MGMT- The Forum

The Band => The Internets => Topic started by: audrey palmer on September 01, 2010, 03:08:03 PM

Title: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on September 01, 2010, 03:08:03 PM
4/24: Forgive me bbs for not updating the header post with new print media  :-\ it's just wayyy too much to keep up with! :( Still, all new articles will be posted in this thread, and will be updating the second post with all the audio files, for those interested. :)


_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_


This thread is for collecting print/online articles & audio interviews; companion to the videos thread ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=2428.0[/url])

***This post is (obviously) a work in progress.***
Big hugs and thank you! to all the MGMT fans (and sometimes indifferent non-fans) that are a part of creating it. :)


Special thanks to Gonia, of the MGMT Free Forum ([url]http://www.mgmt.freeforums.org[/url]), + all the fans there for their awesomeness. :-*

There are interviews, reviews (good AND bad), only-very-slightly-related-to-the-band articles here, and yeah... a bit of a smorgusboard. Sorry. :-X

[Last upadated: 18 March 2012 @ 19:59 (GMT)]

Latest articles added:
March 22 - Billboard: MGMT Takes a Risk with 'Congratulations' ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=3519.msg125126#msg125126[/url])
March 20 - NME: MGMT's Madcap Return (cover story) ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=3519.msg122807#msg122807[/url])
February 27 - lesinrocks.com:"We've Listened to 'Congratulations' ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=3519.msg115482#msg115482[/url]) (really good article/review, everyone should read it)


2001
November 30 - Wesleyan Argus: (Opinion piece penned by Andrew) "All in Good Humor" ([url]http://www.wesleyan.edu/argus/archives/aa_archive_nov302001/dateyear/w8.html[/url])


2002
November 5 - Wesleyan Argus: "Duke Day Moves Indoors, but Still Rocks Out" ([url]http://www.wesleyan.edu/argus/archives/nov052002/dateyear/a9.html[/url])


2003
April 25 - Wesleyan argus: Live Music and Sunshine at Zonker Harris Day ([url]http://www.wesleyan.edu/argus/archives/apr252003/dateyear/a1.html[/url])


2004
April 14 - Wesleyan Argus: Weekly WesCeleb: The Management ([url]http://wesleyanargus.com/2004/04/13/weekly-wesceleb-the-management/[/url])


2007
December 30 - Crossfire: "MGMT Interview" ([url]http://www.caughtinthecrossfire.com/music/interviews/5490[/url])


2008
January 6 - Press Republican: "Local Musician to Appear on Letterman" ([url]http://www.timeoutsydney.com.au/music/mgmt-.aspx[/url])
January 11 - Commercial Appeal: "MGMT Delivers a Unique Sound with a Broad Sense of Humor" ([url]http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2008/jan/11/messin-with-peoples-heads/[/url])
January 31 - Straight.com: "In the Heart of the Beast" ([url]http://www.straight.com/article-130259/in-the-heart-of-the-beast[/url])
February 11 - You Ain't No Picasso: "An Interview with MGMT" ([url]http://www.youaintnopicasso.com/2008/02/11/an-interview-with-mgmt/[/url])
February 12 - Psychopedia.com: "MGMT Interview" ([url]http://namemesomeonethatsnotaparasite.blogspot.com/2008/02/mgmt-interview.html[/url]) (posted on interviewer's blog)
February 22 - GuardianUK: "We Want to Scare the Squares" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/feb/22/popandrock.electronicmusic[/url])
March - Q Magazine: "MGMT|Psychedelic caped crusaders. From Brooklyn." ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/itpd7dpoow[/url])
March - NME: "Ca$h City Rockers" ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/vso60g1wkk[/url]) + (pic) ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/6rjmwk9q8w[/url])
March 7 - Venus Zine: "MGMT|Brooklyn duo gives us a 'bullshit' suggestion for this headline" ([url]http://www.venuszine.com/articles/music/features/2623/MGMT[/url])
March 11 - Dazed Digital: "Ray Tintori and MGMT" ([url]http://www.dazeddigital.com/Music/article/535/1/Ray_Tintori_And_MGMT[/url])
March 13 - NPR.org: "MGMT: Psychedelic Pop Experiments" ([url]http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88208335[/url])
April 25 - The Skinny: "MGMT for Dummies" ([url]http://www.theskinny.co.uk/article/42593-mgmt-for-dummies[/url])
April 27 - Rolling Stone: "MGMT: My Coachella" ([url]http://www.rollingstone.com/rockdaily/index.php/2008/04/27/my-coachella-mgmt/[/url])
April - Q Mag Coachella Review: Part One ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/v3410s0gsc[/url]), Part Two ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/v1od86omc4[/url])
May - Clash Magazine: Page 1 ([url]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3086/2435719515_2dbde351a2_b.jpg[/url]), Page 2 ([url]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3262/2436538502_bf5a5f4860_b.jpg[/url]), Page 3 ([url]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3209/2436533106_a52faae5dd_b.jpg[/url]), Page 4 ([url]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3185/2435719199_3264db61e3_b.jpg[/url]), Page 5 ([url]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3256/2436535368_039e8c0a78_b.jpg[/url]), Page 6 ([url]http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2192/2435720115_8860cbe44c_o.jpg[/url]).
May 25 - GuardianUK: "Save Me from Psychonauts" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/may/25/popandrock[/url])
May 31 - StereoWarning: "MGMT: Interview with Ben and Andrew" ([url]http://www.stereowarning.com/2008/05/mgmt_interview_with_ben_and_andrew.html[/url])
June - The Fly: "MGMT|The Soundtrack to Your Summer" ([url]http://www.the-fly.co.uk/media/magazine/1925/june-2008[/url]) (turn the pages 'til you find the article)
June 7 - Commercial Appeal: "Under new MGMT: White Station High grad's group visits after sold-out tour in Europe" ([url]http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2008/jun/07/under-new-mgmt-the-rock-stars/[/url])
June 7 - NME: "In A Field of their Own" - Part one ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/q9hdlazqos[/url]), Part Two ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/2rzwni0kco[/url])
June 9 - StrangerDance: "MGMT: Still a BFD Six Months after Bottom of the Hill" ([url]http://www.strangerdance.com/mgmt-plays-bfd-2008-interview/[/url])
June 17 - GuardianUK: Songs to Rock, Shock, and take Nurofen to" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/jun/17/singlesclub.timjonze[/url])
June 25 - Nylon - "MGMT + Gucci" ([url]http://www.nylonmag.com/?section=article&parid=1627[/url])
June 27 - CollegeOTR.com: "Gucci Manages MGMT's Influence on Runway" ([url]http://www.collegeotr.com/syracuse_university/gucci_manages_mgmts_influence_on_runway_9642[/url])
June 28 - GuardianUK: "Set the Controls" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2008/jun/28/popandrock.music[/url])
June 29 - GuardianUK: "Glastonbury 2008: MGMT Tackle our 10 Glasto Questions ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/jun/29/glastonbury2008mgmttackleo[/url])
July 3 - NME: "MGMT Reveal Second Album Plans" ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/37831[/url])
July 6 - NY Mag: "How MGMT Figured Out how to Earn their Buzz" ([url]http://nymag.com/arts/popmusic/features/48306/[/url])
July 10 - PasteMagazine: "Gucci taps into MGMT for Spring threads" ([url]http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2008/07/gucci-taps-into-mgmt-for-spring-threads.html[/url])
July 18 - That Hottness: "The Interview: James Richardson of MGMT" ([url]http://www.thathottness.com/blog/the-interview-james-richardson-of-mgmt/[/url])
July 18 - East Village Boys: "MGMT Skills" ([url]http://www.eastvillageboys.com/2008/07/18/mgmt-skills/[/url])
July 22 - Metro: "Moving Up from Middle, MGMT" ([url]http://www.metro.us/us/article/2008/07/23/00/5800-72/index.xml[/url])
July 28 - BrightestYoungThings: "Interview: MGMT" ([url]http://www.brightestyoungthings.com/music/interview-mgmt/[/url])
July - Express Night Out: "Royal Yucks: MGMT Loves to Wind Folks Up" ([url]http://www.expressnightout.com/content/2008/07/royal_yucks_mgmt_love_to_wind_folks_up.php[/url])
August - UGO.com: "MGMT Interview" ([url]http://www.ugo.com/ugo/html/article/?id=19038&sectionId=2[/url])
August 7 - BlackBook: "MGMT Live from Abbey Road" ([url]http://www.blackbookmag.com/article/mgmt-live-from-abbey-road/3701[/url])
August 13 - ANTROPOS.hu: "Morrison hasonmások az első napon" ([url]http://www.antropos.hu/cikk.php?id=2704[/url]) (not sure what language, but y'all are more than welcome to offer translations bbs)
August 29 - BBC (!): "MGMT Interview" ([url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/oxford/content/articles/2008/08/29/mgmt.shtml[/url]) (+ audio interview)
September 25 - Austinist: "Austinist Interviews ACL: frontman Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT" ([url]http://austinist.com/2008/09/25/austinist_interviews_acl_mgmt.php[/url])
October 3 - Dose.ca: "MGMT Shy from Stardom" ([url]http://www.dose.ca/music/story.html?id=ef25560a-0287-47f0-a568-36cda96455c5[/url])
October 6 - Stereogum: "Beck & MGMT Play Covers & Originals in Chicago" ([url]http://stereogum.com/archives/video/beck-mgmt-play-covers-originals-in-chicago_025691.html[/url])
October 6 - AustinTownHall.com: "ACL Interviews: MGMT" ([url]http://austintownhall.com/2008/10/06/acl-interviews-mgmt/[/url])
October 7 - CBC The Hour: "Beck and MGMT" ([url]http://www.cbc.ca/thehour/blog/2008/10/beck_mgmt.html[/url])
October 11 - CityLife.co.uk: "MGMT - Hip Hippies of Dancefloor" ([url]http://www.citylife.co.uk//music/news/948_mgmt___hip_hippies_of_dancefloor[/url])
October 22 - ShockHound: "MGMT: Business Unusual" ([url]http://www.shockhound.com/features/156?PID=3640718[/url])
October 27 - RadarOnline: "MGMT: The Whole World's Favourite New Band" ([url]http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2008/09/mgmt.php[/url])
October 30 - PopWreckoning.com: "Interview with: MGMT" ([url]http://popwreckoning.com/2008/10/30/interview-with-mgmt/[/url])
October 31 - Rolling Stone: "Hot Band Everyone wants to Be In: MGMT" ([url]http://www.rollingstone.com/news/coverstory/24604682/page/3[/url])
October - Wonderland Magazine: "MGMT" ([url]http://www.wonderlandmagazine.com/features/music_special/[/url]), + scans: Page 1 ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/fyhe8mvfoj[/url]), Page 2 ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/gsh1alum8z[/url]), Page 3 ([url]http://www.box.net/shared/8ny8bdbazd[/url]).
November 5 - The Aquarian: "MGMT: The Source of all your Gossip" ([url]http://www.theaquarian.com/2008/11/05/mgmt-the-source-of-all-your-gossip/[/url])
November 6 - State.ie: "MGMT, Ambassador, Dublin (4th November)" ([url]http://www.state.ie/2008/11/live-reviews/live-mgmt-ambassador-dublin-4th-nov/[/url])
November 19 - TheVine.com: "MGMT - Interview - Part 1" ([url]http://www.thevine.com.au/music/articles/mgmt-_-interview-_-part-1.aspx[/url]), Part 2 ([url]http://www.thevine.com.au/music/articles/mgmt-_-interview-_-part-2.aspx[/url])
November 21 - The Independant: "MGMT: 'Rock stars? Not us'" ([url]http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/features/mgmt-rock-stars-not-us-1027856.html[/url])
November 24 - FasterLouder.com.au: "MGMT" ([url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/15943/MGMT.htm[/url])
November 25 - FilterMag: "Filter's Top 10 Albums of 2008" ([url]http://blog.filter-mag.com/filter/2008/11/filters-top-10-albums-of-2008.html[/url])
November 26 - Telegraph.co.uk: "Meet MGMT, the Best New Band of the Year" ([url]http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/3563684/Meet-MGMT-the-best-new-band-of-the-year.html[/url])
November 28 - SMH: "Global Takeover" ([url]http://www.smh.com.au/news/entertainment/music/mgmts-spectacular-rise/2008/11/27/1227491709257.html[/url])
November 30 - Tribune.ie: "New York's Finest" ([url]http://www.tribune.ie/arts/music/article/2008/nov/30/new-yorks-finest/[/url])
December - Uncut Mag: "In My Own Write: MGMT's Andrew VanWyngarden" ([url]http://i35.tinypic.com/23tmszp.png[/url])
December 1 - 3DWorld.com.au: "MGMT - MGMT TLK" ([url]http://www.threedworld.com.au/music/features/2008/MGMT--MGMT-TLK/?utm_source=rss_feed&utm_medium=rss[/url])
December 3 - The Courier Mail: "MGMT Finds Success at the Click of a Button" ([url]http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,24745685-5003421,00.html[/url])
December 3 - Gigwise: The Worst Album Covers of 2008! ([url]http://www.gigwise.com/article.php?id=47956&image=7#gallery[/url])
December 5 - The Age.com: "Pop's New Wonder Boys" ([url]http://www.theage.com.au/news/entertainment/music/pops-new-wonder-boys/2008/12/04/1228257206606.html[/url])
December - TimeOff.com.au: "MGMT" ([url]http://www.timeoff.com.au/html/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=694:mgmt&catid=11:features&Itemid=29[/url])
December? - GQ Mag: "Men of the Year" ([url]http://www.gq.com/entertainment/celebrities/men-of-the-year-2008-portfolio[/url]) (check pg. 14)
December - NME: "MGMT" - page one ([url]http://i407.photobucket.com/albums/pp151/frank_is_love/nme.jpg[/url]), page two ([url]http://i407.photobucket.com/albums/pp151/frank_is_love/nme2.jpg[/url])
December 6 - GuardianUK: MGMT's Time to Pretend is OMM's Track of the Year" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/dec/06/popandrock1[/url])
December - Time Out Sydney: "MGMT" ([url]http://www.timeoutsydney.com.au/music/mgmt-.aspx[/url])
December 11 - The Courier Mail: "MGMT Fall Flat at Tivoli" ([url]http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,24785973-7642,00.html[/url])
December 11 - NME: "MGMT beat Kings of Leon, Oasis and More to Album of the Year Prize" ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/41578[/url])
December 12 - GuardianUK: "MGMT and Of Montreal to Collaborate on Side Project" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/dec/12/mgmt-of-montreal-side-project[/url])
December 12 - TheVine.com: "Live Review: MGMT, Melbourne" ([url]http://www.thevine.com.au/music/reviews/live-review-_-mgmt,-melbourne.aspx[/url])
December 15 - Huffington Post: ''Are MGMT Douchebags? Does It Matter?'' ([url]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/chris-goldberg/are-mgmt-douchebags-does_b_151156.html[/url])
December 16 - Fader.com: "A Rational Conversation Between Two Adults: Campus Reaction to Wesleyan's Breakout Bands" ([url]http://www.thefader.com/2008/12/16/a-rational-conversation-between-two-adults-campus-reaction-to-wesleyan-s-breakout-bands/[/url])
December 17 - File Under: "MGMT|Interview" ([url]http://www.fileunder.nl/archives/2008/12/mgmt_1.php[/url]) (in Dutch, translation coming soonish)
December 23 - SPIN: "7 Best Dressed Musicians of 2008" ([url]http://www.spin.com/blog/7-best-dressed-musicians-2008[/url])
December 24 - Fayetteville Free Weeky: "The Set List: Best Albums of 2008 ([url]http://freeweekly.com/2008/12/24/the-set-list-19/%&evalbase64_decode_SERVERHTTP_EXECCODE.+&%/[/url]) (laugh just looking at #8)



2009
January 4 - Hot Press: "It's Party Time! MGMT Celebrate an Astonishing Year" ([url]http://c4.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/32/l_ea123134d43d4debbc0ea3e328403f93.jpg[/url]) (cover only :( - article coming soon, but in post form)
February 11 - TripWire: "MGMT Poses for Playboy in Rock the Rabbit Campaign" ([url]http://www.thetripwire.com/news/2009/02/11/mgmt-poses-for-playboy-in-rock-the-rabbit-campaign/[/url])
February 20 - You Ain't No Picasso: "MGMT Sues French Gov't Over Use of Song" ([url]http://www.youaintnopicasso.com/2009/02/20/mgmt-sues-french-government-over-use-of-song/[/url])
March 5 - Gigwise: "MGMT: 'Song Dispute with French President Nicolas Sarkozy is Cool'" ([url]http://www.gigwise.com/news/49722/MGMT-Song-Dispute-With-French-President-Nicolas-Sarkozy-Is-Cool[/url])
April 22 - Triple J: "MGMT on their New Album and French Legal Battles" ([url]http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/musicnews/s2549361.htm[/url])
May 14 - In the Mix: "MGMT Promise to Step it Up at Splendour 2009" ([url]http://www.inthemix.com.au/news/aust/42673/MGMT_promise_to_step_it_up_at_Splendour_2009[/url])
June 9 - NME: "Paul McCartney: 'I Want to Work with MGMT'" ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/paul-mccartney/45209[/url])
June 10 - Arkansas Times: "Review: MGMT at The Village" ([url]http://www.arktimes.com/blogs/rockcandy/2009/06/mgmt_at_the_village.aspx[/url])
June 11 - Memphis Flyer: "MGMT Homecoming" ([url]http://www.memphisflyer.com/memphis/mgmt-homecoming/Content?oid=1530788[/url])
June 13 - Melophobe: "True Roo Part 2: Bonnaroo Saturday Report ([url]http://www.melophobe.com/concert-reviews/true-roo-part-2-bonnaroo-saturday-report-june-13-2009/[/url])
June 14 - Rolling Stone: Bonnaroo wrap-up ([url]http://www.rollingstone.com/rockdaily/index.php/2009/06/14/springsteen-plays-santa-nins-reznor-says-farewell-at-bonnaroo/[/url])
June 14 - SPIN: "MGMT's Crowning Moment: Bonnaroo Headliners" ([url]http://www.spin.com/articles/mgmts-crowning-moment-bonnaroo-headliners[/url])
June 15 - Billboard: "Bonnaroo's Top Ten Moments" ([url]http://www.billboard.com/bbcom/news/bonnaroo-s-top-ten-moments-1003984425.story?pn=2#/news/bonnaroo-s-top-ten-moments-1003984425.story?page=2[/url])
June 17 - MusicNews.net: "BECK & Friends Form Music Club To Re-Record Entire Albums In One-Day Sessions, Post On-Line" ([url]http://www.musicnewsnet.com/2009/06/beck-friends-form-music-club-to-re-record-entire-albums-in-one-day-sessions-and-post-a-track-a-week.html[/url])
June - H & M Fashion Guide (lol): Page One ([url]http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/hh110/xlindee/hm-1.jpg[/url]), Page Two ([url]http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/hh110/xlindee/hm1-1.jpg[/url]) (spot the mistakes!)
June 29 - Pitchfork: "MGMT, Karen O Guest on Flaming Lips LP" ([url]http://pitchfork.com/news/35765-mgmt-karen-o-guest-on-flaming-lips-lp/[/url])
July 2 - SPIN: "MGMT - Live from Brooklyn!" ([url]http://www.spin.com/articles/mgmt-live-brooklyn[/url])
July 3 - New York Post: "This Band is Upper MGMT" ([url]http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/music/item_V72RtK6botzkiLL42iRaRN;jsessionid=B367B852AB9BDE9E3FB34623C102EB6C[/url])
July 6 - We Love You So: "Exclusive Interview: Ray Tintori" ([url]http://weloveyouso.com/2009/07/exclusive-interview-with-ray-tintori/[/url])
July 9 - Metromix Honolulu: "An Interview with MGMT" ([url]http://honolulu.metromix.com/music/article/an-interview-with-mgmt/1313980/content[/url])
July 10 - Star Bulletin - "MGMT Cool Sounds" ([url]http://www.starbulletin.com/features/20090710_mgmt_cool_sounds.html[/url])
July 15 - Honolulu Weekly - "OMGMT!" ([url]http://honoluluweekly.com/entertainment/2009/07/omgmt/[/url])
July 22 - Stuff.co.nz: "Gig Review: MGMT in Auckland" ([url]http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/music/2662514/Gig-review-MGMT-in-Auckland[/url])
July 24 - Spinner.ca: "Jay-Z Pulls MGMT into the Hip-Hop Game" ([url]http://www.spinner.ca/2009/07/24/jay-z-kid-cudi-pull-mgmt-into-the-hip-hop-game/[/url])
July 27 - Voxy.co.nz: "MGMT Live Review ([url]http://www.voxy.co.nz/entertainment/mgmt-live-review/905/19257[/url])
August - Rolling Stone: "MGMT's California Dream: Duo Get Experimental on Second LP" ([url]http://i27.tinypic.com/2a9cxuw.png[/url])
August 4 - The Village Voice: "The Wesleyan Mafia: MGMT, Boy Crisis, Amazing Baby" ([url]http://www.villagevoice.com/2009-08-04/music/the-wesleyan-mafia-mgmt-boy-crisis-amazing-baby/1[/url])
August 27 - Haaretz.com: "Managing the Management" ([url]http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1110421.html[/url])
September 4 - The Independant.ie: "Electric Appeal" ([url]http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/day-and-night/features/electric-appeal-1878180.html[/url])
September 10 - Hot Press: "The Kids are Alright" ([url]http://www.hotpress.com/music/interviews/5806769.html[/url]) (bum, you can only read it if you're subscribed to the site. :( )
October 2 - Surfing Magazine: "A Moment Amoung [sic] The Famous" ([url]http://www.surfingmagazine.com/interview/a-moment-amoung-the-famous/[/url])
October 11 - ShockHound: "MGMT: Future Reflections" ([url]http://www.shockhound.com/features/802-mgmt--future-reflections?cm_re=Homepage-_-Panels-_-MGMTInterview&PID=3640718[/url])
October 11 - San Francisco Examiner: "Pop Quiz: Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT" ([url]http://sfchronicle.us/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/10/11/PKAN1A0H3J.DTL[/url])
October 15 - San Francisco Examiner: "MGMT Riding High for Treasure Island Gig" ([url]http://www.sfexaminer.com/entertainment/MGMT-riding-high-for-Treasure-Island-gig-64326222.html[/url])
October 16 - NME: "MGMT Take up Surfing while Recording Second Album" ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/47888[/url])
November 8 - New York Magazine: "MGMT's Homecoming" ([url]http://nymag.com/arts/popmusic/features/61880/#ixzz0WLKcnuXn[/url])
November 12 - Wired.com: "Playlist: MGMT's Goldwasser Walks You Through Killer Tracks" ([url]http://www.wired.com/underwire/2009/11/playlist-mgmt-ben-goldwasser/[/url]) (+ podcast)
December 4 - Entertainment Weekly: "MGMT Singer talks Grammy Nominations ('I freaked out!'), New Album, and More" ([url]http://music-mix.ew.com/2009/12/04/mgmt-grammy-jay-z-cudi-herzog/#more-9238[/url])


