowing them to bask in commercial success for a while until everyone stops searching for “the new _____.” Nirvana and Pearl Jam attempted this maneuver in 1993 with the abrasive In Utero and the video-free Vs. respectively, clearing the way for Stone Temple Pilots, Live, and Bush to satiate the public’s bubblegrunge hunger. When Radiohead famously muffled Thom Yorke’s heavenly falsetto and handcuffed Jonny Greenwood’s spastic six-string theatrics on 2000′s Kid A, the world had no shortage of potential “new Radioheads” to choose from. And when constant hitmaker Kanye West flipped the digital middle finger that was Yeezus last year, urban radio programmers found workable substitutes in Yeezy facsimiles such as Big Sean and J. Cole.

MGMT’s Oracular Spectacular was the sort of world-conquering unanimous favorite you rarely see anymore, an album that crossed over from alt-rock channels to produce three inescapable pop hits, each of which also cracked the Pazz & Jop critics’ poll’s top 50. (The album itself finished in the critics’ top 20.) MGMT’s psych-tinged dance-pop was everywhere — on the radio, at dance parties, in seemingly every ad on TV. But when the duo decided to muffle its formidable pop powers on 2010 follow-up Congratulations in favor of an insular psych and post-punk odyssey, there was an opportunity for MGMT clones to run rampant on the pop charts. Some of them (Empire Of The Sun) were more palatable than others (Capital Cities). Some (STRFKR) took over for MGMT in the TV sync department but couldn’t replicate their chart success; others (Portugal. The Man) broke at alternative radio but couldn’t crack the top 40. You could make a good case that Oracular Spectacular paved the way for the embrace of Passion Pit and Vampire Weekend beyond their original niche audience. But no one seized the post-MGMT moment quite like Foster The People.



Mark Foster was literally writing commercial jingles for a living when he concocted “Pumped Up Kicks,” an incandescent morsel of programming department catnip that became for 2011 what “Time To Pretend,” “Electric Feel,” and “Kids” were for 2008. It was expertly engineered to dominate that marginally psychedelic, synth-driven pop-rock niche that MGMT had vacated, all the way down to its nonsensical lyrics about children. Peaking at #3 on the Hot 100 singles chart, “Pumped Up Kicks” was a pop cultural money train that even Foster’s historically awkward SNL stage presence couldn’t derail. (To be genealogically fair, “Pumped Up Kicks” also leaned heavily on the breezy lightness of Peter Bjorn And John’s whistlin’ wonder “Young Folks,” another song you could run from but couldn’t hide from at the height of indie gentrification.) Alas, the song also marked Foster The People as a surefire one-hit wonder. Torches, the eminently acceptable album anchored by “Pumped Up Kicks,” yielded four other singles, but only one of them cracked the Hot 100 singles chart. That song, “Don’t Stop (Color On The Walls),” only made it to #86.

If you can remember Foster The People’s second performance on SNL at all, you’re more likely to remember that Kenny G joined them than you are to recall which song they played. (That’d be “Houdini,” a song that lived up to its name by quickly disappearing from radio playlists without a trace.) Still, on the strength of “Pumped Up Kicks” alone, Foster The People became a name brand bankable enough to pack 5,000-capacity venues and appear near the top of the Coachella poster on the same line as commercial powerhouses such as Pharrell, Lorde, Skrillex, and Queens Of The Stone Age (and above MGMT, incidentally). Thus, now comes Supermodel, a sophomore album carrying a weight of expectations it can’t possibly begin to shoulder.

Like Torches before it, Supermodel is sleek, shiny, and professional in every way. That state-of-the-art veneer is no doubt partially due to the continued involvement of British producer Paul Epworth, who got his start producing mid-aughts dance-punk blokes like Bloc Party and the Futureheads then ascended the ranks until Adele’s 21 made him one of pop’s most in-demand guiding lights. Epworth is now the guy you bring in if, like U2, you’re a rock band vying to be a commercial powerhouse in a climate when almost no rock bands pull that kind of weight. “I promised I would rid the world of feral animals,” Foster sings on the surprisingly shoegazey “Pseudologia Fantastica,” but Epworth is just as likely the one shaving down the teeth here.