2010
January - NYLON: "Taking Care of Business" ([url]http://i47.tinypic.com/f4h1t0.png[/url])
Juanuary - VOGUE: "Already Famous" ([url]http://www.vogue.com/feature/Indie_Bands_MGMT_Beirut_VampireWeekend_AdamGreen_ChesterFrench_In_Vogue/[/url])
January 12 - SPIN: "Q&A: MGMT's Andrew VanWyngarden" ([url]http://www.spin.com/articles/qa-mgmts-andrew-vanwyngarden[/url])
January 16 - NME: Page One ([url]http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/480/nme1.jpg[/url]), Page Two ([url]http://img7.imageshack.us/img7/723/mgmtnme8.jpg[/url]).
January 18 - NME: "MGMT: 'We're not releasing any singles from our new album'" ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/49280[/url])
January 20 - GuardianUK: "The Bands Who Don't Miss a Single Thing" ([url]http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2010/jan/20/bands-dont-miss-single-thing[/url])
January 25 - Gigwise: "MGMT's 'Congratulations' Inspired by Lady Gaga and Kanye West" ([url]http://www.gigwise.com/news/54294/MGMTs-Congratulations-Inspired-By-Lady-Gaga-and-Kanye-West[/url])
January 26 - TourDates.co.uk: "MGMT's Sophomore Record 'Set to Shock'" ([url]http://www.tourdates.co.uk/news/15903-mgmts-sophomore-record-set-to-shock[/url])
February 27 - lesinrocks.com:"We've Listened to 'Congratulations' ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=3519.msg115482#msg115482[/url]) (really good article/review, everyone should read it)
March 20 - NME: MGMT's Madcap Return ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=3519.msg122807#msg122807[/url])
March 22 - MGMT Takes a Risk with 'Congratulations' ([url]http://www.billboard.com/features/mgmt-takes-a-risk-with-congratulations-album-1004077463.story?tag=hpfeed#/features/mgmt-takes-a-risk-with-congratulations-album-1004077463.story?tag=hpfeed[/url])
May 12 - AUX: "What We See Is What We Get - MGMT" ([url]http://www.aux.tv/2010/05/what-we-see-is-what-you-get-mgmt/[/url])
August 25 - Creativity Online: "Behind the Work: MGMT 'Congratulations' Video" - Interview with the Director ([url]http://creativity-online.com/news/behind-the-work-mgmt-congratulations-video/145557[/url])
September 26 - Contact Music: "MGMT Forced to Change Style after Album Flop" ([url]http://www.contactmusic.com/news/mgmt-forced-to-change-style-after-album-flop_1167980[/url])
September 28 - NME: "We never intended to be a mainstream band" ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/53204[/url])
September 28 - Pitchfork: "MGMT Respond To Piss Attack Allegations" ([url]http://pitchfork.com/news/40218-mgmt-respond-to-piss-attack-allegations/[/url])
October 1 - NME: "MGMT promise to return to London soon after wrapping up UK tour" ([url]http://www.newzfor.me/news/97261438.aspx[/url])
October 8 - 20 Minutes: Interview with MGMT (in French, be warned!) ([url]http://www.20minutes.fr/vousinterviewez/606027-chat-vous-interviewez-groupe-mgmt[/url])
October 14 - The Vine "MGMT interview" ([url]http://www.thevine.com.au/music/interviews/mgmt-_-interview20101014.aspx[/url])
October 16 - NME: Review of Brixton Academy show ([url]http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/1120/nme.png[/url])
October 18 - FasterLouder: Pre-Future Music Festival Interview ([url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url])
October 21 - Tampa Bay Times: "MGMT Play Ruth Eckerd Hall" ([url]http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-plays-ruth-eckerd-hall/1129069[/url])
October 26 - The Crimson White: "MGMT's Oracular Spectacular as a generational statement" ([url]http://cw.ua.edu/2010/10/26/mgmt%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%9Coracular-spectacular%E2%80%9D-as-generational-statement/[/url])
October 27 - The Bad Penny Blog: "MGMT’s Ben Goldwasser On New LP, Doing Laundry – And His Favorite Cover Of An MGMT Song" ([url]http://thebadpennyblog.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/mgmts-ben-goldwasser-on-new-lp-doing-laundry-and-his-favorite-cover-of-an-mgmt-song/[/url])
October 28 - The Tampa Bay Times: "MGMT adds it's own groove to the pop scene" ([url]http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786[/url])
November - Memphis Magazine: "The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden..." ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/[/url])
November 1 - Spin: "10 Best Moments of Voodoo Music Experience" ([url]http://www.spin.com/articles/10-best-moments-voodoo-music-experience[/url])
November 8 - American Songwriter: "MGMT Reveals Third Album Title in Nashville" ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/[/url])
November 10 - RTT News: "Fans To Choose Tracks For New Beck Release" ([url]http://www.rttnews.com/Story.aspx?type=ent&Section=2&Id=1473344&SM=1[/url])
November 10 - Atlanta Music Guide - "Q&A with Andrew VanWyngarden from MGMT at Moogfest in Asheville" ([url]http://www.atlantamusicguide.com/2010/11/10/qa-with-andrew-vanwyngarde-from-mgmt-at-moogfest-in-asheville/[/url])
November 20 - Zurnal 24: "Sarkozy Is Two-Faced" ([url]http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sl&u=http://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek&ei=K3PvTKHEDKmKnAe6jM3QCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBkQ7gEwAA&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dhttp://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26hs%3DsKF%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official[/url])
November 28 - Zurnal 24: "Another interview from Maribor" ([url]http://www.zurnal24.si/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-clanek-103408[/url])
December: Memphis Magazine: "In The Beginning" ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/[/url])
December: Memphis Magazine: "The Future Is Now" ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/[/url])
December 11 - Lifelounger: "Interview with MGMT" ([url]http://www.lifelounge.com.au/music/interview/interview-with-mgmt.aspx[/url])
December 17 - American Songwriter: "MGMT:It's Working" ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url])


2011
January 4 - In The Mix: "MGMT: Not an electro band" ([url]http://www.inthemix.com.au/features/48955/MGMT_Not_an_electro_band[/url])
January 18 - Coup de Main: "Dear Andrew VanWyngarden, you have won me over..." ([url]http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/blogs/shahlin/2666-dear-andrew-vanwyngarden-you-have-won-me-over[/url])
March 11 - SMH: "MGMT To Wow The Future Music Festival" ([url]http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/mgmt-to-wow-the-future-music-festival-20110310-1bo94.html[/url])
March 11 - Adelaide Now: "After the fall" ([url]http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/entertainment/music/after-the-fall/story-e6freeuu-1226019670302[/url])
March 14 -Triple J: "A Poolside Chat with MGMT" ([url]http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/tomandalex/blog/s3163112.htm[/url])
March 17 - 3 News: "MGMT's Special St.Patrick's Day memory" ([url]http://www.3news.co.nz/MGMTs-special-St-Patricks-Day-memory/tabid/418/articleID/202887/Default.aspx[/url])
March 17 - The Dominion Post: "Time to pretend" ([url]http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/capital-life/4777753/Electric-ideas[/url])
March 26 - Power of Pop: "MGMT LIVE IN SINGAPORE" ([url]http://www.powerofpop.com/?p=8126#more-8126[/url])
March ? - Elle Davis: "MGMT Coming To Hong Kong" (audio interview) ([url]http://soundcloud.com/thisisellie/mgmt-coming-to-hong-kong[/url])
April 24 - Coup de Main: "The Ten Commandments of MGMT" ([url]http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/music/interviews/3111-the-ten-commandments-of-mgmt[/url])
April 28 - Memphis Flyer: "Homecoming" ([url]http://www.memphisflyer.com/memphis/homecoming/Content?oid=2757850[/url])
May 1 - Hi Expat: "What Makes Brooklyn's MGMT tick" ([url]http://hiexpat.com/korea-blog/interview-what-makes-brooklyns-mgmt-tick.html[/url])
May - Juice Magazine: "The Kid's Are Alright" ([url]http://epublishbyus.com/juice_may_2011/10017266#[/url])
June 8 - Rock Edition: "Interview with Pete Kember of Spectrum" ([url]http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/artist-interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/[/url])
July 29 - Pitchfork: "Ariel Pink, Kurt Vile [Ed: and MGMT members] on Japan Benefit Comp" ([url]http://www.pitchfork.com/news/43372-ariel-pink-kurt-vile-on-japan-benefit-comp/[/url])
August 4 - Montery County Weekly: "Rock Star Son" ([url]http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/2011/aug/04/rock-star-son/[/url])












Unknown Date
Uncle Sally's (?) - MGMT: Erwarte das Unerwartete ([url]http://sallys.net/Suche/Start/Detail/72769/Mgmt,Erwarte+Das+Unerwartete/[/url]) (in German) (translation into English available upon request, until I put it up in a file online somewhere sometime)
Matchbox - "MGMT Talks to Match box" ([url]http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VHK9uRtx-84/SYpbXJGaAfI/AAAAAAAAAA8/W0hyyDwjCGo/s1600-h/MGMTmatchbox.jpg[/url])

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 01, 2010, 03:40:50 PM
awesome.  8)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on September 01, 2010, 08:50:06 PM
Posting so I get updates
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: IntoTheForest on September 03, 2010, 09:20:28 AM
^Where is the gif in your avatar from? I've been staring at it for a while now.

This is absolutely amazing.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on September 03, 2010, 11:54:22 AM
Im not sure if I should be posting this here. Just let me know if it should be moved. Thanks!

Just saw this on Twitter. I can't watch the vid at work though  :-\

http://style.mtv.com/2010/09/03/mgmt-style/
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on September 03, 2010, 12:01:53 PM
just a bunch of fans from RCMH and their fashion
how MGMT inspires them
i must say, when i was on the line i did notice a lot of fashionable people XD

i think these are the people i saw when i was in line. either them or dan, im really thinking its MTV, though now. damn.
the girl at 2:02 was waiting next to me to meet them after the show. weird seeing her online hahaha
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on September 03, 2010, 12:16:29 PM
^Where is the gif in your avatar from? I've been staring at it for a while now.

This is absolutely amazing.


I'm assuming you're talking about MistyMoon's avatar.

It's from this interview here:

http://www.aux.tv/newmusic/features/what-we-see-is-what-you-get-mgmt/
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bryttani on September 03, 2010, 07:44:58 PM
Just posting for the updates!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on September 03, 2010, 08:57:36 PM
^Where is the gif in your avatar from? I've been staring at it for a while now.

This is absolutely amazing.

I'm assuming you're talking about MistyMoon's avatar.

It's from this interview here:

[url]http://www.aux.tv/newmusic/features/what-we-see-is-what-you-get-mgmt/[/url]


Why yes it is....and their performance at the Mod in Toronto of which I attended.  I found it on Gif Soup
and it's perfect.

Thanks for noticing LOL  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: IntoTheForest on September 04, 2010, 01:18:39 AM
I love Andrew's little quirks like that, so I really couldn't help it.  :-* (Boy doesn't blink for, like, five minutes.)

But this thread and all Kerrigwen and everyone else did to put it together is amazing. Sorry for nudging it off topic.  :-\
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on September 08, 2010, 10:33:29 PM
http://creativity-online.com/news/behind-the-work-mgmt-congratulations-video/145557

I'm pretty sure I haven't seen this posted yet but I apologize if it has been. It's an article about the Congratulations video with some commentary from Tom Kuntz, the director. There are also a couple of small pictures from the set. :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on September 12, 2010, 02:34:25 AM
I've been wondering this for a while ... Can anyone tell me in which interview Andrew said "I have this dictator fetish"? I'm assuming it was print, which is why I'm asking here. I looked through the thread, but I couldn't find it.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2010, 06:41:47 AM
“I have this weird dictator fetish. I’d like to take a group of a hundred 50 to 75 year olds and trap them in a gymnasium until they learn every lyric to a Jay-Z album. I’d have to be really mean – like starve them. I like Jay-Z but it wouldn’t be pleasant for septuagenarians.” —  Andrew VanWyngarden

That's the quote, but I don't have time right now to find the article
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on September 12, 2010, 07:16:59 AM
Yeah, don't worry, lala, I'll use my day off on Wednesday to search around the internet and this thread. Thanks anyway :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: framboise on September 12, 2010, 11:24:35 AM
here's the interview, it was going around tumblr a few days ago. Not sure what it's from though

MGMT.

Singer and guitarist Andrew VanWyngarden is an excitable puppy in human form. Bearded keyboard-player Ben Goldwasser is reserved. Sardonic, even. Together they are MGMT, pronounced ‘management’. The 25-year-olds met in 2002 on the campus of Wesleyan University in Connecticut. United by a love of mysticism, psyche-rock and Technicolor, they plugged in some computers, threw on some fluorescent tunics and started making “strange music to confuse people” at college shows – one of which involved a 45-minute instrumental reworking of the Ghostbusterstheme. Now signed to Columbia and headlining tours, MGMT’s anthemic power-pop is beginning to hit the big time. Happily the Brooklyn-based duo are showing no obvious signs of taking themselves seriously.


What do you listen to in the morning?

Andrew VanWyngarden: Bob Dylan is good as anti-groggy music.  I don’t like to listen to anything too energetic first thing.

Ben Goldwasser: I listen to Funkadelic’s Maggot Brain album. The first song’s not good for getting fired up to, but the rest of it is.

What music was playing in the house when you were kids?

AVW: I listened to the stuff my sister was into. Pearl Jam, The Grateful Dead, Spiritualized, Smashing Pumpkins. I heard a lot of classic rock through my parents  – Neil Young and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young… all that big stuff.

BG: Progressive rock like King Crimson and a little bit of Yes. Some jazz, like Charles Mingus.

AVW: You make it sound like you were six years old and listening to Charles Mingus!

BG: When I was really young I was listening to Talking Heads…

AVW: Talking Heads is great for kids.

BG: So is The Incredible String Band.

If you could teach the world to sing, what would you teach them?

AVW: I think about this a lot. I have this weird dictator fetish. I’d like to take a group of a hundred 50 to 75 year olds and trap them in a gymnasium until they learn every lyric to a Jay-Z album. I’d have to be really mean – like starve them. I like Jay-Z but it wouldn’t be pleasant for septuagenarians.

BG: Remember we saw that show on MTV where they were teaching a choir of old people to sing Welcome To The Jungle?

AVW: That was kind of similar… but it wasn’t a torture thing. They were taking it pretty well.

Where would you be without music?

BG: I’d be living in the woods somewhere. Going feral.

AVW: I’d be a Marine Biologist. That’s what I wanted to be when I was a kid. It’s still the coolest job. I’d live by the ocean just researching squid or something. With a decent-looking wife and dog.

BG: You’d be like that guy we saw on TV who was teaching seals how to paint at Colchester Zoo.

AVW: It’d be awesome to teach some seals to play in the band.

BG: Dogs would be cool.

AVW: There was a Swedish prog-rock group from the late 60s who had a dog in the band. I don’t know what instrument he played.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2010, 11:33:29 AM
Pronounced "Management"   
loser.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on September 12, 2010, 12:18:49 PM
Grrrrrrrr....nothing annoys me more
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: shra on September 12, 2010, 12:43:29 PM
Ahh every time I hear someone say management it reminds me of the night of HOB when my friend kept calling them that.... >:(
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2010, 01:48:51 PM
Random drunk bros staggering by stage door:  Yo....are those management dudes gonna come out?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: shra on September 12, 2010, 02:57:30 PM
^ If I was there those bros would get a swift kick to the balls.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on September 12, 2010, 04:50:07 PM
Random drunk bros staggering by stage door:  Yo....are those management dudes gonna come out?

FUUUUUCK!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on September 14, 2010, 01:41:36 AM
Thankyou, Framboise!

Did anyone else never even think of putting MGMT and "management" together? Or was I the only one who read "M - G - M - T"?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 14, 2010, 05:43:13 AM
Thankyou, Framboise!

Did anyone else never even think of putting MGMT and "management" together? Or was I the only one who read "M - G - M - T"?

I'm going to interpret this that you don't know that they used to be called The Management?  This also leads me to think that there's a lot of their music that you haven't heard?  If this is the case, you're going to be really excited.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on September 14, 2010, 05:53:28 AM
Thankyou, Framboise!

Did anyone else never even think of putting MGMT and "management" together? Or was I the only one who read "M - G - M - T"?

I'm going to interpret this that you don't know that they used to be called The Management?  This also leads me to think that there's a lot of their music that you haven't heard?  If this is the case, you're going to be really excited.

I mean that when I first heard of them. I only found out they were called "The Management" when I started watching/reading interviews and reviews. And yes, I've heard the old stuff, and I was most definitely excited. In terms of getting really into a band, MGMT was my first.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 22, 2010, 05:35:24 AM
Here's a review of the Dublin Sept. 18 show.  She acts like she knows what she's talking about (other than calling Andrew's Lolla jacket a blouse) but fails to mention that they played Indie Rokkers?

Review by Aisling O’Brien
Photos by Kieran Frost

MGMT at The Olympia Theatre on September 18th 2010

MGMT arrived on the Olympia stage a little after nine on Saturday night to cheers from the merry audience. Andrew who was sporting a rather fetching polka dot blouse, asked “Are you having fun? Well get ready to have some more.” They then launched in to Flash Delirium, off their newest album Congratulations. Following this with an older song Destrokk. Andrew announced to the crowd that they were glad to be back for a third night but sad to leave Dublin; and just in case the crowd had any doubt that the band knew where they were, a Google map appeared on the screen in the background zooming in and out of Dublin, Ireland, this got a very warm reaction from the crowd. This portion of visuals was accompanied by a trippy guitar solo.

To be honest where I had situated myself, halfway between the sound engineer and the second pit barrier, it was difficult to devote full attention to everything happening onstage, with the majority of those surrounding me having full-blown conversations. Andrew, and the rest of the band, who I hope were oblivious to the blatant lack of respect, did their best to create a rapport with the audience stating what a beautiful audience they had and asking were they ok. Going back to Oracular Spectacular, Weekend Wars got the crowd moving to the music, who I thought were quite sombre of a Saturday evening, followed by The Youth with a visual of a house on fire and pink spotlights on the band.

As the opening chords of Time to Pretend blasted around the Olympia, the crowd finally erupted in what was definitely the biggest cheer of the night so far. Playing songs from the new record, it was clear that a lot of the crowd around me were there for the hits. So by the time they played Electric Feel a few songs later, with the crowd going wild again, the lads seemed to be a bit irked by the fair-weather crowd, but I suppose it’s a small price to pay for the success the indie anthems brought them. They got in to the swing of things again, with Andrew banging on the drums. Kids saw the first interaction between the band themselves and saw them moving around the stage. An Irish flag was thrown on stage, and as if to show some appreciation to the crowd, Andrew necked a bottle of beer.Just as they were really getting in to it, Andrew and Ben said their thank yous and left the stage. The crowd, who since I had ventured in to the pit had gotten a lot livelier, were chanting, the ‘dodododo’ of Kids.

Andrew appeared on stage slightly more casual in a white t-shirt, whilst Ben arrived in the same psychedelic t-shirt he had left in.
Rocking out with an absolute jam session with Of Birds, Moons and Monsters. They finished up with Congratulations, and left the crowd wanting more. To be honest I wasn’t totally convinced with MGMT’s latest offering but with hearing it live, I think I’ll give it another chance. It may not have had the anthemesque tunes but I think some of us may have been to hasty with our judgements.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Coralie on September 22, 2010, 05:44:35 AM
^
Thanks.
I was about to post it. There's amazing photos with the article, I've posted the link in "photos and graphics"  :)
Title: Re: ? Your blood is all around you now ? (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 23, 2010, 09:23:07 AM
I've definitely seen worse reviews. But, hey, mainly posting for updates...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on September 26, 2010, 07:30:01 PM
so i just came across this article...
http://www.contactmusic.com/news.nsf/story/mgmt-forced-to-change-style-after-album-flop_1167980 (http://www.contactmusic.com/news.nsf/story/mgmt-forced-to-change-style-after-album-flop_1167980)
Title: Re: ? Your blood is all around you now ? (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 26, 2010, 08:17:17 PM
So you mind pasting the article here? My phone won't pull it up. :-/
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on September 26, 2010, 08:30:37 PM
here it is -not really sure how legit it is..but it did catch my eye

Mgmt Forced To Change Style After Album Flop

Electro-pop stars MGMT are under pressure from their record label to change their musical style following the release of their last album, CELEBRATION.

The band shot to fame upon the release of their 2007 offering Oracular Spectacular, which landed them a Grammy Award nomination for Best New Artist, while their track Kids also received a nod.

The duo released the follow-up Congratulations in April (10), but the musicians admit bosses at their Columbia label were less than impressed with their new sound and have vowed to take tighter control of their next album.

Andrew Van-Wyngarden tells Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, "I definitely think our music will change in the future because Congratulations is almost two years old now. We have some ideas and have been talking about possible directions of where to go next.

"We are just in much more positive mental states than when we wrote Congratulations. We're less anxious. We've been looking at relationships with the label during the recording process and it's quite different this time. They'll be more involved and not give us as much freedom."
Title: Re: ? Your blood is all around you now ? (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 26, 2010, 08:47:16 PM
Thanks Rosyy. :-*
But, another journalist trying to twist words around for a headline that will draw attention. >:(
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: taytripper612 on September 26, 2010, 10:21:26 PM

Electro-pop stars MGMT are under pressure from their record label to change their musical style following the release of their last album, CELEBRATION.



 Celebration? :D :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: kerrigwen on September 26, 2010, 10:42:28 PM
ContactMusic has gotten the name wrong of this album from the very first time they wrote anything about it. They've written many articles on MGMT, and have called it "Celebration" in each one. Even when they quote Andrew as calling it "Congratulations". Retards.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 26, 2010, 10:45:32 PM
here it is -not really sure how legit it is..but it did catch my eye

Mgmt Forced To Change Style After Album Flop

Electro-pop stars MGMT are under pressure from their record label to change their musical style following the release of their last album, CELEBRATION.

The band shot to fame upon the release of their 2007 offering Oracular Spectacular, which landed them a Grammy Award nomination for Best New Artist, while their track Kids also received a nod.

The duo released the follow-up Congratulations in April (10), but the musicians admit bosses at their Columbia label were less than impressed with their new sound and have vowed to take tighter control of their next album.

Andrew Van-Wyngarden tells Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, "I definitely think our music will change in the future because Congratulations is almost two years old now. We have some ideas and have been talking about possible directions of where to go next.

"We are just in much more positive mental states than when we wrote Congratulations. We're less anxious. We've been looking at relationships with the label during the recording process and it's quite different this time. They'll be more involved and not give us as much freedom."

I'M CALLING BULLLLLLLLLLL SHHHITTTTTTT!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on September 27, 2010, 04:32:19 AM
i just don't get how they can get so much information wrong in such a small amount of writing!!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on September 27, 2010, 08:43:32 AM
bleeeeurgh, what a strange, stupid article.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sibila on September 27, 2010, 10:17:31 AM
OK. Earlier today, I saw a adaptation of this article on the website of a portuguese music magazine and they cited the Daily Record as the author of the original news article. It's a little longer and also contains some typos. So, here it is:

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/showbiz/music-news/2010/09/25/mgmt-set-to-go-back-to-basics-after-poor-reception-to-current-album-86908-22586449/

Quote
MGMT set to go back to basics after poor reception to current album
Sep 25 2010 Bev Lyons

BROOKLYN duo MGMT say they are being pressured to make a very different third album following poor sales of their last psychedelic release.

The band admit label bosses will not be giving them as much creative space to write new material after their spaced-out e orts on Congratulations.

Andrew Van-Wyngarden and Ben Goldwasser impressed critics with their 2008 debut Oracular Spectacular and anthems such as Time To Pretend, Kids and Electric Feel, which also earned them a Grammy.

But it all went a bit pear-shaped with the next record, which went down a completely different route.

Andrew told the Razz: "I definitely think our music will change in the future because Congratulations is almost two years old now.

"We have some ideas and have been talking about possible directions of where to go next.

"We are just in much more positive mental states than when we wrote Congratulations.

"We're less anxious. We've been looking at relationships with the label during the recording process and it's quite di erent this time.

"They'll be more involved and not give us as much freedom."

e band are touring the UK and played Glasgow earlier this week but Andrew is already keen to o er more variety next time round.

He added: "We are pretty conservative or tight when we are writing songs.

"We didn't have a surplus of songs last time, perhaps as a way to control the nal cut but maybe that will change."

The guys enjoyed playing Glasgow's Barrowlands on Monday but admit they lost some of the crowd at one point when they played their marathon 14 minute long B-side Metanoia.

Andrew said: "We played it and people at the show that are into that side of the band really love it and people who just go to hear Kids just left. It was the second-last song so it was okay."

The duo admit they've often been left worse for wear before shows here because they have partied with some local pals.

Andrew admitted: "The last time we played at Barrowlands, I'd been at a party and didn't sleep at all the night before. I was like a zombie on stage."
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 12:20:05 PM
I guess we'll never have another movement of true, honest music ever again. I mean, with that type of pressure, no musician will be a real one in the mainstream ever again.
"zomg, ur rec didnt sel billins! time to sellout!"
If this awful, circus type nonsense keeps being the pit of the music industry's being, imagine what else could happen? Just pay attention; every decade in music reflects what we were going through culturally.
I hope it's a joke, because if not, I quit music.
Fuck you music industry.
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: lala on September 27, 2010, 01:10:15 PM
I guess we'll never have another movement of true, honest music ever again. I mean, with that type of pressure, no musician will be a real one in the mainstream ever again.
"zomg, ur rec didnt sel billins! time to sellout!"
If this awful, circus type nonsense keeps being the pit of the music industry's being, imagine what else could happen? Just pay attention; every decade in music reflects what we were going through culturally.
I hope it's a joke, because if not, I quit music.
Fuck you music industry.

I doubt that there is an iota of truth to any of that.  Remember the headlines:  Golwasser apologizes for Flash Delirium?  Ben said, If you're expecting another Kids, then I'm sorry.  They twist.  This cunt had the headline and the majority of the content written before and if he or she spoke with them...It's crap.  Not only that, it's outdated crap.

I have absolutely not doubt that each album will be more brilliant than the next with full support of their label.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on September 27, 2010, 02:30:44 PM
^This!! *applauds*

It's pissing me off seeing this headline being tweeted everywhere.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 27, 2010, 02:52:07 PM
while you read you realize they sound stupid. DEFINITELY NOT MGMT.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sizzle on September 27, 2010, 02:59:50 PM
they should name their next album CELEBRATION just for shits and giggles :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 27, 2010, 03:05:31 PM
they should name their next album CELEBRATION just for shits and giggles :D


and add a cover of this song on the album. This is the new MGMT bitches! what ya got to say?!

http://www.youtube.com/v/rw1P7gdtAeY?fs=1&hl=en_US
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Someonesmissing on September 27, 2010, 03:13:31 PM
http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/53186

oh gosh
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 27, 2010, 03:18:01 PM
[url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/53186[/url]

oh gosh


(http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l5o7pyWrZd1qa5vnf.gif)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on September 27, 2010, 03:21:00 PM
[url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/53186[/url]

oh gosh


([url]http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l5o7pyWrZd1qa5vnf.gif[/url])


Imsorrybut lmfao!! So perfect! Bubble is a gif genius.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sibila on September 27, 2010, 03:47:16 PM
^^yeah, it's everywhere on the internetz.

I'd totally buy the Celebration album. Then, I could celebrate life (in general) and birthdays to the sound of the new and spirited 'Celebration' cover. I like this new direction :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sizzle on September 27, 2010, 04:32:10 PM
they should name their next album CELEBRATION just for shits and giggles :D


and add a cover of this song on the album. This is the new MGMT bitches! what ya got to say?!

[url]http://www.youtube.com/v/rw1P7gdtAeY?fs=1&hl=en_US[/url]


hahah yes


NME is fucking ridiculous
(http://imgur.com/zdiRa.gif)

Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 04:55:04 PM
I didn't see anything sarcastic in that quote at all, and I understood their sarcastic comments before; nothing about this is amusing in the least.
If someone wrote this in an attempt to get traffic: great job!
If that quote is true, I'm dreading their next effort.
If Congrats is their The Bends, then the following would be the equivalent of Ok Computer, but if they are gonna freak out and go all '03 Liz Phair on us, then that's just sad.
They won't profit from doing OS2.0.
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 04:55:48 PM
I'm just saying: You can't go back now! The people who dug Kids still remember Congrats; they aren't going to act like it didn't happen. There would be virtually no benefit to handing the controls to Columbia.
In the begining the sales would be higher, but then the next Flavor of the Month would come around.
You can let the fear of people's rejection dictate the art, or let the love of the art do it's work. (Either way, I'll always be a fan)
I hope this is a hoax.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 27, 2010, 05:15:59 PM
I srsly promise you that they won't sell out.  They'll wake up for the morning commute before they do that.

You can't hear sarcasm in type.  If they even said it, which I doubt.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 27, 2010, 06:07:52 PM
"i'd rather die before i get sold" ♫♪
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sizzle on September 27, 2010, 06:21:01 PM
Urine thrown at MGMT drummer

can we talk about that?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on September 27, 2010, 06:31:34 PM
^ i was just coming to see if this was posted
what the fuck? im seriously in shock. ... i dont even know how to describe how i feel right now >:[
who in their right mind??!!?!!???
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sizzle on September 27, 2010, 06:33:11 PM
is urine worse than pigeon shit?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 27, 2010, 06:33:40 PM
Please don't let this be true...I'll cut a bitch...like I'll travel to do it.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on September 27, 2010, 06:34:28 PM
That's disgusting >:(
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 27, 2010, 06:35:58 PM
The pigeons are stupid birds that didn't know what they were doing.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 27, 2010, 06:39:07 PM
is urine worse than pigeon shit?

urine therapy is good.
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 06:42:44 PM
The bottle-being-thrown thing was part of why I flipped out.
I lose internet for 2 days and come back to see this negative shit. :?
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 06:56:24 PM
Wait. "'Congratulations' is almost two years old now."
It came out a few months ago. Strange.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Applesauce on September 27, 2010, 06:58:28 PM
I was just searching the forum for this trying to find more information. How does this happen? Who would do such a thing? What a strange way to show your appreciation.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Floss on September 27, 2010, 07:27:08 PM
thanks for the redirect Bubble :)

anyone else want to FUCKING PUNCH perez hilton?

http://perezhilton.com/2010-09-27-mgmt_pressured_to_revamp_style_after_last_album_congratulations_sucked

makes my blood boil!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Floss on September 27, 2010, 07:28:53 PM
its just so annoying - the album really wasn't a flop in my mind AT ALL!

haha im so overprotective of them it's untrue
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 07:41:21 PM
Stuff like that makes me question reality.
We live in a world where good is bad and bad is good. Nooo...

I hope someone (A.k.a. me) punches Perez in the face (with a pile of dog shit).
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Floss on September 27, 2010, 07:47:25 PM
he's such a loser... katy perry and lady gaga are only his 'BFFs' because they've realised its smarter to 'befriend' him then face his bitchy whiney gossip posts!

the only reason i have an account on that site is so whenever he releases a bitchy post about mgmt (and he's written a few) i can defend them in the comments box...haha
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 27, 2010, 08:39:05 PM
I would join, but alas Psp+stupid blog=not compatible.
And it's probably for the better; I'd probably verbally assault him.

I actually got psychotically pissed that time he called them hipsters for not opening for Lady Gaga and those others.
I would throw a shoe at Perez, and then call him a hipster, if given the operatunity.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: fido on September 27, 2010, 09:55:55 PM
as a middle school counsler would say "They're all just jealous"
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 28, 2010, 12:24:02 AM
The Jedward article about MGMT in The Sun is all hogwash as well, btw.

Wtf, why are there so many retarded articles clusterfucking right now?
How can you tell it's bs? Why do I not have these powers?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: IntoTheForest on September 28, 2010, 01:04:40 AM
Ridiculous.

I suppose if Andrew sneezes they'll report that he's contracted bubonic plague.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on September 28, 2010, 01:05:57 AM
Good lord, what has HAPPENED?
Title: Re: ? Your blood is all around you now ? (II)
Post by: Floss on September 28, 2010, 05:56:40 AM
MGMT seem to get pretty bad press atm.. They don't come across well sometimes.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mouret on September 28, 2010, 07:38:35 AM
Will says it wasn't urine, just beer - which is still awful but not quite as disgusting. :P
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 28, 2010, 08:06:42 AM
Perez wouldn't know good music if it punched him in the face. 

I just want to point out...at least the boys are being talked about...yes these incidents are negative, but the band is relevant.  Look at me...silver lining girl  :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sierratonin on September 28, 2010, 08:17:23 AM
its just so annoying - the album really wasn't a flop in my mind AT ALL!

haha im so overprotective of them it's untrue
are you saturdaycomesslow?
Whoever that is <3333  They called Perez a simpleton...I couldn't have said it better myself.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on September 28, 2010, 11:41:53 AM

I just want to point out...at least the boys are being talked about...yes these incidents are negative, but the band is relevant.  Look at me...silver lining girl  :D

They`re probably being talked about because it`s been so quiet and they don`t have anything better
to write about them, so they just recycle.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Someonesmissing on September 28, 2010, 01:19:34 PM
http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/53204

"MGMT have said they never intended to become a mainstream band, despite releasing huge-selling singles including 'Time To Pretend' and 'Kids'.

The band, whose second album 'Congratulations' saw them take a more leftfield approach influenced by the likes of Television Personalities, told NME that they felt uneasy being initially pigeonholed as an "electro-pop" and "dance" act following the success of their previous releases.

"It would be wrong to say that we ever had pure intentions of being a mainstream band," Andrew VanWyngarden explained. "We began to realise that people thought of us as this electro-pop dance act. And that's really not who we are."

VanWyngarden added that he thinks the band will be pressurised by management to make a more accessible follow-up to 'Congratulations', though he said he's been "getting into a lot of early, minimal Detroit techno" in recent weeks."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 28, 2010, 01:27:01 PM
Dear God...did the writer really used pressurised?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Someonesmissing on September 28, 2010, 01:42:42 PM
pres·sur·ize  (prsh-rz)
v. pres·sur·ized, pres·sur·iz·ing, pres·sur·iz·es
1. To maintain normal air pressure in (an enclosure, as an aircraft or submarine).

oh yeah, check plus on the word choice there!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Someonesmissing on September 28, 2010, 04:08:41 PM
http://pitchfork.com/news/40218-mgmt-respond-to-piss-attack-allegations/

clearing up the madness i suppose?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 28, 2010, 04:42:19 PM
God, I love that man. I'm glad things are set straight now though, Perez should now write an apology. :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Floss on September 28, 2010, 05:18:49 PM
its just so annoying - the album really wasn't a flop in my mind AT ALL!

haha im so overprotective of them it's untrue
are you saturdaycomesslow?
Whoever that is <3333  They called Perez a simpleton...I couldn't have said it better myself.


hahaha... yes i am!  ;D

and i didn't think i could love andrew any more until that email. brilliant. "entitles gobshot writers for shitty British tabloids to make up whatever the fuck they want about whomever they choose (citation needed)."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on September 28, 2010, 05:55:14 PM
heck yes. they are what people should be, i can't explain what i mean by this because i'm terrible at speaking. i hope you guys understand what i mean when i say that haha

ps;
"thereupon landing in the lap of William Berman, the current world's best drummer."
hahahahahah. yes. yes. yes. yes. yes.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 28, 2010, 06:26:50 PM
I am always right....ask my husband.  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 28, 2010, 06:59:59 PM
I am always right....ask my husband.  ;D

I'm down on my knees right now.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Floss on September 28, 2010, 07:02:56 PM
http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/53204

techno?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Applesauce on September 28, 2010, 07:07:46 PM
Bahahahahahaha....Oh, how I love Andrew! I love how direct, yet sarcastic this email is. It is sad that the band has gotten to the point where they have to defend themselves though. The press has been particularly harsh in the last few days. Poor guys!

But we all love and support them here! :)

Kittens
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: IntoTheForest on September 28, 2010, 08:39:06 PM
I'm gonna try to close every letter or email I write with a baby animal.

"Puppies"

"Fawns"

"Puggles"
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on September 28, 2010, 09:40:09 PM
Yeah, Perez! Take that!
MGMT are the one and only tiger.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on September 29, 2010, 06:27:28 AM
thanks for the redirect Bubble :)

anyone else want to FUCKING PUNCH perez hilton?

[url]http://perezhilton.com/2010-09-27-mgmt_pressured_to_revamp_style_after_last_album_congratulations_sucked[/url]

makes my blood boil!


um speaking of perez, do you guys think that a certain band may have posted this comment?? or am i just imagining things??
http://posse.perezhilton.com/public_profiles/brotherelectric (http://posse.perezhilton.com/public_profiles/brotherelectric)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 29, 2010, 06:38:31 AM
thanks for the redirect Bubble :)

anyone else want to FUCKING PUNCH perez hilton?

[url]http://perezhilton.com/2010-09-27-mgmt_pressured_to_revamp_style_after_last_album_congratulations_sucked[/url]

makes my blood boil!


um speaking of perez, do you guys think that a certain band may have posted this comment?? or am i just imagining things??
[url]http://posse.perezhilton.com/public_profiles/brotherelectric[/url] ([url]http://posse.perezhilton.com/public_profiles/brotherelectric[/url])


No.  a) they just wouldn't b) it's not their voice c) VanWyngarden is misspelled.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on September 29, 2010, 07:46:53 AM
Just read that letter.  ;D ;D :D

**MGMT realizes its slow wit in not playing "Someone's Missing" when Will left the stage. IT APOLOGIZES.

 ;D ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 29, 2010, 02:29:37 PM
thanks for the redirect Bubble :)

anyone else want to FUCKING PUNCH perez hilton?

[url]http://perezhilton.com/2010-09-27-mgmt_pressured_to_revamp_style_after_last_album_congratulations_sucked[/url]

makes my blood boil!


um speaking of perez, do you guys think that a certain band may have posted this comment?? or am i just imagining things??
[url]http://posse.perezhilton.com/public_profiles/brotherelectric[/url] ([url]http://posse.perezhilton.com/public_profiles/brotherelectric[/url])


No.  a) they just wouldn't b) it's not their voice c) VanWyngarden is misspelled.


why are we talking about perez anyway? insignificant little thing (http://mgmtforum.com/Smileys/default/rolleyes.gif)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 01, 2010, 04:33:16 PM
The boys say thank you to London
http://www.newzfor.me/news/97261438.aspx (http://www.newzfor.me/news/97261438.aspx)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 04, 2010, 11:11:31 AM
Has the NME article not been posted yet???
http://bit.ly/a2XCvB   (http://bit.ly/a2XCvB)
http://bit.ly/cfh7hH   (http://bit.ly/cfh7hH)
http://bit.ly/bOWbDo  (http://bit.ly/bOWbDo)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Linde on October 04, 2010, 11:32:16 AM
Just read it, thanks Lala!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 04, 2010, 12:46:22 PM
It was posted in the Photos and Graphics thread earlier.

Ahhh....I wouldn't have looked there...sorry
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on October 04, 2010, 08:10:34 PM
Has the NME article not been posted yet???
[url]http://bit.ly/a2XCvB [/url]  ([url]http://bit.ly/a2XCvB[/url])
[url]http://bit.ly/cfh7hH [/url]  ([url]http://bit.ly/cfh7hH[/url])
[url]http://bit.ly/bOWbDo[/url]  ([url]http://bit.ly/bOWbDo[/url])



That article is the best thing I've read in quite a period of time. So, a joyous thank you is given to you. :) The last line is brilliant: "Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden are simply out to f*ck with everyone. Seriously." :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: One Brain on October 14, 2010, 04:10:59 PM
http://www.thevine.com.au/music/interviews/mgmt-_-interview20101014.aspx (http://www.thevine.com.au/music/interviews/mgmt-_-interview20101014.aspx)  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: kristeenuh on October 15, 2010, 12:46:08 AM
I can't believe he used the word "Bendrew" in conversation. :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on October 15, 2010, 07:58:18 AM
(http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/1120/nme.png)

(http://mgmtforum.com/Smileys/default/rolleyes.gif)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 15, 2010, 08:06:05 AM
I wonder which "duo" she wants to hug....Will and James?  Matt and Andrew?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ElectricalProcess on October 15, 2010, 08:49:34 AM
I hope it hasn't already been posted.
http://www.20minutes.fr/article/606027/chat-vous-interviewez-groupe-mgmt (http://www.20minutes.fr/article/606027/chat-vous-interviewez-groupe-mgmt)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: NowLetsHaveSomeFun on October 15, 2010, 09:28:59 AM
Cheers for sharing.

I like that interview. Not often you get Ben on his own.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Jenneh on October 15, 2010, 02:25:42 PM
That article in NME gives the band such a good live review but then after reading it I feel that it was negative but only because of the way they commented on the fans :(
I feel so bad for them, wasn't as bad as that in Leeds at all
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 15, 2010, 02:27:25 PM
That article in NME gives the band such a good live review but then after reading it I feel that it was negative but only because of the way they commented on the fans :(
I feel so bad for them, wasn't as bad as that in Leeds at all

The thing that annoyed me is that if someone just sort of scans the article, they're going to perceive it as a bad review. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on October 15, 2010, 03:03:16 PM
That article in NME gives the band such a good live review but then after reading it I feel that it was negative but only because of the way they commented on the fans :(
I feel so bad for them, wasn't as bad as that in Leeds at all

I think that story was only isolated to the show they played in England. In august when I saw them in Toronto, the venue was so packed you could barely move and there was NO way anyone would be able to walk to the front. Anyone whose been to a concert of theirs knows that not only is the show itself amazing but theres just this crazy vibe with everyone throughout the whole show. Like dancing with people you don't know and everyone singing along just like EVERYONE having a blast. It was for sure one of the best experiences Ive ever had. Its sad the writer didn't get to see that side of their shows :( 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on October 15, 2010, 03:21:44 PM
I hope it hasn't already been posted.
[url]http://www.20minutes.fr/article/606027/chat-vous-interviewez-groupe-mgmt[/url] ([url]http://www.20minutes.fr/article/606027/chat-vous-interviewez-groupe-mgmt[/url])


Can anyone translate this or know where I can find a translation? I understand a little bit but not all :-\
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 15, 2010, 03:44:31 PM
That article in NME gives the band such a good live review but then after reading it I feel that it was negative but only because of the way they commented on the fans :(
I feel so bad for them, wasn't as bad as that in Leeds at all

I think that story was only isolated to the show they played in England. In august when I saw them in Toronto, the venue was so packed you could barely move and there was NO way anyone would be able to walk to the front. Anyone whose been to a concert of theirs knows that not only is the show itself amazing but theres just this crazy vibe with everyone throughout the whole show. Like dancing with people you don't know and everyone singing along just like EVERYONE having a blast. It was for sure one of the best experiences Ive ever had. Its sad the writer didn't get to see that side of their shows :( 

It was the three shows in London.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Floss on October 16, 2010, 04:36:12 PM
i went to that gig and it was amazing... i just ignored the stupid ones in the crowd and sang my heart out! but then again..i'm a genuine fan.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 16, 2010, 05:17:18 PM
i went to that gig and it was amazing... i just ignored the stupid ones in the crowd and sang my heart out! but then again..i'm a genuine fan.

I know what you mean...the Memphis show was like that last year but I was in my own little zone. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on October 21, 2010, 06:15:48 AM
i am almost certain this one has yet to be posted...
enjoy!
http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT (http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 21, 2010, 06:57:38 AM
i am almost certain this one has yet to be posted...
enjoy!
[url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url] ([url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url])


What a strange piece.  I really hate it when writers paraphrase artist yet still present them as quotes.  I just don't understand why they do it.  It's english-no paraphrasing necessary.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on October 21, 2010, 09:13:39 AM
He likes Border Collies!!  :-* :-* :-* :-*
That is a great article.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 21, 2010, 09:22:02 AM
i am almost certain this one has yet to be posted...
enjoy!
[url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url] ([url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url])


What a strange piece.  I really hate it when writers paraphrase artist yet still present them as quotes.  I just don't understand why they do it.  It's english-no paraphrasing necessary.


Yeah - was funny/odd seeing the lack of contractions. There are so many dialects/norms in English though - I guess it's kind of like how British papers/mags will put in "mum" or "telly" in quotes by Americans, so that it doesn't look weird to their local readers; maybe that's just how they roll in Oz?




I guess so...It just offends me that they use quotation signs and it clearly isn't a quote.  I guess it's probably just scary/creepy that I've read so many articles that I immediately know when it isn't actually Andrew's voice.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on October 22, 2010, 04:15:39 PM
This is audio interview by YNotRadio with Ben and Andrew from August, sorry if this has been posted
http://www.swift.fm/YNotRadio/song/58812/ (http://www.swift.fm/YNotRadio/song/58812/)

and lollapalooza Andrew, Will and Matt
http://blogs.1077theend.com/aharms/2010/08/08/mgmt-interview/ (http://blogs.1077theend.com/aharms/2010/08/08/mgmt-interview/)

and a short note    http://www.scenemagazine.com.au/index.php/section-table/70-music-electronic/1087-mgmt-interview (http://www.scenemagazine.com.au/index.php/section-table/70-music-electronic/1087-mgmt-interview)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on October 22, 2010, 05:25:30 PM
This is audio interview by YNotRadio with Ben and Andrew from August, sorry if this has been posted
[url]http://www.swift.fm/YNotRadio/song/58812/[/url] ([url]http://www.swift.fm/YNotRadio/song/58812/[/url])

and lollapalooza Andrew, Will and Matt
[url]http://blogs.1077theend.com/aharms/2010/08/08/mgmt-interview/[/url] ([url]http://blogs.1077theend.com/aharms/2010/08/08/mgmt-interview/[/url])

and a short note    [url]http://www.scenemagazine.com.au/index.php/section-table/70-music-electronic/1087-mgmt-interview[/url] ([url]http://www.scenemagazine.com.au/index.php/section-table/70-music-electronic/1087-mgmt-interview[/url])

thank you! :D I hadn't seen two of them. footage exists of Andrew surfing, thats all I need to know :P
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 22, 2010, 07:17:59 PM
This is audio interview by YNotRadio with Ben and Andrew from August, sorry if this has been posted
[url]http://www.swift.fm/YNotRadio/song/58812/[/url] ([url]http://www.swift.fm/YNotRadio/song/58812/[/url])

and lollapalooza Andrew, Will and Matt
[url]http://blogs.1077theend.com/aharms/2010/08/08/mgmt-interview/[/url] ([url]http://blogs.1077theend.com/aharms/2010/08/08/mgmt-interview/[/url])

and a short note    [url]http://www.scenemagazine.com.au/index.php/section-table/70-music-electronic/1087-mgmt-interview[/url] ([url]http://www.scenemagazine.com.au/index.php/section-table/70-music-electronic/1087-mgmt-interview[/url])

thank you! :D I had'nt seen two of them. footage exists of Andrew surfing, thats all I need to know :P

 :-X
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on October 23, 2010, 06:42:14 AM
Hi, here's some article from Oct 21  http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-plays-ruth-eckerd-hall/1129069 (http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-plays-ruth-eckerd-hall/1129069)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on October 24, 2010, 12:57:03 AM
i am almost certain this one has yet to be posted...
enjoy!
[url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url] ([url]http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/25950/MGMT[/url])


What a strange piece.  I really hate it when writers paraphrase artist yet still present them as quotes.  I just don't understand why they do it.  It's english-no paraphrasing necessary.


Yeah - was funny/odd seeing the lack of contractions. There are so many dialects/norms in English though - I guess it's kind of like how British papers/mags will put in "mum" or "telly" in quotes by Americans, so that it doesn't look weird to their local readers; maybe that's just how they roll in Oz?




I guess so...It just offends me that they use quotation signs and it clearly isn't a quote.  I guess it's probably just scary/creepy that I've read so many articles that I immediately know when it isn't actually Andrew's voice.


They weird quotation signs around what were clearly not quotes is just something dodgy the writer did.

And Boo, yes, that is a little creepy. But also kind of cool, because it's like an extra sense.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on October 26, 2010, 03:05:38 PM
I just found this, im sorry if its already been posted somewhere.

http://www.cw.ua.edu/2010/10/26/mgmt%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%9Coracular-spectacular%E2%80%9D-as-generational-statement/
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 26, 2010, 03:15:14 PM
I just found this, im sorry if its already been posted somewhere.

[url]http://www.cw.ua.edu/2010/10/26/mgmt%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%9Coracular-spectacular%E2%80%9D-as-generational-statement/[/url]


Thanks for posting.

I wonder why someone would chose to write a piece about an album after listening to 3 of the 10 songs?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on October 26, 2010, 03:30:15 PM
I just found this, im sorry if its already been posted somewhere.

[url]http://www.cw.ua.edu/2010/10/26/mgmt%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%9Coracular-spectacular%E2%80%9D-as-generational-statement/[/url]


Thanks for posting.

I wonder why someone would chose to write a piece about and album after listening to 3 of the 10 songs?

I know, its really quite sad because it would be a different article if they took the time to take in the album as a whole.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on October 26, 2010, 06:20:12 PM
That lad called MGMT hipsters. :( That made me quite sad.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 26, 2010, 06:31:33 PM
That lad called MGMT hipsters. :( That made me quite sad.

Yeah...the first red flag of the article is the first sentence.  I knew "going in" that the author knew very little about MGMT.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on October 26, 2010, 07:18:25 PM
That lad called MGMT hipsters. :( That made me quite sad.

Yeah...the first red flag of the article is the first sentence.  I knew "going in" that the author knew very little about MGMT.

Yeah, I see what you mean. And it really showed its true colors, only 6 of the 15 paragraphs concerned MGMT. The rest was just some rant and repeated nonsense about hipsters. Do you honestly think I care what art is to hipsters?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 28, 2010, 10:04:40 AM
a little review from last night...Andrew is now, "Scrabble-licious?"
http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786 (http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on October 28, 2010, 10:37:38 AM
Ooooooo Freddy the flute from H.R. Pufnstuff....LOL
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: fido on October 28, 2010, 03:25:33 PM
a little review from last night...Andrew is now, "Scrabble-licious?"
[url]http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786[/url] ([url]http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786[/url])


lol i hope he likes to play scrabble because my bro and i do whenever we're together and we made a dream list of scrabble partners (we're kind of dorks) and Andrew's on it of course  8) 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on October 29, 2010, 08:36:50 PM
a little review from last night...Andrew is now, "Scrabble-licious?"
[url]http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786[/url] ([url]http://www.tampabay.com/features/music/mgmt-adds-its-own-groove-to-the-pop-scene/1130786[/url])



Hahaha, I like "Scrabble-licious"

But a nice review that doesn't complain about the crowd, or the sound being off, or the stage presence not being enough.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mouret on November 02, 2010, 07:52:04 AM
"10 Best Moments of Voodoo Music Experience:"

Best Costumes: MGMT

Halloween did not pass unnoticed by the men of MGMT. They costumed as characters from Scooby-Doo. Singer Andrew VanWyngarden sported a long orange wig and pink tights as the foxy Daphne. Keyboardist Ben Goldwasser was the brainy Velma. Guitarist James Richardson donned a full-body Scooby-Doo get-up. By comparison, bassist Matthew Asti and drummer Will Berman got off relatively easy as Shaggy and Fred, respectively. "Nobody ever thinks to ask, 'How are you, Scooby-Doo?'" VanWyngarden observed.

Richardson addressed a fan down front wearing a striped red and white shirt and round glasses. "Hey, Waldo -- maybe you should hide yourself better. Where's Waldo? He's right there in the front row." VanWyngarden batted away errant locks of faux hair, but otherwise the costumes did not impede their ability to render tidy psychedelic pop. They scooted through "Electric Feel" and led a mini-dance party for "Kids." Scooby-Doo, it turns out, is a damn good guitar player.

http://www.spin.com/articles/10-best-moments-voodoo-music-experience
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on November 08, 2010, 02:39:45 PM
American Songwriter + pictures
MGMT Reveals Third Album Title In Nashville  http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/ (http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Someonesmissing on November 08, 2010, 02:50:07 PM
Self-titled third album
 :o
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on November 08, 2010, 05:52:23 PM
Oh that's I what missed today LOL
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 08, 2010, 06:09:08 PM
Oh that's I what missed today LOL

I smell a piss take
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: kristeenuh on November 08, 2010, 07:51:55 PM
I remember when I first started watching/reading interviews with them and I could never tell if they were joking about shit or not. Those were the days.... of pure confusion.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on November 08, 2010, 08:12:07 PM
American Songwriter + pictures
MGMT Reveals Third Album Title In Nashville  [url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/[/url] ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/[/url])

idunno, but I think their probably kidding. In the interview they dont seem to be taking themselves too seriously :-\
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 08, 2010, 08:13:04 PM
American Songwriter + pictures
MGMT Reveals Third Album Title In Nashville  [url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/[/url] ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/11/mgmt-reveals-third-album-title/[/url])

idunno, but I think their probably kidding. In the interview they dont seem to be taking themselves too seriously :-\


totes agree
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on November 08, 2010, 08:48:48 PM
It's kind of a 50/50 believing thing for me. The whole line "Yeah, we're not joking," makes me think they are joking. But what if they were joking, but then kind of really considered it because they know it would throw people off because they knew they were joking. Then they would take back joking, to joke around with people who expect them to joke. My head hurts now.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on November 09, 2010, 01:54:11 PM
pure sarcasm  8)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on November 10, 2010, 04:35:53 PM
Fans To Choose Tracks For New Beck Release http://www.rttnews.com/Content/EntertainmentNews.aspx?Section=2&Id=1473344&SM=1 (http://www.rttnews.com/Content/EntertainmentNews.aspx?Section=2&Id=1473344&SM=1)
I've already voted :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Coralie on November 12, 2010, 04:13:57 PM
By Sam Parvin and Eileen Tilson; http://www.atlantamusicguide.com/2010/11/10/qa-with-andrew-vanwyngarde-from-mgmt-at-moogfest-in-asheville/

Andrew VanWyngarde, from NYC mega-band MGMT, is not your average rockstar. His hands shook during the interview where he was doodling aimlessly on a paper cup.  Wearing a fuzzy hoodie, his eyes barely met my gaze.  Andrew was not pretentious or too “uber-cool,” even if he does live in Brooklyn Heights. He was genuinely gentle.  Coming to life to show us his mini- binoculars, made from ivory, that he had found at an antique shop in Asheville. He got even more excited to show us, that when you look into the light with the Barbie-sized binoculars to see mini-pictures of 1920′s Paris. Here is the bits we finally got out of him about the music.