And you can be sure that Supermodel is an album without bite, one built to placate the lowest common denominator and keep Foster swimming in licensing money. That’s not to say it lacks ideas. When Foster isn’t directly milking the old MGMT sound on tracks like “Nevermind” and “Best Friend,” he does experiment here and there. “A Beginner’s Guide To Destroying The Moon” borrows Clams Casino’s beat from A$AP Rocky’s “LVL,” but the song Foster builds on top of it is even more of a slog than Rocky’s. “Goats In Trees” is a uniquely bleary ballad haunted by stirring ghostly samples, but also by Foster’s less than stellar vocal performance. The Beatlesesque choral arrangement on the interlude “The Angelic Welcome Of Mr. Jones” is beautiful but fleeting, and a stab at replicating Vampire Weekend’s pan-global pop-rock on opener “Are You What You Want To Be?” turns out better than it has any right to. Only the aforementioned shoegaze turn on “Pseudologia Fantastica” suggests a fascinating way forward, but even that could pass for a hazy rewrite of “Weekend Wars.”

But Foster is far better at setting a mood than he is at writing timeless pop songs. He can keep deploying his trusty “Electric Feel” gang vocals to shroud his own vocal weaknesses (and on the grating “Ask Yourself,” he really should have), but all those voices can’t hide the absence of a melody as indelible as “Pumped Up Kicks.” Thus, he ends up with singles like “Coming Of Age,” a ditty with all the ingratiating propulsion of “Kicks” but no substance to latch onto. It stalled out short of the Hot 100 and feels more like arrested development than a coming of age. The main difference between timeless pop music and soulless product is a genuine spark of inspiration, and that tends to run out when you’re riding someone else’s coattails. The artists that manage to get out of somebody else’s shadow are the ones who find their own identities — say what you want about Muse, but don’t say they sound like Radiohead anymore. Foster The People make some half-hearted attempts at such reinvention on Supermodel, but mostly they sound like they’re trying their hardest to be the band MGMT is doing their damnedest not to be.

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Fairytale of Hurt

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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #497 on: March 20, 2014, 06:39:25 PM »

That last sentence is pretty powerful.
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lala

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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #498 on: March 21, 2014, 04:53:03 PM »

You know what?  I didn't hate it. I think it's exaggerated because I don't think they put that much effort but I didn't hate it
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #499 on: June 27, 2014, 07:24:21 AM »

A quickie with MGMT's lead singer about their upcoming trip to South Africa
2014-06-27 07:00
by Alex Isaacs

Cape Town – In case you missed it, MGMT are coming to South Africa for two festivals later this year.

We were offered the opportunity to speak to the lead singer of the Grammy-award-winning band: Andrew VanWyngarden while the electronic rockers are on tour in Eastern Europe.

He told us about his influences, what touristy things he's looking forward to doing in mzansi and explained the video for one of their latest singles.

Channel24:
We’re so excited for your first shows on South African soil at Vodacom in The City and Rocking the Daisies this October.

Are there any fun activities that you have planned other than rocking the stage, like shark cage diving or something crazy?

Andrew:
I’m excited and really happy (to be playing in South Africa).

That’s the first question everyone has been asking us (laughs) not specifically shark cage diving though. I would like to do that! Let’s do it!

Channel24:
You’ve played music festivals from Glastonbury to Coachella, what do you like about festival shows and why say yes to festival shows in South Africa?

Andrew:
Well, we’ve never been to South Africa or even the continent of Africa so it seemed like a great trip to make and that’ll be sort-of-a once in a lifetime experience or maybe it’s not. Maybe we’ll come back, that would be cool too.

I’ve heard so much about it through surfing and I don’t know, just excited to check it out, have a new experience. (Sic)

Channel24:
We love your tweets with different music videos, which artists inspired your latest self-titled album, MGMT?

Andrew:
Oh man, so many so many different ones...I think in terms of the kind of layers of sound on the latest album it’s kind-of influenced by a lot of early 90s bands like AR Cane and this English band called Disco Inferno.

I think both those bands do this multi layered...non standard way of making chords and we’re using a lot of analogue synthesizers, there’s this one called the Phoenix and other bands who use it like Aphex Twin and some other electronic artists (have been influential).

Channel24:
One of your latest singles, off that album, Cool Song 2 has a beautiful video that we love. Could you tell us more about it, what’s the story behind it?

Andrew:
It’s different from any other video that we’ve had. The director Isaiah Seret he came up with the story line after we went back and forth a bit but it was really his idea.

I think it’s kind of like a love story that takes the form of this weird disease happening. This guy turning into a tree and this other guy trying to save him. I think it’s really cool, (it’s a shame) that we weren’t actually at the shoot because we got to film at this beautiful place in Los Angeles where this guy doesn’t usually let people film.