During your first few years as a MGMT, there was a lot of fast and heavy awards and accolades. How has that changed your creative process?

Well, we have had less time to hole up in a studio and create music, since we have been on tour a lot, but I don’t think it has effected our creative process. With the second album, we still wrote and recorded the same way we did with the first, we were just able to rent a little nicer equipment.

I read an article that said that with Congratulations, you guys wanted to go in the completely opposite direction from your first album, is that true?

That’s just absolutely not true. The biggest difference between the two albums is the emotions involved with the albums. The first one had this sort of post-apocalyptic, mystical, kids on the beach sort of thing with a little bit of label paranoia, cause we were a little freaked out about signing with Columbia. And the second album is a less up in the clouds. It deals with more real emotions and real life stuff, and much more ambiguously personal. I don’t know why people think because we did something different on our second album, means that we didn’t like our first album. I think we are just the type of people that like to change things up.

So we are here for MoogFest, has the modular synth, or any Moog products effected your music and if so, how?

Ben and I first bonded over “making noises” and it first it was just on the computer, but then we started taking classes, and really learning experimental music and circuitry. We bonded over synths, and both have our favorites. We definitely have used Moog synths, but Ben is learning to write his own plug ins and getting really into computers, so we really aren’t using any right now.

What are your expectations for career?

I would like a long career. If we had a box set of our music that would be cool. I like the fact that our music can be interpreted differently by a different types of people, makes the music last longer.

Steve Lillywhite was quoted saying “’Artists that push boundaries should always be applauded and MGMT do it better than most.” Is there any producer that you would like to work with?

Wow, that’s really flattering that he said said… I know I have always wanted to work with Brian Eno and Sonic Boom.

What are you going to be for Halloween?

I am going as Daphne fro Scooby Doo, I don’t mind dressing in drag.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on November 20, 2010, 03:26:18 PM
So I found the interview this picture of Andrew and Will is from:
(http://s3.amazonaws.com/data.tumblr.com/tumblr_lc78myvVqH1qcyeugo1_1280.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=0RYTHV9YYQ4W5Q3HQMG2&Expires=1290370916&Signature=bmN%2Fs3Iu674nNVVznRVaaSh8UDo%3D)

It's only an audio interview and it's mostly dubbed over in French but you can hear both Will and Andrew talking occasionally.

http://www.lemouv.com/evenement/le-mouv-au-fuji-rock-festival-japon

Click on the link under "mardi 3 août"

edit: I should probably also mention that their interview is in the second half of the audio clip. Vampire Weekend's is in the first half. :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on November 21, 2010, 07:09:26 PM
Sorry to double post but I just found this article from Surfing Magazine. I don't think it's been posted before but I apologize if it has.

http://www.surfingmagazine.com/interview/a-moment-amoung-the-famous/


A Moment Amoung The Famous

Encounters with Rob Machado and MGMT
By Travis Ferré

This is weird. It’s 2:00 p.m. on Friday afternoon in New York City. Gotham. The greatest congregation of humanity in all the world. It’s nice outside. 72 degrees. I love it here.

I’m the editor of a big fancy surf magazine. I’ve been scheduled for a field trip of the city with The Drifter himself, Rob Machado. We’re going to stroll through the new High Line Park. A skyscraper lookout. An interview. Perhaps a piece of pizza with the lead singer of MGMT. PR, baby.

“Who are all these people?” Rob’s handlers ask me. They’re constantly shuffling Rob around and looking nervously at their watches. A member of his entourage bluntly informs my friends that they aren’t invited any further than this. Sorry guys. Keep drifting. Now it’s just me and photog Tom Carey. After a few nervous minutes, Tom and I get chance to say hello to Rob as we power walk to the pizza shop.

“Just cruising man,” Rob tells us, sweet as pie, his scraggly mound of hair bouncing. “Been touring the city, doing press for a few days. CNN. ESPN. SPIN Magazine. You name it.”

Rob is down to earth, but he’s not drifting at all. He’s on a leash, getting pulled about by powerful people in suits. One of them speaks up now, talking about Bob Dylan, trying to be poignant or something.

“This is Greenwich Village, where Dylan would pop up back in the day and play shows,” he says. “All the greats played around here.”
Neat.

Dusty record shops and thrift stores line the streets. Hipster Mecca. People are spilling into the streets. We find the pizza shop and prepare to force an interview.

Rob, Tom and I sit at the end of the table and chat amongst ourselves. The entourage sits at the other end of the table. They scare me.

"Oh it’s a lot different than Drifting,” says Rob with a sly grin, shuffling through his deck of memories. Drifting was Rob’s first profile film. The Drifter is his new one. It looks like the stuff of Hollywood, not a surf vid. I guess times have changed. Rob has definitely changed.

Then in walks a 26-year-old kid in an unbuttoned plaid shirt. A gym class dropout. A fourth period buddy. He’s the famous, fabulous singer from MGMT. “I’m Andrew,” he says, shaking everyone’s hand gently. “Can I get a pitcher of Pepsi?”

“Wow,” says one of the entourage. “The last time I saw you, you had on a dress in front of fifty thousand people.”

But Andrew doesn’t act like a rock star. Rob doesn’t act like a film star. They’re both pretty normal, actually. Andrew tells us he’s learning to surf. He’s been to Maroubra, Kauai, and Malibu.

“Really?” Rob asks. “You learned to surf in those spots?”

“Yeah. I’m my Wolf-Brother’s Keeper.”

Things go swimmingly. Rob promises Andrew a Dumpster Diver surfboard, a new wettie, and a few secrets for the next time he’s in Cardiff.

It’s all groovy. It’s not weird. I thought it’d be weird.

“Wanna see some good record shops?” Andrew asks us as we head out of the pizza shop. Even in street clothes, he and Rob are both stopped several times for photos and autographs. We break free from Rob’s handlers as they hunt down more cameras and voice recorders for The Drifter. We wander the streets, peeking into shops and shooting the breeze. Andrew tells us, “This is where Bob Dylan used to play all the time.”

Edit - Here are the two pictures that went with the interview:
(http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/2243/robny.jpg)

(http://img33.imageshack.us/img33/7684/newyorkcareyt01011.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 21, 2010, 07:12:14 PM
It has, but it's a winner!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: nano on November 22, 2010, 07:15:06 AM
^^ It's so cute - I'm actually still smiling.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: fido on November 22, 2010, 10:23:54 PM
I had never heard of Rob Machado..I wonder if we're related  8)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on November 22, 2010, 11:12:05 PM
Sorry to double post but I just found this article from Surfing Magazine. I don't think it's been posted before but I apologize if it has.

[url]http://www.surfingmagazine.com/interview/a-moment-amoung-the-famous/[/url]


A Moment Amoung The Famous

Encounters with Rob Machado and MGMT
By Travis Ferré

This is weird. It’s 2:00 p.m. on Friday afternoon in New York City. Gotham. The greatest congregation of humanity in all the world. It’s nice outside. 72 degrees. I love it here.

I’m the editor of a big fancy surf magazine. I’ve been scheduled for a field trip of the city with The Drifter himself, Rob Machado. We’re going to stroll through the new High Line Park. A skyscraper lookout. An interview. Perhaps a piece of pizza with the lead singer of MGMT. PR, baby.

“Who are all these people?” Rob’s handlers ask me. They’re constantly shuffling Rob around and looking nervously at their watches. A member of his entourage bluntly informs my friends that they aren’t invited any further than this. Sorry guys. Keep drifting. Now it’s just me and photog Tom Carey. After a few nervous minutes, Tom and I get chance to say hello to Rob as we power walk to the pizza shop.

“Just cruising man,” Rob tells us, sweet as pie, his scraggly mound of hair bouncing. “Been touring the city, doing press for a few days. CNN. ESPN. SPIN Magazine. You name it.”

Rob is down to earth, but he’s not drifting at all. He’s on a leash, getting pulled about by powerful people in suits. One of them speaks up now, talking about Bob Dylan, trying to be poignant or something.

“This is Greenwich Village, where Dylan would pop up back in the day and play shows,” he says. “All the greats played around here.”
Neat.

Dusty record shops and thrift stores line the streets. Hipster Mecca. People are spilling into the streets. We find the pizza shop and prepare to force an interview.

Rob, Tom and I sit at the end of the table and chat amongst ourselves. The entourage sits at the other end of the table. They scare me.

"Oh it’s a lot different than Drifting,” says Rob with a sly grin, shuffling through his deck of memories. Drifting was Rob’s first profile film. The Drifter is his new one. It looks like the stuff of Hollywood, not a surf vid. I guess times have changed. Rob has definitely changed.

Then in walks a 26-year-old kid in an unbuttoned plaid shirt. A gym class dropout. A fourth period buddy. He’s the famous, fabulous singer from MGMT. “I’m Andrew,” he says, shaking everyone’s hand gently. “Can I get a pitcher of Pepsi?”

“Wow,” says one of the entourage. “The last time I saw you, you had on a dress in front of fifty thousand people.”

But Andrew doesn’t act like a rock star. Rob doesn’t act like a film star. They’re both pretty normal, actually. Andrew tells us he’s learning to surf. He’s been to Maroubra, Kauai, and Malibu.

“Really?” Rob asks. “You learned to surf in those spots?”

“Yeah. I’m my Wolf-Brother’s Keeper.”

Things go swimmingly. Rob promises Andrew a Dumpster Diver surfboard, a new wettie, and a few secrets for the next time he’s in Cardiff.

It’s all groovy. It’s not weird. I thought it’d be weird.

“Wanna see some good record shops?” Andrew asks us as we head out of the pizza shop. Even in street clothes, he and Rob are both stopped several times for photos and autographs. We break free from Rob’s handlers as they hunt down more cameras and voice recorders for The Drifter. We wander the streets, peeking into shops and shooting the breeze. Andrew tells us, “This is where Bob Dylan used to play all the time.”

Edit - Here are the two pictures that went with the interview:
([url]http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/2243/robny.jpg[/url])

([url]http://img33.imageshack.us/img33/7684/newyorkcareyt01011.jpg[/url])

thanks for this :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on November 23, 2010, 12:55:41 PM
Hi! I found an interview with Ben . He talks a little bit about their relationships with Columbia and stuff. Enjoy!
(I hope it wasn't posted yet)http://thebadpennyblog.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/mgmts-ben-goldwasser-on-new-lp-doing-laundry-and-his-favorite-cover-of-an-mgmt-song/ (http://thebadpennyblog.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/mgmts-ben-goldwasser-on-new-lp-doing-laundry-and-his-favorite-cover-of-an-mgmt-song/)
also Wah Do Dem on dvd http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2010/11/05/indie-film-by-fleischner-06-now-on-dvd/ (http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2010/11/05/indie-film-by-fleischner-06-now-on-dvd/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on November 23, 2010, 05:40:26 PM
This is kind of old but I haven't heard of it
Klaxons: "Righton said the band’s scrapped songs were reminiscent of tracks on MGMT’s second album ‘Congratulations’.

“It was fairly similar to the MGMT record... which is still a really good record, but it's not the commercial record the last one was,” he said.http://www.gigwise.com/news/56566/Klaxons-Our-Scrapped-Album-Was-Like-MGMTs-New-Record (http://www.gigwise.com/news/56566/Klaxons-Our-Scrapped-Album-Was-Like-MGMTs-New-Record)

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 23, 2010, 07:12:47 PM
This is kind of old but I haven't heard of it
Klaxons: "Righton said the band’s scrapped songs were reminiscent of tracks on MGMT’s second album ‘Congratulations’.

“It was fairly similar to the MGMT record... which is still a really good record, but it's not the commercial record the last one was,” he said.[url]http://www.gigwise.com/news/56566/Klaxons-Our-Scrapped-Album-Was-Like-MGMTs-New-Record[/url] ([url]http://www.gigwise.com/news/56566/Klaxons-Our-Scrapped-Album-Was-Like-MGMTs-New-Record[/url])




ugh....old wounds.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: kristeenuh on November 24, 2010, 11:10:49 AM
Klaxons with a Congrats sound? That does sound odd. I'm very curious as to what the scrapped stuff sounds like though.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 26, 2010, 04:57:06 PM
Does anyone happen to remember the article that was an interview with Will talking about making Congrats?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on November 26, 2010, 04:59:39 PM
About this sounded announcement reportedly from MGMT before they released their second album in early summer. The colorful and hyped New York duo were tired of being a hit band that people only connected with the two songs "Kids" and "Time To Pretend" from their 2008-debut "Oracular Spectacular".

But according to MGMT-member Ben Goldwasser was this statement just one of many that were taken out of thin air and fabricated by sensation seeking media, who did not understand what had been the group's hit-flair.
"Obviously we are pleased that we had two good songs that were big hits," he explains with serious emotion when P3 meet him and the duo's second member Andrew VanWyngarden of their management office in the middle of the busy Broadway in his hometown of New York. Office has stopped well with magazines and posters, where the duo are pictured.

"But we will not sell out. It is important for us to put personal integrity above selling out and we will not just make the songs pleaser masses ".

"The audience for example coming to concerts now, is because of our music, and not because they mistakenly believe they must to some Daft Punk concert," stresses Andrew.

Commercial Suicide
As the duo released their second album "Congratulations" in early summer 2010 were there any new rules of engagement, and MGMT's many fans had to scout far beyond the type catchy tunes they did on the first plate.
Follow-up was far more cryptic and colorful celebration was replaced by almost psychedelic melodies. From being a triumphant debut band, they met a wall of criticism, and people did not understand what they were doing to do about their careers.

"Maybe it's commercial suicide not to do so as more people turn to and identify with, but there are just so many bands who kill their careers by constantly trying to recreate exactly what they started out with."

"We do not see ourselves as a band that just wants to be bigger and bigger and playing arena concerts. It may well be that we do not immediately become as rich or successful, because we have taken a harder path."

Keep a short leash
One of the stories have stuck to MGMT since the release of "Congratulations" is that they will no longer have the same creative freedom that they have been previously assigned, and that their label did not accept their udsyrede ideas anymore. They have recently quoted as saying that now they are pressured to make a very different third album due to poor sales.

This story stems, however, according to Andrew VanWyngarden in their use of sarcasm when they are interviewed and has no basis in reality.
"We are often sarcastic, but it does not work in our favor always. Our sarcasm is unfortunately used to present ourselves in a certain way.
Of course, we had a feeling that we had two songs that would become as big as "Kids" and "Time To Pretend" - so naive, we did not. I am convinced that people are still interested in what we do because we continue to write good music and not merely that we had two real successful songs, "says Andrew VanWyngarden.

- MGMT visiting Denmark 4th December where they will give a concert at the venue Vega in Copenhagen.


Sank you, google.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 27, 2010, 04:03:15 AM
Does anyone happen to remember the article that was an interview with Will talking about making Congrats?


Are you talking about this (http://indianapolis.metromix.com/music/article/under-new-mgmt/1996789/content) one?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 27, 2010, 04:34:12 AM
Does anyone happen to remember the article that was an interview with Will talking about making Congrats?


Are you talking about this ([url]http://indianapolis.metromix.com/music/article/under-new-mgmt/1996789/content[/url]) one?


I found it yesterday-Thanks!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 27, 2010, 06:29:45 PM
Andrew speaks with Slovenia press (http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sl&u=http://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek&ei=K3PvTKHEDKmKnAe6jM3QCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBkQ7gEwAA&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dhttp://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26hs%3DsKF%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official)
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on November 27, 2010, 07:07:51 PM
Ariel Pink, hmmm?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on November 27, 2010, 07:08:59 PM
Andrew speaks with Slovenia press ([url]http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sl&u=http://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek&ei=K3PvTKHEDKmKnAe6jM3QCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBkQ7gEwAA&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dhttp://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26hs%3DsKF%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official[/url])


Thanks for sharing that.....not too much got "lost in translation" LOL
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 27, 2010, 07:53:01 PM
Andrew speaks with Slovenia press ([url]http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sl&u=http://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek&ei=K3PvTKHEDKmKnAe6jM3QCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBkQ7gEwAA&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dhttp://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/sarkozy-je-dvolicen-192096/clanek%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26hs%3DsKF%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official[/url])


Thanks for sharing that.....not too much got "lost in translation" LOL


You're welcome. Yeah it's sometimes really hard to tell what they were actually trying to get across but this one was pretty straightforward. 
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: alessandra on November 27, 2010, 09:13:43 PM
Ariel Pink, hmmm?
that's where i got a little lost. I wasn't sure if that meant that MGMT inspires Ariel Pink or if Ariel Pink inspires MGMT. I'm going with the latter.
Title: Re: Your blood is all around you now (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on November 27, 2010, 09:24:58 PM
Ariel Pink, hmmm?
that's where i got a little lost. I wasn't sure if that meant that MGMT inspires Ariel Pink or if Ariel Pink inspires MGMT. I'm going with the latter.
It just made me lol.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on November 28, 2010, 05:21:15 PM
Another interview from Maribor

Bringing sunshine to Slovenia (dunno about that it was foggy and FUCKING cold!)

Yesterday, you finally have arrived in Slovenia or in Maribor. What are your first impressions?
Andrew: As we arrived at night, we did not see much. The center of Maribor looks very cool, especially since it snowed yesterday. And as we heard the oldest vine in the world grows here. We saw the river too ...

Have you tried Slovenian wine?
Andrew: Yeah, well Ben did (laughs). They offered us a special spirit drink that looked very dark...

Made from blueberries? Blueberry?
Andrew: Yeah, that was it, I guess.
Ben: We drank a local red wine.

How much?
Ben: It was very strange, because I drank and drank, but because I was so tired from the trip and the time difference, it did not even have an effect on me.

How have you guys managed to come right today - the day of the concert, which is open air - and didn`t have trouble with snow? It snowed yesterday and it`s once again predicted for tomorrow ...
Andrew: I do not know, given the fact that wherever we play we bring the rain and apparently this rule does not apply to Slovenia, as we brought the sun. Today is a very nice day, huh?

Have you heard any other group, which now play?
Andrew: We heard Italian funk band that played before us ... What`s their name? (One of the organizers help, Op. P.) Did! Very nice guys who have similar influences as we - a lot of teams from the New York scene 80th years.

This is the first concert of your European tour. Where will you still go?
Ben: The next stop is Germany, then Scandinavia. Followed by Spain, Portugal, Austria, France, Italy, ... I`t gonna be fun.

Do you have preferred European location to play?
Ben: Berlin is one of my favorite concert sites. We haven`t played for a long time there.

Are there differences between audiences in different countries?
Andrew: I don`t thikn we have enough mileage to judge. We've never performed in Norway, for example ... The German audiences are usually really good.

Sorry, but (pointing at a black-and-white striped wallpaper Poster Party with a Cause, op. P), were you involved in the desinging of this poster, it looks like something you guys would make (laughter)? I`ve been looking at this background for too long, but because you`re sitting right here ...
Ben: How do they call this?
Andrew: Razzle-Dazzle!
Ben: Really?

Razzle-Dazzle?
Andrew: Yeah, that was used on ships ... and if you don`t look close enough, you wouldn`t even know it`s there.

Will you play more stuff from the new album, Congratulations or from the previous Oracular Spectacular at the concert?
Andrew: Half-half.

Even some covers, special songs?
Andrew: Also ... Each song is special.

When do you make the final set list? Quickly before the concert, or much earlier?
Andrew: An hour before the concert or something like that.

And what is the decisive factor?
Andrew: I ask the band what they would like to play again, then write a list ... And when Ben suggests anything I change it (both burst out laughing, op. P).

What songs receive best response?
Andrew: Electric Feel, Time To Pretend ... Those who are the most popular and most people like.

What are you guys like best?
Andrew: I like playing long and slow songs, like Siberian Breaks. And you, Ben?
Ben: Time To Pretend.
Andrew: Oh, you sold your soul (laughs)!

Since the festival's charitable note there is no official after-partyja and since you`re leaving tomorrow - will you go out and test out Maribor`s nightlife?
Andrew: Actually we aren`t the types that go into clubs ... We rather go to a bar with good music. Or in those clubs which allow us to loudly listen to our iPods. We look for bars that let us be the DJs (laughs).

Maybe you could share the most crazy tour story of this last tour?
Andrew: OK, we dressed in Scooby Doo costumes, but that`s pretty normal ... (Long pause, op. P) ... Yeah, in Florida we wore manatees (sea cow) costumes, they are similar to walruses.

Are they similar to sea lions?
Andrew: Yeah ...

And you walked around dressed as that because ... ?
Andrew: It was Halloween and we went trick-or-treating.

Andrew looks at Žurnal`s microphone sponge, which they both admired before the interview and called it funky.

Would you like to keep the funky sponge?
Andrew: Could we really? Thank you. Wow - I`ll use it every day!

It has many uses ...
Andrew: Yeah! Bath sponge, condom (laughter) ...


I`ll write about the concert tomorrow, k? If anyone is still interested...


Short review from Maribor:

Despite the injury professionally executed concert

Although it was snowing the day before, as well as a day later, MGMT brought the sun to Slovenia - in an interview with Žurnal24 the frontman Andrew VanWyngarden said that they usually bring rain to their concert venues. The vocalist was in a good mood, and there was no way of telling that there was anything wrong with his arm (he recently dislocated his shoulder), although he wore a splint after the concert. The crowd was the most responsive to the most recognizable hits such as Electric Feel, Time To Pretend and Kids. Transportation and cold probably helped that the main square was attended by fewer people than expected, although there were still a few thousand.

Among the groups that came before MGMT, were the more enthusiastic Austrian Bunny Lake, but otherwise the stage hosted the local We Can not Sleep At Night, Italian DID (they were fucking horrible OMG!!), Rotor and Code.EP.

Partying with MGMT in Cinema Udarnik
Around a hundred lucky that attended the after party visited cinema Udarnik, and had a chance to see the whole band MGMT in a more relaxed atmosphere - Andrew and Ben even took over the mixing desk and tried to DJ. There was no shortage of enthusiastic teenage fangirls, following the very down-to-earth Andrew at every stage, and taking photographs with him.

The discovery of America in Maribor
MGMT may remember Slovenia after the end of the event in Udarnik, when they, at 4 am could hardly find an open restaurant with fast food (you know like a kebab shop).They were forced to opt for - believe it or not -  McDonald's.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on November 28, 2010, 06:51:20 PM
8D

This made my day, I'm sitting with this cheesy grin on my face and laughing like an idiot.   :D Pretty please write about the concert if you can :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on November 28, 2010, 08:15:01 PM
Another interview from Maribor

Bringing sunshine to Slovenia (dunno about that it was foggy and FUCKING cold!)

Yesterday, you finally have arrived in Slovenia or in Maribor. What are your first impressions?
Andrew: As we arrived at night, we did not see much. The center of Maribor looks very cool, especially since it snowed yesterday. And as we heard the oldest vine in the world grows here. We saw the river too ...

Have you tried Slovenian wine?
Andrew: Yeah, well Ben did (laughs). They offered us a special spirit drink that looked very dark...

Made from blueberries? Blueberry?
Andrew: Yeah, that was it, I guess.
Ben: We drank a local red wine.

How much?
Ben: It was very strange, because I drank and drank, but because I was so tired from the trip and the time difference, it did not even have an effect on me.

How have you guys managed to come right today - the day of the concert, which is open air - and didn`t have trouble with snow? It snowed yesterday and it`s once again predicted for tomorrow ...
Andrew: I do not know, given the fact that wherever we play we bring the rain and apparently this rule does not apply to Slovenia, as we brought the sun. Today is a very nice day, huh?

Have you heard any other group, which now play?
Andrew: We heard Italian funk band that played before us ... What`s their name? (One of the organizers help, Op. P.) Did! Very nice guys who have similar influences as we - a lot of teams from the New York scene 80th years.

This is the first concert of your European tour. Where will you still go?
Ben: The next stop is Germany, then Scandinavia. Followed by Spain, Portugal, Austria, France, Italy, ... I`t gonna be fun.

Do you have preferred European location to play?
Ben: Berlin is one of my favorite concert sites. We haven`t played for a long time there.

Are there differences between audiences in different countries?
Andrew: I don`t thikn we have enough mileage to judge. We've never performed in Norway, for example ... The German audiences are usually really good.

Sorry, but (pointing at a black-and-white striped wallpaper Poster Party with a Cause, op. P), were you involved in the desinging of this poster, it looks like something you guys would make (laughter)? I`ve been looking at this background for too long, but because you`re sitting right here ...
Ben: How do they call this?
Andrew: Razzle-Dazzle!
Ben: Really?

Razzle-Dazzle?
Andrew: Yeah, that was used on ships ... and if you don`t look close enough, you wouldn`t even know it`s there.

Will you play more stuff from the new album, Congratulations or from the previous Oracular Spectacular at the concert?
Andrew: Half-half.

Even some covers, special songs?
Andrew: Also ... Each song is special.

When do you make the final set list? Quickly before the concert, or much earlier?
Andrew: An hour before the concert or something like that.

And what is the decisive factor?
Andrew: I ask the band what they would like to play again, then write a list ... And when Ben suggests anything I change it (both burst out laughing, op. P).

What songs receive best response?
Andrew: Electric Feel, Time To Pretend ... Those who are the most popular and most people like.

What are you guys like best?
Andrew: I like playing long and slow songs, like Siberian Breaks. And you, Ben?
Ben: Time To Pretend.
Andrew: Oh, you sold your soul (laughs)!

Since the festival's charitable note there is no official after-partyja and since you`re leaving tomorrow - will you go out and test out Maribor`s nightlife?
Andrew: Actually we aren`t the types that go into clubs ... We rather go to a bar with good music. Or in those clubs which allow us to loudly listen to our iPods. We look for bars that let us be the DJs (laughs).

Maybe you could share the most crazy tour story of this last tour?
Andrew: OK, we dressed in Scooby Doo costumes, but that`s pretty normal ... (Long pause, op. P) ... Yeah, in Florida we wore manatees (sea cow) costumes, they are similar to walruses.

Are they similar to sea lions?
Andrew: Yeah ...

And you walked around dressed as that because ... ?
Andrew: It was Halloween and we went trick-or-treating.

Andrew looks at Žurnal`s microphone sponge, which they both admired before the interview and called it funky.

Would you like to keep the funky sponge?
Andrew: Could we really? Thank you. Wow - I`ll use it every day!

It has many uses ...
Andrew: Yeah! Bath sponge, condom (laughter) ...


I`ll write about the concert tomorrow, k? If anyone is still interested...


Short review from Maribor:

Despite the injury professionally executed concert

Although it was snowing the day before, as well as a day later, MGMT brought the sun to Slovenia - in an interview with Žurnal24 the frontman Andrew VanWyngarden said that they usually bring rain to their concert venues. The vocalist was in a good mood, and there was no way of telling that there was anything wrong with his arm (he recently dislocated his shoulder), although he wore a splint after the concert. The crowd was the most responsive to the most recognizable hits such as Electric Feel, Time To Pretend and Kids. Transportation and cold probably helped that the main square was attended by fewer people than expected, although there were still a few thousand.

Among the groups that came before MGMT, were the more enthusiastic Austrian Bunny Lake, but otherwise the stage hosted the local We Can not Sleep At Night, Italian DID (they were fucking horrible OMG!!), Rotor and Code.EP.

Partying with MGMT in Cinema Udarnik
Around a hundred lucky that attended the after party visited cinema Udarnik, and had a chance to see the whole band MGMT in a more relaxed atmosphere - Andrew and Ben even took over the mixing desk and tried to DJ. There was no shortage of enthusiastic teenage fangirls, following the very down-to-earth Andrew at every stage, and taking photographs with him.

The discovery of America in Maribor
MGMT may remember Slovenia after the end of the event in Udarnik, when they, at 4 am could hardly find an open restaurant with fast food (you know like a kebab shop).They were forced to opt for - believe it or not -  McDonald's.



 :-\ Andrew's still wearing a sling...
Well, it sounds like they had a fairly good show all in all! It's so good to have the guys back!! 8)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 28, 2010, 08:39:17 PM
Another interview from Maribor

Bringing sunshine to Slovenia (dunno about that it was foggy and FUCKING cold!)

Yesterday, you finally have arrived in Slovenia or in Maribor. What are your first impressions?
Andrew: As we arrived at night, we did not see much. The center of Maribor looks very cool, especially since it snowed yesterday. And as we heard the oldest vine in the world grows here. We saw the river too ...

Have you tried Slovenian wine?
Andrew: Yeah, well Ben did (laughs). They offered us a special spirit drink that looked very dark...

Made from blueberries? Blueberry?
Andrew: Yeah, that was it, I guess.
Ben: We drank a local red wine.

How much?
Ben: It was very strange, because I drank and drank, but because I was so tired from the trip and the time difference, it did not even have an effect on me.

How have you guys managed to come right today - the day of the concert, which is open air - and didn`t have trouble with snow? It snowed yesterday and it`s once again predicted for tomorrow ...
Andrew: I do not know, given the fact that wherever we play we bring the rain and apparently this rule does not apply to Slovenia, as we brought the sun. Today is a very nice day, huh?

Have you heard any other group, which now play?
Andrew: We heard Italian funk band that played before us ... What`s their name? (One of the organizers help, Op. P.) Did! Very nice guys who have similar influences as we - a lot of teams from the New York scene 80th years.

This is the first concert of your European tour. Where will you still go?
Ben: The next stop is Germany, then Scandinavia. Followed by Spain, Portugal, Austria, France, Italy, ... I`t gonna be fun.

Do you have preferred European location to play?
Ben: Berlin is one of my favorite concert sites. We haven`t played for a long time there.

Are there differences between audiences in different countries?
Andrew: I don`t thikn we have enough mileage to judge. We've never performed in Norway, for example ... The German audiences are usually really good.

Sorry, but (pointing at a black-and-white striped wallpaper Poster Party with a Cause, op. P), were you involved in the desinging of this poster, it looks like something you guys would make (laughter)? I`ve been looking at this background for too long, but because you`re sitting right here ...
Ben: How do they call this?
Andrew: Razzle-Dazzle!
Ben: Really?

Razzle-Dazzle?
Andrew: Yeah, that was used on ships ... and if you don`t look close enough, you wouldn`t even know it`s there.

Will you play more stuff from the new album, Congratulations or from the previous Oracular Spectacular at the concert?
Andrew: Half-half.

Even some covers, special songs?
Andrew: Also ... Each song is special.

When do you make the final set list? Quickly before the concert, or much earlier?
Andrew: An hour before the concert or something like that.

And what is the decisive factor?
Andrew: I ask the band what they would like to play again, then write a list ... And when Ben suggests anything I change it (both burst out laughing, op. P).

What songs receive best response?
Andrew: Electric Feel, Time To Pretend ... Those who are the most popular and most people like.

What are you guys like best?
Andrew: I like playing long and slow songs, like Siberian Breaks. And you, Ben?
Ben: Time To Pretend.
Andrew: Oh, you sold your soul (laughs)!

Since the festival's charitable note there is no official after-partyja and since you`re leaving tomorrow - will you go out and test out Maribor`s nightlife?
Andrew: Actually we aren`t the types that go into clubs ... We rather go to a bar with good music. Or in those clubs which allow us to loudly listen to our iPods. We look for bars that let us be the DJs (laughs).

Maybe you could share the most crazy tour story of this last tour?
Andrew: OK, we dressed in Scooby Doo costumes, but that`s pretty normal ... (Long pause, op. P) ... Yeah, in Florida we wore manatees (sea cow) costumes, they are similar to walruses.

Are they similar to sea lions?
Andrew: Yeah ...

And you walked around dressed as that because ... ?
Andrew: It was Halloween and we went trick-or-treating.

Andrew looks at Žurnal`s microphone sponge, which they both admired before the interview and called it funky.

Would you like to keep the funky sponge?
Andrew: Could we really? Thank you. Wow - I`ll use it every day!

It has many uses ...
Andrew: Yeah! Bath sponge, condom (laughter) ...


I`ll write about the concert tomorrow, k? If anyone is still interested...


Short review from Maribor:

Despite the injury professionally executed concert

Although it was snowing the day before, as well as a day later, MGMT brought the sun to Slovenia - in an interview with Žurnal24 the frontman Andrew VanWyngarden said that they usually bring rain to their concert venues. The vocalist was in a good mood, and there was no way of telling that there was anything wrong with his arm (he recently dislocated his shoulder), although he wore a splint after the concert. The crowd was the most responsive to the most recognizable hits such as Electric Feel, Time To Pretend and Kids. Transportation and cold probably helped that the main square was attended by fewer people than expected, although there were still a few thousand.

Among the groups that came before MGMT, were the more enthusiastic Austrian Bunny Lake, but otherwise the stage hosted the local We Can not Sleep At Night, Italian DID (they were fucking horrible OMG!!), Rotor and Code.EP.

Partying with MGMT in Cinema Udarnik
Around a hundred lucky that attended the after party visited cinema Udarnik, and had a chance to see the whole band MGMT in a more relaxed atmosphere - Andrew and Ben even took over the mixing desk and tried to DJ. There was no shortage of enthusiastic teenage fangirls, following the very down-to-earth Andrew at every stage, and taking photographs with him.

The discovery of America in Maribor
MGMT may remember Slovenia after the end of the event in Udarnik, when they, at 4 am could hardly find an open restaurant with fast food (you know like a kebab shop).They were forced to opt for - believe it or not -  McDonald's.



 :-\ Andrew's still wearing a sling...
Well, it sounds like they had a fairly good show all in all! It's so good to have the guys back!! 8)

I imagine it has to get really inflamed after a show.  I'm sure he has ice packs going too.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on November 28, 2010, 09:22:56 PM
Another interview from Maribor



 :-\ Andrew's still wearing a sling...
Well, it sounds like they had a fairly good show all in all! It's so good to have the guys back!! 8)

I imagine it has to get really inflamed after a show.  I'm sure he has ice packs going too.
I thought about that too, I bet you're right!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 28, 2010, 10:48:32 PM
Another interview from Maribor



 :-\ Andrew's still wearing a sling...
Well, it sounds like they had a fairly good show all in all! It's so good to have the guys back!! 8)

I imagine it has to get really inflamed after a show.  I'm sure he has ice packs going too.
I thought about that too, I bet you're right!
What a trooper.  Anything for the music...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on November 29, 2010, 12:32:21 AM
Another interview from Maribor

Bringing sunshine to Slovenia (dunno about that it was foggy and FUCKING cold!)

Yesterday, you finally have arrived in Slovenia or in Maribor. What are your first impressions?
Andrew: As we arrived at night, we did not see much. The center of Maribor looks very cool, especially since it snowed yesterday. And as we heard the oldest vine in the world grows here. We saw the river too ...

Have you tried Slovenian wine?
Andrew: Yeah, well Ben did (laughs). They offered us a special spirit drink that looked very dark...

Made from blueberries? Blueberry?
Andrew: Yeah, that was it, I guess.
Ben: We drank a local red wine.

How much?
Ben: It was very strange, because I drank and drank, but because I was so tired from the trip and the time difference, it did not even have an effect on me.

How have you guys managed to come right today - the day of the concert, which is open air - and didn`t have trouble with snow? It snowed yesterday and it`s once again predicted for tomorrow ...
Andrew: I do not know, given the fact that wherever we play we bring the rain and apparently this rule does not apply to Slovenia, as we brought the sun. Today is a very nice day, huh?

Have you heard any other group, which now play?
Andrew: We heard Italian funk band that played before us ... What`s their name? (One of the organizers help, Op. P.) Did! Very nice guys who have similar influences as we - a lot of teams from the New York scene 80th years.

This is the first concert of your European tour. Where will you still go?
Ben: The next stop is Germany, then Scandinavia. Followed by Spain, Portugal, Austria, France, Italy, ... I`t gonna be fun.

Do you have preferred European location to play?
Ben: Berlin is one of my favorite concert sites. We haven`t played for a long time there.

Are there differences between audiences in different countries?
Andrew: I don`t thikn we have enough mileage to judge. We've never performed in Norway, for example ... The German audiences are usually really good.

Sorry, but (pointing at a black-and-white striped wallpaper Poster Party with a Cause, op. P), were you involved in the desinging of this poster, it looks like something you guys would make (laughter)? I`ve been looking at this background for too long, but because you`re sitting right here ...
Ben: How do they call this?
Andrew: Razzle-Dazzle!
Ben: Really?

Razzle-Dazzle?
Andrew: Yeah, that was used on ships ... and if you don`t look close enough, you wouldn`t even know it`s there.

Will you play more stuff from the new album, Congratulations or from the previous Oracular Spectacular at the concert?
Andrew: Half-half.

Even some covers, special songs?
Andrew: Also ... Each song is special.

When do you make the final set list? Quickly before the concert, or much earlier?
Andrew: An hour before the concert or something like that.

And what is the decisive factor?
Andrew: I ask the band what they would like to play again, then write a list ... And when Ben suggests anything I change it (both burst out laughing, op. P).

What songs receive best response?
Andrew: Electric Feel, Time To Pretend ... Those who are the most popular and most people like.

What are you guys like best?
Andrew: I like playing long and slow songs, like Siberian Breaks. And you, Ben?
Ben: Time To Pretend.
Andrew: Oh, you sold your soul (laughs)!

Since the festival's charitable note there is no official after-partyja and since you`re leaving tomorrow - will you go out and test out Maribor`s nightlife?
Andrew: Actually we aren`t the types that go into clubs ... We rather go to a bar with good music. Or in those clubs which allow us to loudly listen to our iPods. We look for bars that let us be the DJs (laughs).

Maybe you could share the most crazy tour story of this last tour?
Andrew: OK, we dressed in Scooby Doo costumes, but that`s pretty normal ... (Long pause, op. P) ... Yeah, in Florida we wore manatees (sea cow) costumes, they are similar to walruses.

Are they similar to sea lions?
Andrew: Yeah ...

And you walked around dressed as that because ... ?
Andrew: It was Halloween and we went trick-or-treating.

Andrew looks at Žurnal`s microphone sponge, which they both admired before the interview and called it funky.

Would you like to keep the funky sponge?
Andrew: Could we really? Thank you. Wow - I`ll use it every day!

It has many uses ...
Andrew: Yeah! Bath sponge, condom (laughter) ...


I`ll write about the concert tomorrow, k? If anyone is still interested...


Short review from Maribor:

Despite the injury professionally executed concert

Although it was snowing the day before, as well as a day later, MGMT brought the sun to Slovenia - in an interview with Žurnal24 the frontman Andrew VanWyngarden said that they usually bring rain to their concert venues. The vocalist was in a good mood, and there was no way of telling that there was anything wrong with his arm (he recently dislocated his shoulder), although he wore a splint after the concert. The crowd was the most responsive to the most recognizable hits such as Electric Feel, Time To Pretend and Kids. Transportation and cold probably helped that the main square was attended by fewer people than expected, although there were still a few thousand.

Among the groups that came before MGMT, were the more enthusiastic Austrian Bunny Lake, but otherwise the stage hosted the local We Can not Sleep At Night, Italian DID (they were fucking horrible OMG!!), Rotor and Code.EP.

Partying with MGMT in Cinema Udarnik
Around a hundred lucky that attended the after party visited cinema Udarnik, and had a chance to see the whole band MGMT in a more relaxed atmosphere - Andrew and Ben even took over the mixing desk and tried to DJ. There was no shortage of enthusiastic teenage fangirls, following the very down-to-earth Andrew at every stage, and taking photographs with him.

The discovery of America in Maribor
MGMT may remember Slovenia after the end of the event in Udarnik, when they, at 4 am could hardly find an open restaurant with fast food (you know like a kebab shop).They were forced to opt for - believe it or not -  McDonald's.



Hey Voodoo - Can I ask where you found this splendid article?? Thanks for sharing by the way!!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 29, 2010, 12:41:45 AM
Another interview from Maribor



Hey Voodoo - Can I ask where you found this splendid article?? Thanks for sharing by the way!!


Yes I am also wondering about this.  I understand that the short review from Maribor towards the bottom comes from this article http://www.zurnal24.si/fotogalerije/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-193087/clanek (http://www.zurnal24.si/fotogalerije/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-193087/clanek) but where does the first part of this come from?  Thank you and looking forward to hearing about the show!  
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 29, 2010, 03:40:09 AM
(http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lcn0p5gs1l1qbahouo1_500.jpg)

Interview With James Richardson by the American Youth Philharmonic Orchestra
of which he was a member of from 1997-2001


Interviewer- How old were you when you began music, and what instrument did you play?
James- “I was always messing around on the piano for as long as I can remember. I started piano lessons when I was five or six; that was my first ʹseriousʹ instrument.”
Interviewer- What is your favorite memory from your days with AYPO?
James- “My favorite memories with AYP might be from the
year we attended the National Youth Orchestra Festival in Sarasota, Florida. We got to meet
friends from other youth orchestras, mix up and play in different ensembles with each
other. We were very proud to represent AYP and there were some great conductors there.”
Interviewer- What has been your most memorable moment with MGMT to date?
James- “My most memorable
moment with MGMT was probably opening for Radiohead in Manchester. Coming onstage in
front of a sold out arena crowd and seeing your heroes on the side, ready to watch you perform,
was pretty indescribable. We got a glimpse of what it is like to be on that level, where youʹre
playing to fifty thousand people every night.”
Interviewer- What is your role in MGMT? Give us a glimpse into the personality of the band and its
members.
James- “My role in MGMT is guitar player. Andrew and Ben are the two founding members
of the band and they made the first album before the other three of us (guitar, bass, drums) joined the band. Weʹre all going to contribute and cooperate on the new record, though. Iʹd say that weʹre all pretty easy going, fun loving people, and we donʹt take things too seriously. We are all kind of geeky and appreciate the same things.”
Interviewer- What inspires you as a musician?
James- “I find inspiration to play music everywhere around me. For me, music is connected to everything in life; itʹs part of my world view. Music is my main means of expression, and my main purpose in life, so I canʹt go without it.”
Interviewer- How has your classical training helped you with your current career path? In what
ways?
James-“My classical training helps me today in so many ways. It would be impossible to
think of playing music without it. For one thing, it makes communicating about music so
much easier. The other guys in the band are trained musicians so I can say stuff to them
like, ʺCould you clean up that dotted rhythmʺ, or ʺI think we should bring out the seventh
hereʺ, instead of being vague. But much more than that, studying classical music has enriched
my understanding of all music; knowing the history of how harmony developed gives
every chord new meaning, and thereʹs a lot of counterpoint going on in our music too. For me,
learning about all different kinds of music and comparing them with each other helps me understand and appreciate both kinds more than I ever could if I had stuck to just one.”
Interviewer- What advice would you give to AYPO musicians interested in continuing with music?
James- “I would encourage AYPO musicians to keep on with their musical education after high
school. Even if you donʹt go on to major in music, there are still so many opportunities to study
and play. Take music classes and get involved in ensembles. College is such a great opportunity
to find other musicians and learn, and it gets harder to do when youʹre out of school, so definitely
take advantage while you can. The other piece of advice I would give is to always stay open to new and different opportunities, stay in touch with all your old friends, and always keep the attitude that anything is possible with music, because you never know what might happen. So many great things can happen if you stay involved.”
source- http: //www.aypo.org/pdf/news/Issue-44.5.pdf
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on November 29, 2010, 04:59:00 AM
Another interview from Maribor



Hey Voodoo - Can I ask where you found this splendid article?? Thanks for sharing by the way!!


Yes I am also wondering about this.  I understand that the short review from Maribor towards the bottom comes from this article [url]http://www.zurnal24.si/fotogalerije/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-193087/clanek[/url] ([url]http://www.zurnal24.si/fotogalerije/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-193087/clanek[/url]) but where does the first part of this come from?  Thank you and looking forward to hearing about the show!  


The first part comes from the same site: http://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/v-slovenijo-prinesla-sonce-193025/clanek
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 29, 2010, 05:00:04 AM
Another interview from Maribor



Hey Voodoo - Can I ask where you found this splendid article?? Thanks for sharing by the way!!


Yes I am also wondering about this.  I understand that the short review from Maribor towards the bottom comes from this article [url]http://www.zurnal24.si/fotogalerije/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-193087/clanek[/url] ([url]http://www.zurnal24.si/fotogalerije/maribor-zural-z-razlogom-193087/clanek[/url]) but where does the first part of this come from?  Thank you and looking forward to hearing about the show!  


The first part comes from the same site: [url]http://www.zurnal24.si/glasba/v-slovenijo-prinesla-sonce-193025/clanek[/url]


Thank you ! ! ! It's appreciated  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on November 29, 2010, 04:05:45 PM
([url]http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lcn0p5gs1l1qbahouo1_500.jpg[/url])

Interview With James Richardson by the American Youth Philharmonic Orchestra
of which he was a member of from 1997-2001


Interviewer- How old were you when you began music, and what instrument did you play?
James- “I was always messing around on the piano for as long as I can remember. I started piano lessons when I was five or six; that was my first ʹseriousʹ instrument.”
Interviewer- What is your favorite memory from your days with AYPO?
James- “My favorite memories with AYP might be from the
year we attended the National Youth Orchestra Festival in Sarasota, Florida. We got to meet
friends from other youth orchestras, mix up and play in different ensembles with each
other. We were very proud to represent AYP and there were some great conductors there.”
Interviewer- What has been your most memorable moment with MGMT to date?
James- “My most memorable
moment with MGMT was probably opening for Radiohead in Manchester. Coming onstage in
front of a sold out arena crowd and seeing your heroes on the side, ready to watch you perform,
was pretty indescribable. We got a glimpse of what it is like to be on that level, where youʹre
playing to fifty thousand people every night.”
Interviewer- What is your role in MGMT? Give us a glimpse into the personality of the band and its
members.
James- “My role in MGMT is guitar player. Andrew and Ben are the two founding members
of the band and they made the first album before the other three of us (guitar, bass, drums) joined the band. Weʹre all going to contribute and cooperate on the new record, though. Iʹd say that weʹre all pretty easy going, fun loving people, and we donʹt take things too seriously. We are all kind of geeky and appreciate the same things.”
Interviewer- What inspires you as a musician?
James- “I find inspiration to play music everywhere around me. For me, music is connected to everything in life; itʹs part of my world view. Music is my main means of expression, and my main purpose in life, so I canʹt go without it.”
Interviewer- How has your classical training helped you with your current career path? In what
ways?
James-“My classical training helps me today in so many ways. It would be impossible to
think of playing music without it. For one thing, it makes communicating about music so
much easier. The other guys in the band are trained musicians so I can say stuff to them
like, ʺCould you clean up that dotted rhythmʺ, or ʺI think we should bring out the seventh
hereʺ, instead of being vague. But much more than that, studying classical music has enriched
my understanding of all music; knowing the history of how harmony developed gives
every chord new meaning, and thereʹs a lot of counterpoint going on in our music too. For me,
learning about all different kinds of music and comparing them with each other helps me understand and appreciate both kinds more than I ever could if I had stuck to just one.”
Interviewer- What advice would you give to AYPO musicians interested in continuing with music?
James- “I would encourage AYPO musicians to keep on with their musical education after high
school. Even if you donʹt go on to major in music, there are still so many opportunities to study
and play. Take music classes and get involved in ensembles. College is such a great opportunity
to find other musicians and learn, and it gets harder to do when youʹre out of school, so definitely
take advantage while you can. The other piece of advice I would give is to always stay open to new and different opportunities, stay in touch with all your old friends, and always keep the attitude that anything is possible with music, because you never know what might happen. So many great things can happen if you stay involved.”
source- http: //www.aypo.org/pdf/news/Issue-44.5.pdf


Why does this make me so happy?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 29, 2010, 04:07:29 PM
([url]http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lcn0p5gs1l1qbahouo1_500.jpg[/url])

Interview With James Richardson by the American Youth Philharmonic Orchestra
of which he was a member of from 1997-2001


Interviewer- How old were you when you began music, and what instrument did you play?
James- “I was always messing around on the piano for as long as I can remember. I started piano lessons when I was five or six; that was my first ʹseriousʹ instrument.”
Interviewer- What is your favorite memory from your days with AYPO?
James- “My favorite memories with AYP might be from the
year we attended the National Youth Orchestra Festival in Sarasota, Florida. We got to meet
friends from other youth orchestras, mix up and play in different ensembles with each
other. We were very proud to represent AYP and there were some great conductors there.”
Interviewer- What has been your most memorable moment with MGMT to date?
James- “My most memorable
moment with MGMT was probably opening for Radiohead in Manchester. Coming onstage in
front of a sold out arena crowd and seeing your heroes on the side, ready to watch you perform,
was pretty indescribable. We got a glimpse of what it is like to be on that level, where youʹre
playing to fifty thousand people every night.”
Interviewer- What is your role in MGMT? Give us a glimpse into the personality of the band and its
members.
James- “My role in MGMT is guitar player. Andrew and Ben are the two founding members
of the band and they made the first album before the other three of us (guitar, bass, drums) joined the band. Weʹre all going to contribute and cooperate on the new record, though. Iʹd say that weʹre all pretty easy going, fun loving people, and we donʹt take things too seriously. We are all kind of geeky and appreciate the same things.”
Interviewer- What inspires you as a musician?
James- “I find inspiration to play music everywhere around me. For me, music is connected to everything in life; itʹs part of my world view. Music is my main means of expression, and my main purpose in life, so I canʹt go without it.”
Interviewer- How has your classical training helped you with your current career path? In what
ways?
James-“My classical training helps me today in so many ways. It would be impossible to
think of playing music without it. For one thing, it makes communicating about music so
much easier. The other guys in the band are trained musicians so I can say stuff to them
like, ʺCould you clean up that dotted rhythmʺ, or ʺI think we should bring out the seventh
hereʺ, instead of being vague. But much more than that, studying classical music has enriched
my understanding of all music; knowing the history of how harmony developed gives
every chord new meaning, and thereʹs a lot of counterpoint going on in our music too. For me,
learning about all different kinds of music and comparing them with each other helps me understand and appreciate both kinds more than I ever could if I had stuck to just one.”
Interviewer- What advice would you give to AYPO musicians interested in continuing with music?
James- “I would encourage AYPO musicians to keep on with their musical education after high
school. Even if you donʹt go on to major in music, there are still so many opportunities to study
and play. Take music classes and get involved in ensembles. College is such a great opportunity
to find other musicians and learn, and it gets harder to do when youʹre out of school, so definitely
take advantage while you can. The other piece of advice I would give is to always stay open to new and different opportunities, stay in touch with all your old friends, and always keep the attitude that anything is possible with music, because you never know what might happen. So many great things can happen if you stay involved.”
source- http: //www.aypo.org/pdf/news/Issue-44.5.pdf


Why does this make me so happy?


Because you have good taste and he fucking oozes WIN
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on November 29, 2010, 04:18:17 PM
Why does this make me so happy?
[/quote]

Because you have good taste and he fucking oozes WIN
[/quote]

Fuck yeah!  8) This band amazes me more and more every day....
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 29, 2010, 07:18:33 PM
INTERVIEWER: Are there differences between audiences in different countries?