Yeah, all in all it has a pretty unsettling vibe but it fits the song so well (sic).

And that’s it for our quickie, thanks Andrew.

Here's all the information you need about the MGMT shows in South Africa. http://www.channel24.co.za/Music/News/Rocking-the-Daisies-announces-big-international-headliner-20140624

http://www.channel24.co.za/Music/News/A-quickie-with-MGMTs-lead-singer-about-their-upcoming-trip-to-South-Africa-20140626
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #500 on: July 07, 2014, 09:40:48 AM »

http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a582572/opener-festival-2014-live-review-sensible-option-for-british-fans.html#~oJl7zCaOrItN93

MGMT's main stage slot, meanwhile, is a sun-drenched marriage made in heaven, the woozy, dappled psychedelia of second album Congratulations floating out like a gorgeously gauzy dream, while even the inevitable roars of approval for 'Kids' and 'Electric Feel' don't seem quite as depressingly out of sync as on UK turf.



Read more: http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a582572/opener-festival-2014-live-review-sensible-option-for-british-fans.html#~oJl7zCaOrItN93#ixzz36nGRcXXu
Follow us: @digitalspy on Twitter | digitalspyuk on Facebook
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #501 on: August 17, 2014, 06:52:06 AM »

http://www.timeslive.co.za/entertainment/music/2014/08/14/music-will-grow-with-you-and-you-can-t-stay-the-same-mgmt

Music will grow with you and you can't stay the same: MGMT
Nikita Ramkissoon | 14 August, 2014 11:09

Call their sound synth-punk, electro-pop, or Cynthia. MGMT don't give a bleep, writes Nikita Ramkissoon


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Music will grow with you and you can't stay the same: MGMT
Nikita Ramkissoon | 14 August, 2014 11:09

DEEPLY FLOORED: Ben Goldwasser, left, and Andrew Van Wyngarden
Image by: GALLO/GETTY IMAGES
Call their sound synth-punk, electro-pop, or Cynthia. MGMT don't give a bleep, writes Nikita Ramkissoon

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In 2007, Facebook and MySpace changed the science of music marketing forever. That year, the American duo MGMT - keyboardist Ben Goldwasser and singer-guitarist Andrew Van Wyngarden - were among the first bands to surf the social-media wave with their hit debut album, Oracular Spectacular .

MGMT's rapid rise to indie fame was an early textbook example of the power of the viral music video - though they say it was a phenomenon beyond their control.

" When we found out that this was how people were discovering our music, we didn't have a clue how it worked - but it did, " says Goldwasser, on the line from Croatia.

The band's third album, simply titled MGMT, was released last year. In October they will tour South Africa, playing Vodacom In The City at Johannesburg's Mary Fitzgerald Square, and Rocking the Daisies at Cloof Wine Estate in Darling, Western Cape.

On subsequent albums they were joined in studio by band members Matthew Asti, James Richardson and Will Berman.

The big hits on Oracular Spectacular - Kids , Time to Pretend and Electric Feel - are still dancefloor fixtures in South African clubs.
"We've changed a lot since then" says Goldwasser. "But those songs still ring true to what we were at the time."

In 2010, the boys from Connecticut released their second offering, Congratulations. "Writing a follow-up to something so successful is hard," says Goldwasser.

"You are going to be judged. People are anticipating what you're going to do, wondering what's going to follow. The critics are armed and ready, and it's easy to get caught up in the critical backlash - so we needed to follow our gut on the next one."

Congratulations, although not as commercially successful as Oracular Spectacular, was critically acclaimed. Goldwasser attributes this to not sticking to a formula.

"We don't have a style," he says. "It's rock, synth, indie, pop. Whatever it may be, the important thing is that it is its own beast.

"We grow as musicians and as people, so naturally - if you're writing from a place of honesty - the music will grow with you and you can't stay the same.

"I've got some punk influences - the fringe of punk, really. Not Ramones punk. I also like electro like Aphex Twin.

"There's no distinction between genres when I listen to music, because what sounds good to me sounds good to me.

"I draw from what I know, and I'm sure it's the same for the rest of the band. We've got no interest in honing in on any specific style.

"It's not like we're trying to be obscure or anything. I guess MGMT just wants to challenge what's acceptable in music."

"We're so excited to be coming to South Africa," says Goldwasser. "We've wanted to for so long ." LS
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #502 on: September 24, 2014, 05:11:01 AM »

It's super cute how excited Peru is.  While their are a couple of items in here that aren't presented quite correctly, they aren't actually mistakes.  ;)



 http://www.andina.com.pe/Ingles/noticia-mgmt-set-for-firstever-peru-gig-in-november-524544.aspx
 
 
18:11. Lima, Sept. 23. United States' foremost psychedelic indie-rock band, MGMT, are coming to Lima this November for performing their first-ever concert in Peru, it was reported Tuesday.

Best known for worldwide famous hits such as "Electric Feel", "Time To Pretend" and "Weekend Wars”, MGMT will be taking to the stage on 4th November at Lima's Parque de la Exposición, the event organizers announced in a press release Thursday.

Along with Benjamin Goldwasser and Matt Asti on guitar and bass; James Richardson, on drums and with their acclaimed lead singer and lyricist Andrew VanWyngarden, the Brooklyn’s outfit confirmed the news via their official facebook.

Thus, they will be playing in front of their Peruvian fans for first time ever joined by Hank Sullivant on guitar and keyboards and Will Berman on percussion and harmonica.

MGMT's Peru show will be part of the band's ongoing world tour, in support of their 3rd self-titled studio album released in September last year.

The upcoming show is organized by Movistar. Tickets for the Nov. 4 concert will be available for Movistar clients ranging from 150 soles to 185 soles while price for general public worth 250 soles.
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #503 on: October 21, 2014, 10:02:25 PM »

This is meant to be an article about Foxygen, but the author got a bit sidetracked.  I figured it was worthy of a post.
http://www.allvoices.com/article/100001632

Foxygen’s "...And Star Power" isn't necessarily the album people want, but it’s the album we need.

In early 2013 Foxygen released their breakthrough record “We are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Love and Magic”, a brilliant neo-psychedelic/stoner rock album that brought nostalgia to an era the lead singer Sam France (24) and multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Rado (24) never lived. The two have been playing music together since their early days of high school, making various EP’s which often came out sounding like a pre-pubescent mix of Captain Beefheart meets Guided by Voices. The most prominent of these was “Jurassic Exxplosion Phillipic” an album that has 36 tracks, none of which go over 3:26. In May of 2011 they released “Take the Kids off Broadway”, which was re-released by Jagjaguwar in 2012 as their studio debut (although some will argue “Exxplosion” was their first Full-length). “Broadway” brought the revival of the late 60’s and early 70’s most prolific Rock N’ Roll tenants. Echoes of Mick Jagger, The Doors and Pink Floyd, had they been modern DIY artists, bled through the duos songs. Foxygen’s moderate hype train picked up momentum heading into early 2013 when “21st Century” was released to favorable reviews, and alluring write-ups from some of the world’s biggest music blogs. The band started to develop a sufficient amount of buzz; unfortunately it also came with its negative aspects as it so often does. A now former band member (as well as ex-girlfriend of France) Elizabeth Fey blogged about the bands fractured relationship online. Claiming there was resentment between Rado and France, due to Rado’s predominant behavior, among other things. There also were on-stage meltdowns from France, including one that resulted in a major injury. Yet after a turbulent year the band was able to put things aside. Whether there truly was exhibited tension or whether Fey had developed a bit of a Yoko Ono Syndrome, has stayed ambiguous, but none-the-less the group continued forward and on October 14th released their newest LP. After the success of their prior release the band could’ve gone right for the mainstream, but instead bowed out to take listeners on the transcendental mind fuck that is “…And Star Power”

This wasn't the first time in recent history a band with accessible tunes failed to continue in that trend. Back in 2010 the Neo-Psychedlic/electro-pop duo from Brooklyn MGMT released their sophomore album “Congratulations” to a widely disgruntled and, for a lack of a better word, confused audience. Over the previous two to three years MGMT had exploded onto the music scene with freakishly catchy electro-psych-dance songs. Songs such as “Time to Pretend” and “Kids” were everywhere from motion picture trailers to sports stadiums, from Williamsburg hipsters, to Tempe frat boys. So when the band ditched the sound that made them the most popular buzz band of the late 00’s to become a five piece rock band making a more visceral release then one that appeased the masses, it was bashed by critics and audiences alike. People expected MGMT to follow up with their Grammy nominated sound, but instead they made a self-indulgent “rock” album.