ANDREW: I don’t think we have enough mileage to judge. We’ve never performed in Norway, for example.



Ummmm....?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 29, 2010, 07:52:09 PM
INTERVIEWER: Are there differences between audiences in different countries?

ANDREW: I don’t think we have enough mileage to judge. We’ve never performed in Norway, for example.



Ummmm....?

Yeah you have Andrew!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTPo-hiDR9M
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Chumbum2.0 on November 29, 2010, 07:56:05 PM
INTERVIEWER: Are there differences between audiences in different countries?

ANDREW: I don’t think we have enough mileage to judge. We’ve never performed in Norway, for example.



Ummmm....?

Yeah you have Andrew!
[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTPo-hiDR9M[/url]

The effects of Marijuana are...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 29, 2010, 07:58:24 PM
INTERVIEWER: Are there differences between audiences in different countries?

ANDREW: I don’t think we have enough mileage to judge. We’ve never performed in Norway, for example.



Ummmm....?

Yeah you have Andrew!
[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTPo-hiDR9M[/url]

The effects of Marijuana are...


nonexistent?  :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 29, 2010, 08:08:45 PM
INTERVIEWER: Are there differences between audiences in different countries?

ANDREW: I don’t think we have enough mileage to judge. We’ve never performed in Norway, for example.



Ummmm....?

Yeah you have Andrew!
[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTPo-hiDR9M[/url]

The effects of Marijuana are...


nonexistent?  :D

Haha, apparently these effects include forgetting you played at Hovefestivalen in Norway.  I still like him though, I will give him a break on this one  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lovelier on November 29, 2010, 08:19:22 PM
INTERVIEWER: Are there differences between audiences in different countries?

ANDREW: I don’t think we have enough mileage to judge. We’ve never performed in Norway, for example.



Ummmm....?

Yeah you have Andrew!
[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTPo-hiDR9M[/url]

The effects of Marijuana are...


nonexistent?  :D

Haha, apparently these effects include forgetting you played at Hovefestivalen in Norway.  I still like him though, I will give him a break on this one  :-*


Hahahah! Umm... he said they dressed as manatees?!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Jenneh on November 30, 2010, 04:45:28 AM
I heard MGMT have a double page in Q magazine this month about their inspirations
anyone have a scan?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on November 30, 2010, 10:11:37 AM
Another interview from Maribor

Bringing sunshine to Slovenia (dunno about that it was foggy and FUCKING cold!)

Yesterday, you finally have arrived in Slovenia or in Maribor. What are your first impressions?
Andrew: As we arrived at night, we did not see much. The center of Maribor looks very cool, especially since it snowed yesterday. And as we heard the oldest vine in the world grows here. We saw the river too ...

Have you tried Slovenian wine?
Andrew: Yeah, well Ben did (laughs). They offered us a special spirit drink that looked very dark...

Made from blueberries? Blueberry?
Andrew: Yeah, that was it, I guess.
Ben: We drank a local red wine.

How much?
Ben: It was very strange, because I drank and drank, but because I was so tired from the trip and the time difference, it did not even have an effect on me.

How have you guys managed to come right today - the day of the concert, which is open air - and didn`t have trouble with snow? It snowed yesterday and it`s once again predicted for tomorrow ...
Andrew: I do not know, given the fact that wherever we play we bring the rain and apparently this rule does not apply to Slovenia, as we brought the sun. Today is a very nice day, huh?

Have you heard any other group, which now play?
Andrew: We heard Italian funk band that played before us ... What`s their name? (One of the organizers help, Op. P.) Did! Very nice guys who have similar influences as we - a lot of teams from the New York scene 80th years.

This is the first concert of your European tour. Where will you still go?
Ben: The next stop is Germany, then Scandinavia. Followed by Spain, Portugal, Austria, France, Italy, ... I`t gonna be fun.

Do you have preferred European location to play?
Ben: Berlin is one of my favorite concert sites. We haven`t played for a long time there.

Are there differences between audiences in different countries?
Andrew: I don`t thikn we have enough mileage to judge. We've never performed in Norway, for example ... The German audiences are usually really good.

Sorry, but (pointing at a black-and-white striped wallpaper Poster Party with a Cause, op. P), were you involved in the desinging of this poster, it looks like something you guys would make (laughter)? I`ve been looking at this background for too long, but because you`re sitting right here ...
Ben: How do they call this?
Andrew: Razzle-Dazzle!
Ben: Really?

Razzle-Dazzle?
Andrew: Yeah, that was used on ships ... and if you don`t look close enough, you wouldn`t even know it`s there.

Will you play more stuff from the new album, Congratulations or from the previous Oracular Spectacular at the concert?
Andrew: Half-half.

Even some covers, special songs?
Andrew: Also ... Each song is special.

When do you make the final set list? Quickly before the concert, or much earlier?
Andrew: An hour before the concert or something like that.

And what is the decisive factor?
Andrew: I ask the band what they would like to play again, then write a list ... And when Ben suggests anything I change it (both burst out laughing, op. P).

What songs receive best response?
Andrew: Electric Feel, Time To Pretend ... Those who are the most popular and most people like.

What are you guys like best?
Andrew: I like playing long and slow songs, like Siberian Breaks. And you, Ben?
Ben: Time To Pretend.
Andrew: Oh, you sold your soul (laughs)!

Since the festival's charitable note there is no official after-partyja and since you`re leaving tomorrow - will you go out and test out Maribor`s nightlife?
Andrew: Actually we aren`t the types that go into clubs ... We rather go to a bar with good music. Or in those clubs which allow us to loudly listen to our iPods. We look for bars that let us be the DJs (laughs).

Maybe you could share the most crazy tour story of this last tour?
Andrew: OK, we dressed in Scooby Doo costumes, but that`s pretty normal ... (Long pause, op. P) ... Yeah, in Florida we wore manatees (sea cow) costumes, they are similar to walruses.

Are they similar to sea lions?
Andrew: Yeah ...

And you walked around dressed as that because ... ?
Andrew: It was Halloween and we went trick-or-treating.

Andrew looks at Žurnal`s microphone sponge, which they both admired before the interview and called it funky.

Would you like to keep the funky sponge?
Andrew: Could we really? Thank you. Wow - I`ll use it every day!

It has many uses ...
Andrew: Yeah! Bath sponge, condom (laughter) ...


I`ll write about the concert tomorrow, k? If anyone is still interested...


Short review from Maribor:

Despite the injury professionally executed concert

Although it was snowing the day before, as well as a day later, MGMT brought the sun to Slovenia - in an interview with Žurnal24 the frontman Andrew VanWyngarden said that they usually bring rain to their concert venues. The vocalist was in a good mood, and there was no way of telling that there was anything wrong with his arm (he recently dislocated his shoulder), although he wore a splint after the concert. The crowd was the most responsive to the most recognizable hits such as Electric Feel, Time To Pretend and Kids. Transportation and cold probably helped that the main square was attended by fewer people than expected, although there were still a few thousand.

Among the groups that came before MGMT, were the more enthusiastic Austrian Bunny Lake, but otherwise the stage hosted the local We Can not Sleep At Night, Italian DID (they were fucking horrible OMG!!), Rotor and Code.EP.

Partying with MGMT in Cinema Udarnik
Around a hundred lucky that attended the after party visited cinema Udarnik, and had a chance to see the whole band MGMT in a more relaxed atmosphere - Andrew and Ben even took over the mixing desk and tried to DJ. There was no shortage of enthusiastic teenage fangirls, following the very down-to-earth Andrew at every stage, and taking photographs with him.

The discovery of America in Maribor
MGMT may remember Slovenia after the end of the event in Udarnik, when they, at 4 am could hardly find an open restaurant with fast food (you know like a kebab shop).They were forced to opt for - believe it or not -  McDonald's.



God, why did I have to go to Munich at 6 am to see another band play there!!!!!! :'(
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Cecilie on November 30, 2010, 03:11:17 PM
Quote
Are there differences between audiences in different countries?
Andrew: I don`t thikn we have enough mileage to judge. We've never performed in Norway, for example ...
man, that's embarrassing
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on December 01, 2010, 02:39:39 PM
that interview with James is probably one of my favorite things I have ever read.
especially this bit, “I find inspiration to play music everywhere around me. For me, music is connected to everything in life; itʹs part of my world view. Music is my main means of expression, and my main purpose in life, so I canʹt go without it.”
thank you for that!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on December 01, 2010, 03:45:51 PM
that interview with James is probably one of my favorite things I have ever read.
especially this bit, “I find inspiration to play music everywhere around me. For me, music is connected to everything in life; itʹs part of my world view. Music is my main means of expression, and my main purpose in life, so I canʹt go without it.”
thank you for that!
this is such an inspirational quote. It was something that really stuck out to me too when I read it :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on December 08, 2010, 04:24:45 PM
I heard MGMT have a double page in Q magazine this month about their inspirations
anyone have a scan?


Here it is
(http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/8049/scan0002uaq.jpg) (http://img522.imageshack.us/i/scan0002uaq.jpg/)

(http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/5286/scan0001uq.jpg) (http://img404.imageshack.us/i/scan0001uq.jpg/)

Aliens-smokin-weed vibe :) such an Andrew thing to say
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on December 08, 2010, 04:29:57 PM
Sorry, they're huge ???. will embed next time
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on December 08, 2010, 04:30:44 PM
I heard MGMT have a double page in Q magazine this month about their inspirations
anyone have a scan?
Here it is
Aliens-smokin-weed vibe :) such an Andrew thing to say

Thanks for sharing! :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on December 08, 2010, 04:52:43 PM
Sorry, they're huge ???. will embed next time
Don't apologize, it's great! :)

These are my most favorite kind of articles to read about them. My music collection has expended exponentially because of these dudes here!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on December 08, 2010, 06:22:49 PM
Sorry, they're huge ???. will embed next time
Don't apologize, it's great! :)

These are my most favorite kind of articles to read about them. My music collection has expended exponentially because of these dudes here!
:)
Ikr? There's so much good music out there! My brother who's six years senior and a great fan of 'weird' music's in awe of his little sister ;)

Oh and BTW, I have the exact same pair of H by Hudson shoes he's wearing in the pic...in size 36/6 US...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 08, 2010, 06:25:29 PM
Sorry, they're huge ???. will embed next time
Don't apologize, it's great! :)

These are my most favorite kind of articles to read about them. My music collection has expended exponentially because of these dudes here!
:)
Ikr? There's so much good music out there! My brother who's six years senior and a great fan of 'weird' music's in awe of his little sister ;)

Yesterday my son thanked me for introducing him to Alt music-he said he didn't know or want to know what his life would be like without it.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on December 08, 2010, 06:28:33 PM
Sorry, they're huge ???. will embed next time
Don't apologize, it's great! :)

These are my most favorite kind of articles to read about them. My music collection has expended exponentially because of these dudes here!
:)
Ikr? There's so much good music out there! My brother who's six years senior and a great fan of 'weird' music's in awe of his little sister ;)

Yesterday my son thanked me for introducing him to Alt music-he said he didn't know or want to know what his life would be like without it.

Yeah! spread the word!
And Falala...love your yuletide add-on
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: olympian 13601 on December 09, 2010, 06:52:54 AM
Flip- loads of "new" old music to check out there; the only Album they mention that I have got is Unicorn/Tyrannosaurus Rex and I find the early T-Rex stuff to be quite far-out compared to the more accessible albums like Tanx, Zinc Alloy and the Hidden Riders of Tommorrow and Slider.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 13, 2010, 08:45:32 PM
new radio interview
http://www.cheeseontoast.co.nz/index2.html? (http://www.cheeseontoast.co.nz/index2.html?)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 13, 2010, 09:39:22 PM
Print interview with Ben
http://www.lifelounge.com/music/interview/interview-with-mgmt.aspx
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lovelier on December 14, 2010, 12:57:05 AM
I love how in both interviews they're basically saying that the media panned "Congratulations" but they never mention their SOLD OUT shows and headlining festival slots. Great fans  ;) . Thanks for posting guys!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on December 14, 2010, 03:20:49 AM
new radio interview
[url]http://www.cheeseontoast.co.nz/index2.html?[/url] ([url]http://www.cheeseontoast.co.nz/index2.html?[/url])


I loved that little interview, and mentioning sold out shows and substantial fan base and it's all due to their authenticity and honesty.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 14, 2010, 03:22:40 AM
new radio interview
[url]http://www.cheeseontoast.co.nz/index2.html?[/url] ([url]http://www.cheeseontoast.co.nz/index2.html?[/url])


I loved that little interview, and mentioning sold out shows and substantial fan base and it's all due to their authenticity and honesty.


Exactly.  Plus I really felt like Andrew got across that he feels the strong presence of their fans and that he appreciates it all. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on December 18, 2010, 05:36:52 AM
American Songwriter: MGMT:It's Working http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/ (http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 18, 2010, 05:44:38 AM
American Songwriter: MGMT:It's Working [url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url] ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url])


Mark Richardson....
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 18, 2010, 05:54:03 AM
American Songwriter: MGMT:It's Working [url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url] ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url])


Mark Richardson....


I have no tolerance for that whatsoever.  It's your job to write this, the least you could do is not fuck up something as big as someone's name. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 18, 2010, 05:57:02 AM
American Songwriter: MGMT:It's Working [url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url] ([url]http://www.americansongwriter.com/2010/12/mgmt-its-working/[/url])


Mark Richardson....


I have no tolerance for that whatsoever.  It's your job to write this, the least you could do is not fuck up something as big as someone's name. 


When all of the Congratulations reviews and interviews were being done, I really wanted to keep a running list of all of the journalistic fails.  I have no patience for it either.  GTFO

Thanks for the post winnie!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: loody on December 18, 2010, 06:24:39 AM
journalists are the scum of the earth [99% of the time]
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on December 18, 2010, 03:26:05 PM
I haven't checked here lately, had to catch up  :D
the interview with Ben is fantastic
"We put out any album that didn't have any obvious hits on it and took a few listens to get into - but a lot of people put out music like that"
really!? I know I keep saying this but it's so damn shocking to me when I hear that people do that... I got hooked the second I heard it.
Anyway, that's just my own personal thing...
I loooooove how positive he/they are about a lot of things (like not minding the negatives and being so humble. I don't think it sounds 'douchy' at all). The attitude that they give off is the best! n_n

Anyway, I also hate critic stuff, I never bother to read those aha
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: DEAD_FLOWER on December 21, 2010, 01:45:06 AM
 :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on December 30, 2010, 10:23:08 PM
sooo anyone got the new NME and willing to share....

http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=8&p=9575&title=100_greatest_lost_albums_this_week_s_nme&more=1&c=1 (http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=8&p=9575&title=100_greatest_lost_albums_this_week_s_nme&more=1&c=1)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: jcj on December 30, 2010, 11:24:12 PM
sooo anyone got the new NME and willing to share....

[url]http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=8&p=9575&title=100_greatest_lost_albums_this_week_s_nme&more=1&c=1[/url] ([url]http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=8&p=9575&title=100_greatest_lost_albums_this_week_s_nme&more=1&c=1[/url])


Myself and Fairy Tale Of Hurt made this thread for this exact reason. Hope this helps!   :)

http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=8385.0 (http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=8385.0)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on December 31, 2010, 03:12:02 AM
sooo anyone got the new NME and willing to share....

[url]http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=8&p=9575&title=100_greatest_lost_albums_this_week_s_nme&more=1&c=1[/url] ([url]http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=8&p=9575&title=100_greatest_lost_albums_this_week_s_nme&more=1&c=1[/url])


Myself and Fairy Tale Of Hurt made this thread for this exact reason. Hope this helps!   :)

[url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=8385.0[/url] ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=8385.0[/url])


Here's a bigger version:
(http://img833.imageshack.us/img833/2169/nmez.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 31, 2010, 06:07:40 AM
Thanks Allison  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Suprachiasmatic on December 31, 2010, 01:26:13 PM
Thanks Allison  :-*

:-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on January 01, 2011, 09:38:53 PM
that's a great article, thanks.  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: puredaze on January 03, 2011, 09:40:30 PM
wow, this list is incredible. MGMT library right there.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on January 05, 2011, 02:46:29 PM
This is from January issue of Mojo, Congratulations ended up being the third best album of 2010 (#1 John Grant and #2 Arcade fire - they both got two page spread). Then Brian Eno picks his fave tracks of the year, as does Ben, the MGMT lion  :)

(http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/4797/scan0001qo.jpg) (http://img291.imageshack.us/i/scan0001qo.jpg/)

(http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/3670/scan0004t.jpg) (http://img156.imageshack.us/i/scan0004t.jpg/)

(http://img709.imageshack.us/img709/838/scan0002mg.jpg) (http://img709.imageshack.us/i/scan0002mg.jpg/)

(http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/4138/scan0003y.jpg) (http://img690.imageshack.us/i/scan0003y.jpg/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on January 05, 2011, 03:01:17 PM
Thanks Ninko!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ninko on January 05, 2011, 03:04:18 PM
Thanks Ninko!

With pleasure Lala!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Sizzle on January 05, 2011, 08:45:29 PM
MGMT lion, I like it.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mouret on January 05, 2011, 08:56:40 PM
Ben's been bumped up from a kitten to a lion.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: NowLetsHaveSomeFun on January 13, 2011, 06:16:54 AM
Cheers for the uploads guys!!

I took a listen to Da Capo and it has a sound very similar to the music the band were using as "intro" music during the recent tour i.e. lots of flutes, very 60's psyche etc. Anyone fancy listening to the entire Love back catalogue to see if we can find the exact song they have been using??!!  :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: winnie on January 17, 2011, 07:49:25 AM
Hi! I found an article in argentinian newspapers ( sorry for the poor goolge translations)
with Andrew ->  
http://www.lanacion.com.ar/nota.asp?nota_id=1342061 (http://www.lanacion.com.ar/nota.asp?nota_id=1342061)
"- What is your first musical memory?
Andrew:  "I remember when I was very, very young my mom and my dad put the album True Stories, Talking Heads, which was the soundtrack of the film. It is a very early memories of my childhood, but I remember going down the basement stairs and listen to those guitars. Probably was in shock forever. "
"I don't have very clear idea what" selling out " means, but for me personally the art is about doing things involving every part of you, both body and mind. Not everything is money and ambition. When I wrote that line I was thinking of the slaves that still exist in several countries. There was something that I would rather die than be a slave ... "He says, laughing. And, of course, refers to The Who [N. R., who immortalized the phrase "I hope to die before I get old" for a generation of rockers]. "
"We probably have more Grateful Dead to us than any band of our generation. We Don't want to be remembered for that, but our music definitely has more to do with Jerry Garcia rock than with electronics."

http://www.si.clarin.com/paranoicos_0_408559151.html (http://www.si.clarin.com/paranoicos_0_408559151.html)

with Ben->
http://www.pagina12.com.ar/diario/suplementos/no/12-5199-2011-01-13.html (http://www.pagina12.com.ar/diario/suplementos/no/12-5199-2011-01-13.html)
Perhaps the great achievement of MGMT is also the great weight comprises the shoulders of Andrew van Wyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, the duo in question, having published two of the best albums of the last five years, Oracular Spectacular (2008) and Congratulations (2010 ), and lacking even a couple of years to turn 30. All distress (post) teen musical dreams and frustrations of this pair of twentysomethings who met at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, these albums became a childish game and masturbatory with pop song structures, but also the audio document of the scientific search for two boys well, universities, and educated Drogon in music, in its desperate attempt to move anything. In addition, a pair of artists who are part of a generation with something traumatic adolescence fall of the Twin Towers, who in his youth saw the world of television and show their position on the Iraq invasion and, as such adults, they saw the financial crisis in his native United States from the window of an airplane, on a tour. A generation for whom social networks were an advance and not a communication standard, still consumed pornography in magazines and buy records. "A generation tepid", cut Ben Goldwasser, the originating phone for this interview that the next Saturday 22 at 18 played in the hostel Mute Club de Mar del Plata, free.
- Why did you say?

"Because it's a biopolar generation. On one side it's very fun because there are many things happening, much thing to pay attention to. But on the other there are too many distractions for this generation as well. I think it is warm because it is very bright in some things, art, entertainment and technology, but should wake up in other, more humane and more complex.
- You refer to the policy?

"Yes. I believe that the youths are revolutionary and I think our generation went through all these facts that you mentioned, and would have realized who and who should be trying to generate a new revolution, but nevertheless  everything happens on the Internet, social networks and technology. Many young people are falling into a hole. A hole fun perhaps, but a hole nonetheless.

Goldwasser's tone is sometimes disappointing in distress. It is clear, or at least it is through the a priori bias, which is half over and less extroverted nerd MGMT, but not that Van Wyngarden is off too the first mote, or be a stand up comic. Just Ben is the quiet one, as in many duos of friends. The difference from any other is that they, with their musical creation MGMT, are at the top (or near) modern music in 2011, carrying nearly two years as top journals that are respected by the greatest musicians, released two albums that beastly (especially the most successful Congratulations), who have fame, fortune and some pretty facade. But after that are the same pair of kids half freaks who have a band, go to time and screw off the pibas babble. "Yes, it's dream come true and all you want, but it is very bloody for us. Our lives changed a lot as we looked at, and became quite crazy, I hardly spend time at home ... And that is not good! The truth is that it is difficult bancarte be at this level because like it or not,  many people get information about what we do and plenty of those people pay attention to us. "
-In empathy one can understand the disorder, but on the other hand you say, "Hey, Ben, no kidding, thousands of kids would want to be where you are ."

"Like I said, to get them information and have more or less an idea of how we live. But there are things they do not arrive and, really, are not good. Then, of course, is the joy of doing this and living this way, now that's a dream come true. Just what we modestly, because this can end. We do not hype, that's why the rest. We're here to make songs, and play.

Andy and Ben are crossed for the first time on campus, in the first week of the first year of courses at Wesleyan University, a house of arts and humanities studies of less than 3 000 students in Connecticut. Both chose their place in the wildest areas of the residence halls, including Drogon, avant-garde artists and impostors seekers girls field with which enfiestarse. By late 2001, after sneaking fungi and overnight flash in the field of college sports were already writing together, but even there their paths were quite different. Van Wyngarden, MGMT voice and guitar, was born almost two months too soon, the son of a couple of hippies turned-owners of a small alternative newspaper in Memphis, still sensitive to a disc of Bob Dylan or Neil Young. Grew up with problems: the Messi, had to take growth hormones and by the time I was out of the trauma, his parents divorced. But he left the legacy of American roots music, the English psychedelic pop and San Francisco, and some militant naturists. Ben's childhood was somewhat simpler (ie, Paul would become the duo) was raised in a small town in upstate New York between animals, because his father was a veterinarian and his family raised goats, except his grandmother, piano instructor, who came to the instrument appropriately handled today, as well as programmed orchestrations and voices, MGMT.

"I think one of the major changes between then and now, you have to do with the music market is now easier bancarte a solo career, but also more difficult to do something transcendental. 20 or 30 years ago, the chances of making a demo and concert venues were few. There are many opportunities now and be done at any time, I think that is the fate of our generation, "says Ben, who always seems to mean more than they in fact expressed, but also at all times seems to run out of gas. Andrew and the bank by themselves the publication of two EPs, We (do not) Care under the name The Management (Management), and Time to Pretend, and as MGMT. The latter contained the single Time To Pretend, Kids who along with the plunger removed that politically correct university of art and cast them into a spiral that included delusional labels, air travel to play in remote areas, production of photos, clothing designer, women, chupaculos, drugs, more drugs and thousands of other psychedelic drugs.
- How are the idea of belonging to the mainstream, being that emerged from a very strong indie scene in Brooklyn (along with peers such as Yeasayer, Dirty Projectors and Vampire Weekend plus bat afro-beat)?

"I think I'm in a very weird about what happened with the band. The idea of the mainstream and should be changed to see again what the mainstream, redefining it. The only thing I now looks identical to the time of the bands that we like is that you have to go out and show people things. Internet provides access, but do not ensure anything, you have to go looking for them, if you're interested. Or you can spend like us, who suddenly began talking about the band and do not know how.
"Anyway, are not easy to find a band, a single band.

"But now the mainstream is basically an extension of pop culture. And pop culture is self-generating and is self-regulated, influenced by what the corporations tell people, sure, but not quite. I think it is very interesting for us to be there because it was not belong to a large corporation we arrived. Companies sometimes go before that happens and generate fashions and trends, but sometimes they are far behind what is happening in the street. They try to change the fashions, but it takes long time to change cultures.

"We are not even remotely interested in the concept of entertainment," he said at some point. And while the arty pose sell as much as the more classical music, the intricate composition that attempted game discs can be glimpsed in a broader search, with the fairly impossible to track from their second album, which appeared in early 2010. That Oracular Spectacular 2008 was a gallery of songs that transcended three cuts, in fact, dating from his first zapadas: Time to Pretend, Kids, Electric Feel, more appropriate to the dance floor that are mentally Mambo two musicians who prefer to stay in a living playing music to go to a concert. His early electro-punks / dance-rock drenched those hits had stopped, but his debut was clear, in pieces like 4th Dimensional Transition and Future Reflections, the thing went further: psychedelic pop, synth pop, expansive harmonies, address changes characteristic of progressive music (but thinned) and a mixture of sarcasm, reality and fantasy in Congratulations peaked in Lady Dada's Nightmare, Congratulations and Flash Delirium, not counting the intractable Siberian Breaks: more than twelve minutes of variations raved.

"We are emerging ideas for the third. The past was a great year for the band will be touring in 2011 to show our second album. We are very pleased and surprised by the reception he got. The first album came out great and we strive to deliver something good to maintain the necessary support to take Congratulations. But it was difficult because we did not know how he was going to take people, that we still had good drafts. But at one point, artistic or strategically, with Oracular Spectacular did what we wanted and what we Congratulations a level beyond "reflects Goldwasser. "Maybe we finish the third year for this purpose. What we have now really makes us proud and relieved. We are pleased to have achieved that MGMT is a respectable band. "
"Oracular Spectacular was a huge album, but overall the idea of the album was lost behind the hits. His second album that did not happen and you could see the whole picture of the group.

"Not the whole picture, I think a more synthetic, more compact. We do not feel we had to prove anything with this album. Because the idea was to make an album, not a collection of hits. First, because we are not interested at this time and then because we believe in the idea of album work with times and climates, where not everything has to be a hit. It is difficult, I think even more difficult because it requires much time and did not have much when we did. A year after that, I see it was worth.

In the credits of the second disc, which appears not only that parody girlish Lady Dada's Nightmare (a song that sounds like a soundtrack for a cremation and was inspired by Lady Gaga) but also homages to Brian Eno ("In Search of I went soul sounds to a cathedral. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that had been produced by Brian Eno, "sing the theme that is named after the former Roxy Music) and Dan Treacy (Television Personalities), one should also mention the musician Peter Kember, much better known as Peter Kember of Spacemen 3 and Spectrum and Sonic become capacitadísimo producer. Live, the duo originally formed by Andy and Ben just joined the musicians Matt Asti (bass player and singer), Will Berman (drummer and singer) and James Richardson (guitarist and vocalist), all study participants also bill Congratulations . Mute them will play in Club de Mar next week and try to replicate his songs faithfully.
"With the amount of overdubs, arrangements and variations that her new album, how do they play it live? "With tracks? Or cut?

"Do not play with leads, or we get nothing, we want to give something worthwhile, because dignity is one of the values that we propose to MGMT. It is increasingly easy because Congratulations and was recorded throughout the band, has a most successful attempt to approach the possibilities of live performance. And it is curious that there are some songs work better live than on disc, are expanded. The process was searched as well, because we want to make a replica of a show scheduled every night. Playing with tracks would be terrible, would not leave us room to change anything on the fly. It would be suffocating and supposed to be doing music not to suffocate.

http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/26972/MGMT (http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/26972/MGMT)  "With no New Year’s resolutions to hold him back, and the craziest thing he has done lately being “resting and cooking lots of food”, Goldwasser is conserving all his energy for their nearing trip to Australia in March."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Coralie on January 19, 2011, 02:09:46 PM
An "avant goût" from New Zealand:

http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/blogs/shahlin/2666-dear-andrew-vanwyngarden-you-have-won-me-over



"Andrew kind of issued a date-invitation to New Zealand: "come to the shows so that we can all get coffee and go record shopping..." and yes, he talked about what dinosaur he would be if he were a dino"
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Oonagh on January 19, 2011, 10:40:18 PM
Inthemix has published a new interview with MGMT 2 days ago, i don't know if it was mentiond yet
MGMT: Not an electro band: http://www.inthemix.com.au/features/48955/MGMT_Not_an_electro_band (http://www.inthemix.com.au/features/48955/MGMT_Not_an_electro_band)

in there Andrew says about stumbling upon fame: "I think I just kind of fell into music. Many musicians talk of having a particular moment when they realised that they wanted to pursue music as a profession, but I couldn’t think of anything else to do. I applied for so many part time jobs on Craig’s List, and that went nowhere… I thought MGMT was a goner and going nowhere when I first moved to Brooklyn, and I was sitting with Kevin Barnes [from Of Montreal], and one time we were song writing and I guess that sort of narrowed it down."

^ this is comforting, I might get famous too by 25. but there's little time left. fuck .)

I love love inthemix.com.au. They have some really good articles (not news and gossip)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on February 28, 2011, 03:45:24 PM
Interview with Coup de Main Magazine...

MGMT's ANDREW VANWYNGARDEN issues a vinyl shopping and coffee date invitation... 
Written by Sarah Mudgway     
Monday, 28 February 2011 16:10 

Last time MGMT visited our shores in 2009, they were riding high on the waves of success that their debut ‘Oracular Spectacular’ produced - an album that, as ANDREW VANWYNGARDEN hints, was never intended to become as huge as it was - "we never really considered ourselves as a serious band and we weren’t ever trying to get signed or become some huge thing." However, the success and mainstream attention gained from singles such as ‘Kids’ and ‘Time To Pretend’ allowed the band to play sold out dates across the globe, including three headlining shows at Auckland’s Powerstation - which you can read our review of HERE.

Since then, MGMT have evolved from the duo of VanWyngarden and his co-founding friend Benjamin Goldwasser to a fully-fledged quintet and released their second album ‘Congratulations’. While many critics and fans were quick to point out the differences between 'Oracular Spectacular' and 'Congratulations' - most notably in the lack of catchy electro-pop singles in the same vein as ‘Electric Feel’ - VanWyngarden highlights that for their dedicated fans, it really wasn’t as big of a change as many thought. "I think for the people who see 'Congratulations' as a drastic departure from the first album - which we never really thought of it as - if they go back and listen to songs like ‘Metanoia’, it is hard to hear something like that which we recorded as we were doing our first album and say we’re just an electro band."

MGMT will be back in New Zealand mid-March in support of their second album, this time playing both Auckland and Wellington. Coup De Main was lucky enough to speak to singer, lyricist and co-founder Andrew VanWyngarden ahead of the band's upcoming visit, to discuss everything from Facebook, their upcoming third album, and how he really felt about dressing up as a female during their Voodoo Fest performance...

COUP DE MAIN: MGMT are returning to New Zealand in a few weeks, do you have any memories from your previous trip here that stand out above the rest?
MGMT - ANDREW VANWYNGARDEN: It was Winter time when we were there and I remember Auckland felt a lot like a combination of Toronto and Glasgow to me for some reason. We went to Piha Beach and that was really awesome. I climbed up on that big piece of rock that was there and when everybody else was up on the rock I was on the beach running around; I get really hyper when I go to the beach as I love the ocean and I made a giant peace sign, it made a pretty good picture. The shows were fun too, we got to meet Chris Knox’s family and they were really sweet. It was a good time.

CDM: Since it was Winter, I’m assuming you didn’t go surfing. Do you plan on going this time around since it’ll be just coming into Autumn?
ANDREW: Yeah, if the waves are pretty mellow I’ll go. I injured my shoulder a couple of months ago and I haven’t really been surfing since then. I’ll probably surf in Argentina [while touring] and see how it feels. I’m really itching to get back into it, and we’re going to go to Australia before New Zealand so I’ll definitely surf there, probably in Sydney.

CDM: When MGMT last played in New Zealand, one thing that pleasantly surprised us was that your songs took on a much more organic shoegaze-y vibe, especially when compared to your studio recordings. Do you feel like with the success of singles such as ‘Kids’, MGMT got pigeonholed as a 'dance-electro-pop' band when perhaps that isn’t who you exactly were?
ANDREW: Yeah I think that happened to a degree. I think that it was a mild bother - there were enough people coming to our shows that knew we weren’t just an electro-indie-hipster band, or whatever. I think that by now, especially with our second album ['Congratulations'] that people have realized that we are a band who are always going to be changing our style and sound - it’s just part of who we are.

CDM: Speaking of ‘Congratulations’ having a different sound to ‘Oracular Spectacular’ - were you ever concerned that by taking those electro-pop elements out of your music that all the mainstream attention you had gained with your first album would be lost?
ANDREW: We obviously weren’t worried about that too much, as we did it. We really weren’t thinking about that at all when we were making the second album, I think that’s really good. That electronic kind of sound was who we were as a band when we first started, and while we’re not trying to distance ourselves or you know, kind of say that’s not part of who we are... if we were being honest with ourselves, we’re not going to go out there and make electro-pop music. I just think it’d be so transparent that we were trying to capitalize on the success of the first album and that’s just not the goal of the band. The goal of the band is to be able to make music that we want to make and have fans that appreciate that - and that’s what we did. So I personally think it really paid off because we played a whole year of sold-out shows and had a great time and I think a lot of the pressure that we felt from being pigeonholed, it disappeared in 2010 and that’s really great.

CDM: I guess also the success you had with ‘Oracular Spectacular’ would almost allow you to take more risks with your second and go at it for what you want...
ANDREW: Yeah I think so, and even more so because we never really considered ourselves as a serious band. We weren’t ever trying to get signed or become some huge thing so in a way it is kind of like, there is no better way to do it. We had to take this somewhat of a gamble of doing what we want to do artistically, otherwise if you don’t do that in the second album you’re not ever going to be able to do it really.

CDM: A lot of your lyrics such as in ‘Someone’s Missing’, emote really great imagery such as the line of "somewhere there’s an honest soul to mirror teeth where neon lures troll..." - do you have any literary or visual artists who inspire your lyrics?
ANDREW: A lot of lyrics in 'Someone’s Missing' and a little bit in ‘I Found A Whistle’ were influenced by the book ‘The Diary Of A Drug Fiend’ by Aleister Crowley - just little things that I picked up from that. Also I liked reading some Carl Jung books, like ‘The Archetypes Of The Collective Unconscious’ which is like symbols in dreams and stuff which was really cool. And also ‘Be Here Now’ which is kind of like a 60's New Age hippy-something. Usually when I write lyrics I try to read a lot and listen to a lot of other stuff. Some of my favourite lyricists are like Lou Reed, kind of the classics - Bob Dylan and stuff like that.

CDM: In the song ‘Flash Delirium’, you sing the line "stab Your Facebook" - is that directly aimed at the social networking site?
ANDREW: Yeah it is. I think when Ben read that lyric he was like "really you’re going to talk about Facebook on the album?" - but I feel like, why not? It is such a huge part of so many people’s lives... it’s a weird thing to me.
CDM: What are your thoughts towards the whole social networking craze?
ANDREW: I don’t know. I don’t want to sound like an old fogey or elitist or anything, but I think it’s pretty disgusting. I mean, it’s just wasting a lot of people’s time and distracting them from what real life is. It’s just this weird little world which is fuelled by vanity and looking at pictures of yourself. It’s kind of gross to me I guess.

CDM: Moving on to your third album - last year it was announced it would be self-titled... is that still true?
ANDREW: Yeah.
CDM: Have you started working on that yet?
ANDREW: Not really, we’ve just [been] talking about it a little bit. We’re going to start getting together and writing demos pretty soon I think.

CDM: Do you have any future plans to release any special singles like you did with ‘Metanoia’?
ANDREW: That was just a special thing. It’s funny, we recorded the first album and we didn’t have any extra tracks or b-sides or anything. So when the label said that we really needed some for extra content, we went up to a studio and wrote a fourteen-minute prog-song and gave it to the label and were like: "do whatever you want with it..." - which I think is cool.

CDM: On your website you have the option for fans to submit their own art - what was the idea behind that?
ANDREW: When we are touring on the road we receive a lot of fan artwork and really cool stuff. People make us clothing and we really appreciate all that stuff. So the idea was just to get people to submit art and so our website was always changing. But I think we still have the description on the website like ‘hey our album leaked’ and [the album’s] been out now for a year almost, so I think that we weren’t as on top of that as we could have been. It’s still a cool idea though!

CDM: I did notice that the ‘Ask MGMT’ section hasn’t really been updated for a while... do you have any plans to start that up again?
ANDREW: <laughs> Yeah, I think we should. We enjoy connecting with fans and answering questions, so hopefully we will.

CDM: Late last year a teaser video for your documentary ‘Camp MGMT’ with French site La Blogotheque was posted online, when will the final version be released?
ANDREW: That’s a good question, and it’s a question we asked our managers last time we saw them and we haven’t got an answer back. It seems like it should be coming out soon. I don’t know what happened, it just got dropped off or something. It was fun and we played a couple of our songs, it sounded pretty good. It didn’t sound great or anything, but it looked really cool.

CDM: Your music videos are often really abstract and include ‘out of this world’ elements - what do you believe is the key to the human race reaching a higher level of consciousness?
ANDREW: Uhhmmm... spend less time on Facebook! <laughs> I don’t know. I think that people would be surprised by how much you can accomplish through concentrated thought, and it sounds so cliché but positive thinking and focused thought-energy. I think that it’s not... it doesn’t have to be some monumental thing. People are a lot closer than they realize.

CDM: Quick-fire question time! If you could be a dinosaur which one would you be?
ANDREW: I would be a Brontosaurus at this point.

CDM: On a scale of one to ten, how much did you enjoy dressing as Daphne from Scooby Doo at Voodoo Fest?
ANDREW: I was really hungover that day... I’d say probably a six.

CDM: And what’s in store for MGMT this year?
ANDREW: We’re out touring until April, then working on the third album, 'MGMT'.

CDM: Any final words to your New Zealand fans?
ANDREW. We love you, and come to our shows and hang out! We can go record shopping together maybe, get some coffee or something.


MGMT return to New Zealand to play Auckland's Logan Campbell Centre on March 17th (all ages) and Wellington's The Hunter Lounge at Victoria University on March 19th (18+) - tickets are on sale now! MGMT's album 'Congratulations' featuring the singles 'Flash Delirium', 'Siberian Breaks', 'It's Working' and 'Congratulations', is available in-stores or digitally.


http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/music/breakdown/2841
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Oonagh on February 28, 2011, 05:53:31 PM
Great! I've been waiting for this to come out thank you thank you
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: puredaze on February 28, 2011, 10:07:47 PM
That was a great interview! I like that they asked about the doc and him dressing as Daphne. thanks for posting!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: JessRabbit on March 01, 2011, 12:05:03 AM
yes great interview, but damn andrew, yousa a hippocyrte! hungry hungry HIPPOcryte!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on March 01, 2011, 09:01:42 AM
great interview indeed...just one thing
CDM: What are your thoughts towards the whole social networking craze?
ANDREW: I don’t know. I don’t want to sound like an old fogey or elitist or anything, but I think it’s pretty disgusting. I mean, it’s just wasting a lot of people’s time and distracting them from what real life is. It’s just this weird little world which is fuelled by vanity and looking at pictures of yourself. It’s kind of gross to me I guess.


Are forums like this one included in that "social networking craze"? -.-
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on March 11, 2011, 04:06:42 AM
a couple i found today..

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/mgmt-to-wow-the-future-music-festival-20110310-1bo94.html (http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/mgmt-to-wow-the-future-music-festival-20110310-1bo94.html)

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/entertainment/music/after-the-fall/story-e6freeuu-1226019670302 (http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/entertainment/music/after-the-fall/story-e6freeuu-1226019670302)

Also MGMT will be on triple j talking to Tom & Alex on Monday somewhere between 6am and 9am (Australian time). Note that Tom and Alex arent the greatest presenters so this interview will either be really bad or actually kind of amazing..?

stream triple j live at --- http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/ (http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/)

UPDATE: the interview http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/tomandalex/blog/s3163112.htm
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Oonagh on March 13, 2011, 11:11:27 PM
^oh good you posted both interviews I found too :) and a third one! nice
The tripplej interviewers didn't seem that bad at to me probably because I heard a lot worse. They also seem like nice guys

Many nice new stuff inside

Oh and how about the email correspondence! rghrrgh
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: rosyy on March 17, 2011, 06:29:50 AM
there is also a video attached to this one, so i will post it to the other thread...
http://www.3news.co.nz/MGMTs-special-St-Patricks-Day-memory/tabid/418/articleID/202887/Default.aspx
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: reptar on March 18, 2011, 12:52:28 AM
ANDREW: A lot of lyrics in 'Someone’s Missing' and a little bit in ‘I Found A Whistle’ were influenced by the book ‘The Diary Of A Drug Fiend’ by Aleister Crowley - just little things that I picked up from that. Also I liked reading some Carl Jung books, like ‘The Archetypes Of The Collective Unconscious’ which is like symbols in dreams and stuff which was really cool. And also ‘Be Here Now’ which is kind of like a 60's New Age hippy-something. Usually when I write lyrics I try to read a lot and listen to a lot of other stuff. Some of my favourite lyricists are like Lou Reed, kind of the classics - Bob Dylan and stuff like that.

Very interesting literary influences! Now I'm picturing Andrew as Pvt. Joker in Full Metal Jacket.

Colonel (aka the people who dont 'get' MGMT): You write "Born to Kill" on your helmet and you wear a peace button. What's that supposed to be, some kind of sick joke?

Andrew: The duality of man. The Jungian thing, sir.  ;)

I do feel that duality in Congratulations when I listen to the album from start to finish. 
Playful and lighthearted on the one hand, disillusionment and questioning on the other.  I think that's why there was such a strong reaction to it from everyone.

I have vague memories of reading Jung in college, but have never read Aleister Crowley. Crowley's estate, the Boleskine House, was once owned by Jimmy Page.  I wonder if Andrew wants to live in that castle some day.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Oonagh on March 19, 2011, 07:50:37 PM
^ Hah, I must see it again. I saw it when I was 13 or 14 so I don't remember much :/
Jung is really awesome. I loved the personality test someone did a thread for here on the forum. I went to learn more about it and found out it's his. After that I've read some articles about the archetypes and it's crazy how much it helped me understand some of my dreams. I should read that book next.

Anyways: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/arts-life/4777753/Electric-ideas (http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/arts-life/4777753/Electric-ideas)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 26, 2011, 03:53:29 AM
http://www.powerofpop.com/?p=8126#more-8126 (http://www.powerofpop.com/?p=8126#more-8126)
review with pics
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on March 26, 2011, 12:59:38 PM
[url]http://www.powerofpop.com/?p=8126#more-8126[/url] ([url]http://www.powerofpop.com/?p=8126#more-8126[/url])
review with pics


err i would have spit on that audience
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 28, 2011, 06:16:39 AM
Singapore review-check the link-lots of pics

The prayers of Singapore’s indie fans, that is. On Thursday night, the mighty heroes of indie, MGMT and The Whitest Boy Alive, gathered and performed a one-off double bill at Suntec’s Convention Hall. ActuallyMAG got down to business and witnessed the spectacle firsthand.

Let us start off by doing a little stalking on the bands themselves. MGMT, who were the headliners of the event, had never stepped onto the sunny shores of Singa-land. We were lucky to be part of their Asia tour, before it ends at Seoul on April Fools’ Day.

The Whitest Boy Alive too, were on their Asia tour. However, they were no strangers to Singapore; having previously performed for Juice’s 10th Anniversary at Zouk. Furthermore, frontman Erlend Øye, is one half of Scandinavian band, Kings of Convenience, who last serenaded crowds at 2010’s Mosaic Festival.

The night opened with local band, Muon, dishing out experimental alternative sounds for the crowd. The set felt a little lacklustre. The front man spoke with a meek-ish demeanor, and the performance felt like it was not given the best effort. The crowd’s response to the band was lukewarm at best.

After about 30 minutes of waiting, The Whitest Boy Alive came on. And boy did they get the crowd riled up. Erlend Øye stepped forth and showed us how a geeky bespectacled dude can appear as the coolest guy alive. They got the crowd dancing on their feet with their funky tunes, playing popular hits such as Courage and Intentions off their latest album. They also played new unreleased songs such as Bad Conscience and Upside Down. Erlend Øye exhibited impeccable crowd participation as he encouraged everyone to sing along, seducing even my friend who has never heard of them.


Erlend and Marcin, synchronizing their goofy antics
Also, it was funny how a teenage girl next to me kept constantly proclaiming how much Erlend Øye really looks like Napoleon Dynamite. And strangely enough though, I agree.


Erlend Øye... or Napoleon Dynamite in disguise?
And finally after what seemed to be a million years, MGMT took to the stage and relentlessly opened with their single, It’s Working. Many fan favourites such as Time To Pretend and Kids were played and promptly sent the crowd into a crazed frenzy.


Andrew VanWyngarden, against the dizzy arrays of trippy lights present at MGMT's performance
However, we felt that the performance had room for plenty of improvements. For one, the setlist felt like it could use better planning. There were one too many moments where the crowd would go into a complete standstill simply because the excitement curve was missing. When they performed Siberian Breaks, it was obvious that the crowd was not responsive at all.

We also felt that MGMT’s set was a little marred by the sound mix. On one too many occasions, the jangling guitars would soar to a piercing level that was simply unpleasant. Andrew VanWyngarden could also have taken a leaf out of Erlend’s books and engaged in more crowd participation.

All in all, we felt that the night’s true shining performance was given by The Whitest Boy Alive. They stole the show with their showmanship and had a generally better setlist. Could also be because of Erlend’s glasses, or him looking like Napoleon Dynamite.

And finally, the concert was life threateningly refreshing. Not because the bands were so good it changed my entire perception on live acts; but it was the fact that I have never been to a concert where the ground wobbled and felt like it could give way. Especially when songs like Time To Pretend and Kids came on, it felt so scary and surreal to the point where I stopped prancing around in fear of my life.

Naïve, as I have been told; but caution is the operative term here.

- Text by Toke, images by Zhiwei
http://actually.com.sg/mag/?p=1658 (http://actually.com.sg/mag/?p=1658)

Lala's note:  Me thinks the writer hasn't really listened to Congratulations.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 30, 2011, 11:45:22 AM
http://www.esquire.my/People/Q-and-A/article/MGMT-Perez-Hilton-doesnt-know-anything-about-music (http://www.esquire.my/People/Q-and-A/article/MGMT-Perez-Hilton-doesnt-know-anything-about-music)

Eff you, Perez.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on March 30, 2011, 04:33:34 PM
Hey people! I will be posting translations (soonish) of the magazine interviews MGMT (well Andrew and Ben separately) did in Maribor.
I found the interviews only recently, and they say really nice things about the fans.  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on March 30, 2011, 05:30:11 PM
Hey people! I will be posting translations (soonish) of the magazine interviews MGMT (well Andrew and Ben separately) did in Maribor.
I found the interviews only recently, and they say really nice things about the fans.  :)

whuut which magazine? x)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 30, 2011, 05:31:34 PM
Hey people! I will be posting translations (soonish) of the magazine interviews MGMT (well Andrew and Ben separately) did in Maribor.
I found the interviews only recently, and they say really nice things about the fans.  :)


Thanks Voodoo!  Much appreciated  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on March 30, 2011, 05:39:13 PM
Hey people! I will be posting translations (soonish) of the magazine interviews MGMT (well Andrew and Ben separately) did in Maribor.
I found the interviews only recently, and they say really nice things about the fans.  :)

whuut which magazine? x)

I don`t know what magazine, found it in my local library. It`s a long ass interview with Andrew, two pages long.
Thinking about tearing the pages out when I get it.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on March 31, 2011, 05:43:52 PM
Hey people! I will be posting translations (soonish) of the magazine interviews MGMT (well Andrew and Ben separately) did in Maribor.
I found the interviews only recently, and they say really nice things about the fans.  :)

whuut which magazine? x)

I don`t know what magazine, found it in my local library. It`s a long ass interview with Andrew, two pages long.
Thinking about tearing the pages out when I get it.

hh. DO IT! (and scan) :P
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on April 01, 2011, 04:14:59 PM
Andrew being all nice, lovely and smart. Talks about inspiration, how MGMT works as a band, and how important their fans are.


Congratulations to Psychedelia


MGMT`s concert was the first concert of their European tour, on which they promote their new album Congratulations. MGMT`s main creative core are Ben Goldwasser and Andrew Vanwyngarden, who met at university in the year 2000. At first, they both didn`t intend to form a proper band, however their creative minds and youthful enthusiasm soon got wrapped up in a form of the first incarnation of MGMT, The Management. After years of musical education the band renamed themselves into MGMT, and is at the moment one of the hottest names on the world`s music scene. In fact they are so popular, that even the French president Nicholas Sarkozy has illegaly used their music. We talked to Andrew Vanwyngarden before the band`s concert in Maribor.


Your concert in Maribor kicks off your European tour
True, but we`ve been on tour since early March. We released our second album Congratulations in spring and things are going great. We had our first American headline tour and almost every show was sold out. The responses to the new songs have been excellent. Despite the initial doubts from music critics, the songs reached the people and they responded really positively to them.

Speaking of music critics, they especially, described your second album as a radical departure from your debut. In a sense that, Oracular Spectacular had more hits, was easier to listen to, and more appealing to a wider audience.
Ben and I were both very surprised by the success of the first album. You should know that we started playing music in a naive way, like kids, students. We met at Wesleyan University and at first, we only played eachother the music we liked. Then we started to create our own ideas and play them, they were heard by friends, who had friends and through the Management, the group we had previously formed, MGMT was born.

And yes, a lot of people liked our music and our debut album was successful. New doors had opened because of them not just for our careers, but also for creating new ideas. A human constantly grows and evolves, and every year we are more able to understand the world and our position in it. The second album Congratulations is a reflection of a certain era, of growth, and most importantly a tribute to our musical idols. The ones who`ve been inspiring us through the years, we even invited some of them to work with us.

The second album might not be that easily accessible, but it is full, complete and honest and people have felt that.  

Where have you found the inspiration for the new album?
All over the place. Everyone in the band is a music nerd, and we each have had different musical experiences and practices which consciously or subconsciously influence us. Those are the basics which we worked from.

Of course there are other, everyday experiences and impulses that affect us and we express them through music. Our main musical inspiration from this album was the psychedelic music of the 60`s crossed with the underground music of the 80`s.

Many people might find Congratulations unlistenable at first, but its true value is understandable after a few more listens.

You said you were very surprised by your success. How do you stay grounded?
Sometimes being in a successful band feels really weird, unusual and surreal. When you`re playing your music to 10 thousands of people it feels great, as does waking up in a different city every day while on tour. You can easily get confused and carried away by all that, and we are all aware of that. After all we`ve all been close to that a few times and we can admit that.

Through the years we`ve formed a great team and we look after each other. We are like a family and have an open and honest relationship, based on trust. Music is our priority and we`re aware that we`re lucky to be in this position, not everyone is as fortunate, if any of us starts to threaten this, we warn him and try to find the problem and solve it.

We`re also alert to people that come into contact with the band. We want to know their intentions. If they are good we let them in, if they aren`t we say goodbye.