What people failed to realize was that MGMT never intended to be rock stars, there aesthetic while catchy and colorful, were also completely satirical of contemporary pop music. “Congratulations” is an incredibly underrated release; it hasn't exactly reached cult classic level like some people initially thought it might, though it’s still a benchmark in the sense that it showed a popular rock band, signed from their college dorms to Columbia records, could still have integrity. Even with the constant pressure from their label to make more commercially inclined music.

Foxygen’s situation is not nearly as extreme. They haven’t been so universally coveted; they aren't on a major label and though exoteric, probably weren't being played at your local Sigma Chi house last summer. Although they easily could’ve sold-out and made incredibly catchy pop songs. The kind that you'd find  during a montage on some CBS comedy. So instead they differed and went completely bat-shit out of left field. Redeeming that pre-pubescent Neo-Beefheart sound from “Exxplosion”, and by adding bits of Todd Rundgren, Iggy Pop, and The Kinks to the mix you have “…And Star Power”. “Star Power” is a 24 track extravaganza that seems to contain every ounce of material France and Rado have drawn up over the last two years. Upon first listen it’s a bit of a mess. The band holds together quite well for the first five tracks before breaking off into a series of instrumentals that all almost seem like they were demos that never got completed. The grooves are killer, but you wish they would've been a little more anthropomorphic. This happens a few more times, “Hot Summer” has a Carousel ride from hell feel too it, as the band does its best Suicide impression and tracks “Can’t Contextualize My Mind” and “Talk” feel like they were uncompleted cuts for The Stooges during the “Fun House” era. As with arguably every double album, aside from maybe The Rolling Stones “Exile on Main St.”, there are a few straight-up throwaway tracks, “Cold Winter/Freedom” is a terribly un-captivating 6:14 you could do without and there certainly is no need for a mini sequel in “Freedom II”.

Despite a few songs that drag a little beyond necessity and an album that as a whole feels like a Kandinsky painting, there are some absolute gems. “Coulda Been My Love” with its female choir backed harmonies and soothing guitar shriek fills, is the slow dance at a prom in a parallel universe. It’s followed by the brilliant opiate induced love song “Cosmic Vibrations”. The band also has its fair share of high tempo jams as well, “Matress Warehouse” feels like the opening title montage for a seventies buddy cop film and “Brooklyn Police Station” starts out sounding like a Roky Erickson jam that eventually breaks down to a Haight-Ashbury afternoon in the park, where everything seems to be passing you in slow motion. On first listen, or even on the first four listens it is quite overwhelming (it has taken me a week since its initial release to get a firm grasp), but if you give it some time the fluctuation between pop songs and odd instrumentals find a way to coexist.

Much like MGMT’s “difficult” second album, Foxygen will likely not be greeted well by critics, and they will be snubbed by some fans of their previous releases. The album has some disappointing moments, some songs you wish they would've inflated individually rather than the track list itself, but i'd be hard pressed to find a release these days that doesn't. Also “Star Power” serves as an important reminder to music fans that musicians are still willing to make daring pieces of art. With so many artists arriving on the scene at rampant paces audiences can often be overwhelmed, and attention spans can desecrated. In this era it’s quite easy for a band to have one unappealing release and forever fall into a bit of a purgatory. Foxygen’s album is undoubtedly self-indulgent, yet it feels that word is too often looked at with disdain. Self-Indulgence has led to some of our greatest records, “Pet Sounds”, “Kid A”, “In Utero”, David Bowie’s “Berlin” era, the list goes on. It would be hyperbolic to compare “…Star Power” to these classics, but the point is that artists should never shy away from making self -indulgent albums no matter how intense the pressure comes from fans and label heads. Some of the greatest works in audio have been made in that mindset. Foxygen’s France and Rado are two young dudes, both in their early twenties and while the ideas on this album seemed to be pulled from various terrains, they all serve as anticipation to see where this band, who've already been at it for a decade, go next.
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #504 on: November 05, 2014, 10:53:20 AM »

http://www.peruthisweek.com/news-mgmt-visits-lima-beach-with-peru-surf-champ-104377

National

MGMT visits Lima beach with Peru surf champ

Members of MGMT, the U.S. dance-rock duo, know how to select a tour guide.

Band vocalist Andrew VanWyngarden and guitarist James Richardson, whom were in Peru’s capital city to perform Tuesday at Parque de la Exposición, spent a day with Sofia Mulanovich, famed Peruvian surfer and a world champion of the sport.

On Monday, upon her Instagram account, Mulanovich posted a photo of her newfound friends and herself with the caption: “Great day with the boys of MGMT. Good waves, ceviche and a spectacular sunset”.

And really, who could ask for more?

This was the band’s first time in Peru. They were joined onstage Tuesday night by The Drums as well as Delta Venus, an Argentinian band who opened the concert.

Readers, did you go to the November 4 MGMT concert? What did you think?
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Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
« Reply #505 on: December 26, 2015, 09:42:23 AM »

So Andrew tweets and the Internet noticed. My mother used to tell me that it's better to be talked about that ignored. Anyway, NME Had only lovely things to say and are definitely ready to embrace MGMT as their darlings once again.

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MGMT Are Coming Back In 2016: Here's Why You Should Be Excited
image: http://static.nme.com/images/thumbnail/Screen_shot_2013-04-30_at_17.43.50.png


By Lisa Wright
26th December 2015
image: http://nme.assets.ipccdn.co.uk/images/mgmtpmvh080610.article_x2.jpg


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Cast your mind back to 2008. The day-glo drug disco of nu rave is slowly starting to wane as three-day come downs with only the ringing sounds of Shitdisco to keep you company start to become a bit less MDMA-zing. Leona Lewis' 'Bleeding Love' is keeping The X Factor's seemingly unstoppable chart dominancy charging ahead. The concept of the viral Youtube smash is in its infancy and 'Gangnam Style', 'Friday' and the 'Harlem Shake' are but evil glints in the internet's eye.

If you were a fan of aspirational, effervescent, psych-tinged pop bangers, however, then 2008 will mainly be remembered as the year of MGMT. The wonky, parping intro to breakthrough hit 'Time To Pretend' was everywhere and debut LP 'Oracular Spectacular' brought Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser storming into the limelight and to the top of NME's Albums of the Year poll.



The duo seemed unstoppable, but it wasn't to be. The more experimental, odd and wickedly underrated offerings of 2010's 'Congratulations' and 2013's self-titled LP failed to ignite the same commercial flame and MGMT seemed relegated to early evening festival billings forevermore.

Yesterday, however, the band sent out a festive tweet teasing a new record in 2016 and showing the kind of self-confidence that suggests the pair aren't content to sit back on the sidelines any more.



Here's what we want from Album Four and why, if they pull it off, a success could be one of 2016's best comebacks.

Pristine pop vs total weirdness


The beauty of MGMT at their finest (see: 'Electric Feel', 'Brian Eno', 'Kids') is that they splice big, bright, shimmering pop sensibilities with the kind of squelching oddness that Syd Barrett might call out as a bit strange. The tracks that haven't resonated so much with fans are the ones where the balance is off, but if Ben and Andrew can find the perfect middle ground then there's few who can match them.

Curveballs


After Nirvana had achieved ridiculous worldwide success with 'Nevermind', Kurt Cobain set about trying to write a record ('In Utero') that was angry and difficult and cast away the fairweather fans. You could argue that MGMT have followed a similar path: after the enormous success of 'Oracular Spectacular', they set about pushing their experimental, idiosyncratic sides forward and letting their psychedelic pool of influences show. MGMT were not content to just be a happy clappy pop band. Now, however, the biggest curveball they could throw would be to come back with an album full of bangers. They've shown they can write trippy, ethereal gems: now let's see the other side of them again.

Influential prowess


From Swim Deep to Yak to Superfood, you can bet that a large number of this generation's young contenders have an MGMT album or two on their record shelves. A return to form record would be not only hugely welcomed, but timely: we're hoping for somewhere in between Swim Deep's sonic collage of a second album 'Mothers' and Tame Impala's warped psych-dance LP 'Currents'.

Well-deserved recognition


Sure, it might seem like we're gunning for 'Oracular Spectacular mk II' here, but that's only 'cos we're a sucker for a pop hook. Realistically, MGMT haven't made a bad album to date. 'Congratulations' was an exciting, eclectic rattle through so many ideas you could barely keep up; 'MGMT' delved into a Pink Floyd-esque nightmare/ fantasy-scape (depending on the track), flitting between monotone drones and space-age synths with barely a pause. Together, the three records form a body of work that's inventive, playful, rule-breaking and downright fun. It'd be a damn shame if the band were remembered mainly as mid-noughties hype success rather than as a group that constantly evolved and reinvented themselves over time. Come on Album Four – let's help the history books out a bit.







 
Read more at http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/mgmt-are-coming-back-in-2016-heres-why-you-should-be-excited?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=mgmt#bpIcabGh2f9giuPF.99
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