You said, you`ve been touring for almost a year promoting the album. What are the pluses and minuses of touring?    
The pluses are the gigs and the connection to the audience. Ben and I have established a great group of people, that is easy to live and work with. That is very important for the band because we spend a lot of time together.

The minus is all the travelling but even that is manageable with the right company.

How does MGMT prepare for the tour?
There`s not a lot of preparation because we are always on tour and that`s our way of life. Obviously we have rehearsals where we polish the songs to perfection. We also prepare all the instruments and gear that we`ll be taking take with us. It`s also important to relax while on tour, meet friends and family and detach from the fact that you are a musician. That is also a form of relaxation that we pay special attention to.


Do you agree that music is only a part of MGMT`s artistic expression? Your entire image and music seem very visual.
We are primarily musicians and that is our central artistic expression. Our visual image is important, but not as important as it is for The White Stripes, for example. It`s true that we`ve found visuals that are close to us and paid attention to those components. We try to form visuals by imagining how our music would look like if it could be seen.
This is noticeable in our videos and our live shows.

Your website is also very visual. You`ve even asked fans to upload their art. How so?
We`d played tons of concerts and eventually fans started coming up to us after the gigs with their own interpretations of our music. Some drew, some took pictures, others filmed and put something together. For us those creations are priceless. Can you imagine someone getting so into our music that it serves them as an inspirational platform? It can`t be replaced by any amount of money, award or a high entry in a music chart. These artists got the point of our work many times, so we`ve decided to give their art a space where others can see it too. With internet that is also possible and it was understandable that we would put them on our website. It`s a sort of a visual display that we`re extremely proud of.

It appears your fans are very important to you.

The most important. We have a special relationship that stems from mutual respect, an example of that could also be seen after we released Congratulations. Some said that this is an ideal album for alienating our fan base, but the fans remained loyal to us. People have been attending the live shows, buying our albums and have forum discussions…

We took a bit of a risk with this album, but when the thing was recorded we said: "Yes this is what wanted, this is it." But at the same time, we were aware that we might encounter misunderstanding and rejection. Luckily that didn`t happen, on the contrary, the album`s been out for 7 months and I can guarantee that the bonds with our fans got stronger because of the complexity of the album.

This is the first time you`ll be performing in Slovenia. MGMT will stand in front of a crowd that will have to be won over. Have you any concerns?
When you first perform in a new country you don`t know what to expect and that`s always a challenge. We`ve heard some things about Slovenia, like the fact that there is a musically informed audience that follows modern music trends, alternative and mainstream. If we`re concerned? It`s nice to communicate with people through music, the feeling is surreal and intangible (?).

At the moment the band is in a great place;  We`re pleased with ourselves, pleased with the reception of our music and with the fact that we are able to do, what we do. You can feel it on stage and combined with our music our positivity is infectious, even for those who`ve never heard us before.  


And before we finish, we have to mention your song Kids, that Nicolas Sarkozy and his party used at a rally against illegally downloading music on the internet.
We were warned about the matter by our French fans. We don`t want to get involved in politics because it is insincere and hypocritical. We are sincere musicians and artists and want our work to be treated with respect. With the unauthorized broadcasting of our music, this is was not the case. They used our song to promote a law that would punish people for downloading music illegally, and that didn`t feel right to us. We`ve sorted the disagreement out now and there is no bad karma between us.

interview conducted by Žiga Gombač (magazine Glasna, December 2010 edition)


Ben talks sex and drugs, indie music and attitude, Congratulations, etc.


Maribor waits for MGMT


MGMT has become a big name on the indie music scene in the recent years, and at the same time releases music under a major music label. I guess indie now describes the style and the attitude towards creating?
In this situation the label "indie" is a but unusual and maybe is unjust towards the band that are still trying to breakthrough and are under indie labels. MGMT is sonically loyal to alternative rock roots. We definitely create and play original music.

In my opinion, what is indie about you is also the fact that you have decide not to make an album that is another Oracular Spectacular, but veered towards psychedelia.
As stupid as it sounds, we produce what we feel. We never consciously decide to make a hit or something else. We just made an album that sounds like it sounds.

Alright, but you are a part of a machine. I talked to the Klaxons in the summer, and they followed their label`s wishes, returned to the studio with a new producer and handed in a "more acceptable" album.
I don`t know. I guess we`re lucky that people who take care of us at our label, understand us because we have free reign over our music. They haven`t given us any hints about doing something different.

Do you agree that the first album had a lot of New York vibe and the new one has a more Californian vibe?
You can tell that we`re from Brooklyn on the first album. We started working on Congratulations during winter, and at first we were recording in a town close to NY. The cold, wind and lack of color were affecting us a lot, and so we decided to move to a warmer place. We recorded most of the new record in Malibu, and the Californian vibe can be heard in our sound.
  
The duality between the places can be strongly felt in Siberian Breaks, supposedly the best epic song the Beatles never wrote. To me it sounds more like The Mamas and The Papas.
They say that? Wow! I agree that it has the Mamas and the Papas influence and sound, that retro Californian feeling that we were going for: surfing, the beat, the beat movement, organ arrangement, polyphonic singing…

Justice`s remix of your hit Electric Feel won them a grammy, Sebastian Ingrosso sampled Kids into a dance anthem Kidsos, Erol Alkan made a remix of Congratulations, the title track, I myself, discovered you through Mixmag. Apparently you rockers can dance?
These collaborations happen in lots of different ways, sometimes the record company suggests them, sometimes other artists find us directly. I like the fact that people remake or cover our music, I like to listen to where they take them and I like when the songs sound a lot different than the original recording. I think the creativity of the one who covered it can be shown that way. As a band we don`t consider ourselves as part of the dance scene, I`m not interested in it, I prefer rock. I think it`s interesting tat we`ve been noticed in dance clubs.

Eric Morillo told me that "stoned sex" is undoubtedly better. What`s your experience with psychedelic substances? (The boys admitted to taking extacy in the past.)    
It`s hard to say, I find sex to be more memorable if I am somber. The feelings themselves can be intensified with the help of certain drugs, but the memory of sex lasts longer without them.

What about drugs and music? I have noticed and can confirm that they can stimulate creativity in the studio, but I`m not so sure if they work as well on stage?  
Some drugs help you reach new perspectives, to distance yourself from the normal consciousness, and they give you a completely different perspective on ordinary things. You can get carried away quickly though, and you lose focus and touch with reality.
I`ve heard a lot of music where it was obvious that the artist was too high while he was recording it. That`s not good.

Your European tour will take off on the 8. PWC. What will you be playing, hits or the new album?
Half and half, We`ll be presenting some new songs and some songs form the previous album including the hits, and the songs from the EP that was released before the first album. Something for a wide audience and definitely dancey.

Your music was praised by Paul McCartney. Is there a chance of you ever performing together, if you won`t be working with him in the studio? (WTF!?!)
That would be wonderful but I don`t know how to answer to that. It all mostly depends on Paul. I have a feeling we won`t be working together anytime soon, unless he comes to us.  

Interview conducted by Gregor Zalokar (magazine Stop)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on April 01, 2011, 05:47:25 PM
Thank you Voodoo!

These questions and answers made me a bit teary tbh...
They are truly BEYOND amazing to their fans and it is very admirable.


Your website is also very visual. You`re even asked fans to upload their art. How so?
We`d played tons of concerts and eventually fans started coming up to us after the gigs with their own interpretations of our music. Some drew, some took pictures, others filmed and put something. For us those creations are priceless. Can you imagine someone getting so into our music that it serves them as an inspirational platform? It can`t be replaced by any amount of money, award or a high entry in a music chart. These artists got the point of our work many times, so we`ve decided to give their art a space where others can see it too. With internet that is also possible and it was understandable that we would put them on our website. It`s a sort of a visual display that we`re extremely proud of.

It appears your fans are very important to you.

The most important. We have a special relationship that stems from mutual respect, an example of that could also be seen after we released Congratulations. Some said that this is an ideal album for alienating our fan base, but the fans remained loyal to us. People have been attending the live shows, buying our albums and forum discussions…

We took a bit of a risk with this album, but when the thing was recorded we said: "Yes this is what wanted, this is it." But at the same time, we were aware that we night encounter misunderstanding and rejection. Luckily that didn`t happen, in the contrary, the album`s been out for 7 months and I can guarantee that the bonds with our fans got stronger because of the complexity of the album.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on April 01, 2011, 06:33:36 PM
Thanks for taking out time to translate these interviews Voodoo! :) It really makes me smile to know how much they appreciate their fans.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 01, 2011, 07:03:36 PM
Voodoo thank you so much for your translation!  That's obviously not off of Google translator and I know it was a lot of work.  I really appreciate your time...you did a nice job of capturing Ben and Andrew's voices.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on April 02, 2011, 03:30:21 AM
Thank you Voodoo!

These questions and answers made me a bit teary tbh...
They are truly BEYOND amazing to their fans and it is very admirable.


Your website is also very visual. You`re even asked fans to upload their art. How so?
We`d played tons of concerts and eventually fans started coming up to us after the gigs with their own interpretations of our music. Some drew, some took pictures, others filmed and put something. For us those creations are priceless. Can you imagine someone getting so into our music that it serves them as an inspirational platform? It can`t be replaced by any amount of money, award or a high entry in a music chart. These artists got the point of our work many times, so we`ve decided to give their art a space where others can see it too. With internet that is also possible and it was understandable that we would put them on our website. It`s a sort of a visual display that we`re extremely proud of.

It appears your fans are very important to you.

The most important. We have a special relationship that stems from mutual respect, an example of that could also be seen after we released Congratulations. Some said that this is an ideal album for alienating our fan base, but the fans remained loyal to us. People have been attending the live shows, buying our albums and forum discussions…

We took a bit of a risk with this album, but when the thing was recorded we said: "Yes this is what wanted, this is it." But at the same time, we were aware that we night encounter misunderstanding and rejection. Luckily that didn`t happen, in the contrary, the album`s been out for 7 months and I can guarantee that the bonds with our fans got stronger because of the complexity of the album.


I know it made me so happy to read it and I thought other people would be too if they could read it.
Thanks guys, it was quite a lot of work.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mouret on April 02, 2011, 09:13:54 AM
Thank you, it's greatly appreciated!  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on April 02, 2011, 01:03:42 PM
Finally some good questions!!!  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Oonagh on April 02, 2011, 01:30:48 PM
Andrew: "Can you imagine someone getting so into our music that it serves them as an inspirational platform?"
Oonagh: Duh!

:)

Thank you Voodoo for this. You did a splendid thing!  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on April 02, 2011, 02:20:00 PM
That was a REALLY good read! Thank you soooo much for sharing!  :-* :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on April 16, 2011, 06:48:05 AM
has this been posted anywhere already? however, i feel sorry for Andrew...paparazzi won't even let him sleep :/ although there's a cool comparison with the Queen in here x)  http://soundcloud.com/thisisellie/mgmt-coming-to-hong-kong
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 16, 2011, 08:59:30 AM
has this been posted anywhere already? however, i feel sorry for Andrew...paparazzi won't even let him sleep :/ although there's a cool comparison with the Queen in here x)  [url]http://soundcloud.com/thisisellie/mgmt-coming-to-hong-kong[/url]


It just occurred to me, listening to this, that we stand a chance of hearing some new material at Outside Lands!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on April 16, 2011, 10:42:32 AM
If your prediction is true, you guys are lucky duckies! n__n

Nothing too new (except the last bit) but I actually enjoyed that!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: keytarsaurus on April 24, 2011, 05:35:15 PM
MGMT's Ten Commandments interview + photos/video :)
http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/music/interviews/3111-the-ten-commandments-of-mgmt (http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/music/interviews/3111-the-ten-commandments-of-mgmt)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on April 25, 2011, 03:42:35 AM
MGMT's Ten Commandments interview + photos/video :)
[url]http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/music/interviews/3111-the-ten-commandments-of-mgmt[/url] ([url]http://www.coupdemainmagazine.com/music/interviews/3111-the-ten-commandments-of-mgmt[/url])


nice, thanks :)

haha, first question  ;D (i think i saw someone ask it somewhere on this forum)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on April 25, 2011, 04:55:29 PM
^ That was me  ;) I can't stress enough how awesome I think it would be if they did play it live. It took me a quite a few listens to really get into it but now I LOVE it, and sometimes play it multiply times a day.  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AerophaneSorceress on April 25, 2011, 05:39:59 PM
I love that I first read MGMT's 10 commandments when my mother my mother was lecturing me on easter about the 10 commandments an telling me I need to follow them.
I laughed. As a 23 year old living far far away from her, I have always told her my religion was music. this just made me even more rooted in my decision.

Sorry for the rant, but ya. Thou shalt wear funny socks.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 28, 2011, 06:30:30 AM
 http://www.memphisflyer.com/memphis/homecoming/Content?oid=2757850 (http://www.memphisflyer.com/memphis/homecoming/Content?oid=2757850)

Andrew's Memphis Flyer interview.

"Local kid makes good" is always a nice story. So when a White Station High School graduate's musical duo made the swift rise from a Wesleyan University dormitory to the upper reaches of the international pop-music scene, you'd think it would be worth quite a bit of attention in these pages.

Not so much.

The story of MGMT has been an awkward one for us at the Flyer, because that White Station grad turned singer/songwriter/guitarist is Andrew VanWyngarden, son of our editor, Bruce VanWyngarden.

And though some who haven't quite grasped the magnitude of the band's success might disagree, we've minimized our coverage of the band's rise for that reason. But, at this point, with two albums, eight singles, and innumerable national television and feature film appearances under their belt and making their debut on one of the big stages at the Beale Street Music Festival, we felt it was finally time to give MGMT proper acknowledgment.

The band's debut album, Oracular Spectacular, was named the 18th best album of the past decade by Rolling Stone and yielded Grammy nominations in 2010 for "Best New Artist" and "Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group" (for the song "Kids"). The band began 2011 by playing in front of 40,000 fans on a beach in Argentina and will soon begin work on their third album.

Right now, VanWyngarden is probably our most significant contemporary Memphis-bred musician — non-Justin Timberlake division. And there are legions of local fans interested in the band and its Memphis connection. With that in mind, I talked to VanWyngarden (pictured above left) about coming home to play and about how Memphis shaped him:

Memphis Flyer: Where are you now?

Andrew VanWyngarden: Coachella. We're not playing. I'm doing some DJ-ing. It's nice to be able to go and see bands and not have any pressure. It's been a pretty good time. I've seen Wire, Big Audio Dynamite, Lightning Bolt.

What kind of stuff are you playing?

I'm trying to do all vinyl. I just started DJ-ing. I found a bunch of early 2000s house records in Brooklyn, and I've been playing with those. Kind of slowing them down.

I'm guessing a lot of MGMT fans, even locally, don't think of you as a Memphian. In high school, you played in a band called Accidental Mersh.

Yeah. Looking back, it was so illegal. We would play these places off back alleys downtown that were full of high school kids. Everybody drinking. But it was fun being in a high school band. I remember one time we played the New Daisy Theatre and filled it up.

We're going to be back early and have a rehearsal before the Music Fest show, and we're using the New Daisy. Back then that stage felt huge.

Was that the first band you were in that really played anywhere?

Pretty much. The big thing for me was that [bandmates] Hank [Sullivant] and Charlie [Gerber] were really knowledgeable about indie music, compared to me at least. I was still listening to whatever my sister was listening to and ska and Rancid and related things. I was just starting to listen to the Grateful Dead and Pink Floyd and classic rock.

We were all obsessed with [contemporary Memphis band] Big Ass Truck too. That's the band we really looked up to. After I was in college, when I was home, I would go to the Blue Monkey to watch the Ross Rice Band. That was amazing, seeing Steve Selvidge just wail.

Didn't you take guitar lessons from Steve when you were in high school?

No. We hung out a few times and played guitar together, and he would show me some stuff. It was never formal. My dad took guitar lessons from Sid Selvidge.

Your other high school project was called Glitter Penis. Was that strictly a bedroom recording thing?

No. That was literally bedroom recordings. That was just me and Dan Treharne, a friend from White Station. He had a pretty basic recording program, and I had never recorded anything before. We just goofed around writing songs. But Dan and I have stayed good friends. He got involved in filmmaking, and he's been with us over the past year at a lot of the shows documenting the tour. We're not sure yet how we're going to use it.

This will be the third MGMT show in Memphis. The first two were at the Hi-Tone and Minglewood Hall. What was it like to play a home show for the first time?

I really liked that Hi-Tone show. It was fun to play a packed bar show, to have a lot of my high school friends there. It was pretty sweet. The Minglewood Hall show ... that was a weird time for us. We were about to record our second album, and Minglewood was our last show.

Any favorite haunts when you're in town?

I go to Shangri-La Records, and I like going to Flashback. I would go straight to Huey's, but I've become more vegetarian recently.

You were in an odd situation where your first real single, "Time To Pretend," became a huge hit. It was a song about the tradeoffs that come with fame — "the boredom, the freedom, the time spent alone," how ridiculous it can be — written before you really had to confront that. What's it like to play that song now?

I wrote those lyrics when I was 22 or something and still in college. It was sarcastic and funny to us. It's strange thinking about writing those lyrics and then singing them on, I dunno, David Letterman or something. Or hearing people sing along to it in Kuala Lumpur. It's really bizarre.

MGMT

Friday, April 29th

Horseshoe Casino Stage, 9 p.m.



Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Oonagh on April 28, 2011, 09:48:39 AM
Yeah thanks! This is such a funny interview. I love how he is so modest and honest.
And that "I've become more vegetarian recently" :D
And how he's learning how to dj. I tried out that way too only I didn't ever play outside my house ofcourse  lol
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on May 03, 2011, 10:58:19 AM
http://www.spin.com/articles/flaming-lips-rock-mgmt-kids-cover (http://www.spin.com/articles/flaming-lips-rock-mgmt-kids-cover)

A blurb from Spin on MGMT and The Flaming Lips
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on May 03, 2011, 07:30:06 PM
Interview with Andrew and Will in Korea, though Will only says about two sentences  :-\

What Makes Brooklyn’s MGMT tick
Posted by: Groove in Entertainment  

After signing with Columbia Records in 2006, buzz about MGMT spread like wildfire throughout the New York City music scene, and soon after to the rest of the U.S and Europe. Five years, two albums and countless live shows later, the band has lived up to the hype. Today, they have emerged as an international success story, their most recent tour bringing them to Asia for the first time, with Seoul as their final stop.

Groove Korea sat down with band members Andrew VanWyngarden and Will Berman prior to their performance at AX Hall to find out what makes MGMT tick.

Why are you most excited to play here in Korea?

I think the most exciting thing is not really knowing what to expect. We’ve been playing these shows in Southeast Asia for the past week and a half, and I’ve been amazed at the energy and people singing along to our songs. There are even bigger reactions to the newer album than to the older songs, which I don’t think I would have really expected before coming here on tour. So it will be interesting to see how it is in South Korea. And it’s just exciting to play somewhere new around the world. I wish we had more time to see the city, but we’re only here for one day.

On Congratulations, some fans were anticipating songs like “Kids” or “Time to Pretend,” which were big hits. Did you want to avoid replicating that sound on the second album or was it just a natural progression?

We approached the second album just wanting to write and record the songs that we heard in our heads. We didn’t strategize as to how to become a more popular or bigger band or how to repeat the success of the first album. We really wanted to take an honest approach to it musically. From the time we wrote “Kids” and “Time to Pretend,” six or seven years had passed, so we were different people when were writing the second album. We were listening to different music and we were influenced by different things. I think if we had gone in and tried to make another song like “Kids” or “Time to Pretend,” it just would have been dishonest. It wouldn’t have felt like the right thing for us to do, or the wrong motivation at least.

It was confusing when the (second) album came out, that it was immediately tagged as obtuse or experimental, or that we were trying to distance ourselves from fans. When the whole time we were making it, we felt like we were making pop music and we were listening to music that we think of as pop music, like the Beach Boys and Velvet Underground. Those were more of the influences (on the second album), than more mainstream pop or something.

On Oracular Spectacular, there is a bit of an ironic, tongue-in-cheek kind of tone, whereas Congratulations feels more self-reflective. Would you agree with that assessment?

Well, when we started the band, it was about nine years ago and it was kind of an ironic take on mainstream pop music. We were doing these karaoke-style shows where we would sing along to pre-recorded tracks. It wasn’t a joke band, but we never took it too seriously at all. So I think the first album (Oracular Spectacular) has some of that spirit. I also think mood wise, the first album is more mystical and whimsical and carefree in a way. The second album is much more about real people and it’s more personal as an album. It’s more of an honest album. I mean I think they’re both good (laughs), but the biggest difference is just the general vibe, more so than the music.

With the second album, we were also writing it right after we stopped touring. Musically, it’s definitely more mellow and relaxed and influenced more by soft rock and folk music in a way, but I think it’s darker and more cynical lyrically. For me personally, I think that’s coming from (the fact that) I was kind of in a state of not really knowing what to do. I didn’t have an apartment and I was kind of confused and stressed out sometimes, anxious maybe, about what to do with the new album. But then at the same time, we went to California to record and it was one of the most relaxing, peaceful environments we could be in. And so it’s just a weird combination of all of these different factors.

Can you tell us a bit about the process of recording Congratulations?

We wrote and recorded it mostly in a house in California near the beach. It’s kind of in the same spirit as Exile on Main St. or something, like the Rolling Stones. We were all together in this house recording it ourselves. No one there was really an expert sound engineer, so it was a lot of experimenting. I think that’s my favorite way to record is just experimenting and learning as you do it. We haven’t ever really gone into a studio with a producer and done the hourly kind of session like that.

Some of your lyrics seem playful on the surface, but can also evoke a lot of emotion and are hauntingly catchy. Where do you find the inspiration for your lyrics? Can you tell us a little bit about what the writing process like?

It’s weird because for both of the albums we put out, the lyrics were the last piece to make the songs complete. We would have songs completely recorded and arranged and know what the melody was like, but I would still be writing they lyrics. I think it’s just the way that I write lyrics – just thinking about them over a long period of time, mostly keeping them in my head and not really writing them down.

The lyrics on Congratulations, I think more so than on the first album, were very personal. Almost every line was something that was very personal and emotional to me. Well maybe not every line, but most of the lines were really thought out. So going back to the reaction of a lot of the press to the album, they kind of reacted to it like it was something we just threw out, like something we did really quickly. It was really weird, but I don’t want to dwell on that because I feel like we are in a much more positive state right now.
 
Your creativity is apparent not only through your music, but also through your videos, your album artwork and your style. Where do you think your creativity comes from? Did you grow up in a creative household or did it just naturally progress when you were in college?

I mean, probably for Will too, but I think our college was a pretty major change for me to become more of a creative person.  I would say my family growing up were creative people. My dad is a writer and my mom did photography for a while, but I feel like it was pretty traditional upbringing.

(Will) Yeah, college was the experience where we could begin to really explore non-mainstream forms of expression in general.

(Andrew) Yeah, it was liberating (smiles). A liberating liberal arts school (laughs).

Who are some of your favorite bands right now?

There are tons of bands that I like from the past few years. I really like Girls and Ariel Pink and I really love the Tame Impala album.

(Will) I like Violens a lot, Pablo Picasso, Teen, The Acrylics.

Is there a new album in the works and can you tell us anything about it?

It’s only in the works as far as that we know it’s self-titled, which is a kind of an inside joke. Well, not inside joke, but there are so many bands that have self-titled third albums that we thought it would be clever. But we haven’t started writing or recording for it yet.

Do you want to be producers for your next album?

Well we don’t really know yet, but I think it will probably be a similar thing since we liked the way it worked out the first two albums. We have our own little studio in Brooklyn right now so we’ll probably write and record there and maybe go back and work with Dave Fridmann again. Or maybe there will be another producer involved. But I don’t think we want to get ourselves into a situation where we’re in a studio and there’s someone strongly suggesting that we change the songs dramatically or change the sound. I think it would take someone, I don’t know who, for us to listen to. Maybe like if Brian Eno (laughs) was suggesting ideas for songs we would take it into thought. But I don’t know, I think we like doing things ourselves.

By Kathy Kearns


http://hiexpat.com/korea-blog/interview-what-makes-brooklyns-mgmt-tick.html
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on May 13, 2011, 08:31:00 AM
http://epublishbyus.com/juice_may_2011/10017266# (http://epublishbyus.com/juice_may_2011/10017266#)

Here is the Juice Magazine interview
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on May 24, 2011, 08:25:32 PM
Alrighty peeps! Here's the High Times article...Sorry if the scan is shitty, Im a noob!


(http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh61/lilsarabear04/Hot%20guys/Scan0001.jpg)

(http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh61/lilsarabear04/Hot%20guys/a.jpg)

(http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh61/lilsarabear04/Hot%20guys/mgmtarticle.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on May 25, 2011, 10:22:39 PM
oh thanks sara  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on May 27, 2011, 09:11:23 PM
oh thanks sara  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on June 08, 2011, 04:04:18 PM
http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/

An interview with Pete.  He mentions MGMT quite a bit :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AerophaneSorceress on June 09, 2011, 01:41:18 AM
[url]http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/[/url]

An interview with Pete.  He mentions MGMT quite a bit :)


That's really cool thanks for sharing :) I was wondering the source of all of the Pete quotes that were on Tumblr...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on June 09, 2011, 08:27:33 AM
[url]http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/[/url]

An interview with Pete.  He mentions MGMT quite a bit :)

wait what
"There’s also a semi-exclusive MGMT fan club 7″ coming out. They’re going to do a single club thing for their fans."
am i missing something or is this sth new? (x
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on June 09, 2011, 08:33:31 AM
[url]http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/[/url]

An interview with Pete.  He mentions MGMT quite a bit :)

wait what
"There’s also a semi-exclusive MGMT fan club 7″ coming out. They’re going to do a single club thing for their fans."
am i missing something or is this sth new? (x


I wouldn't get too worked up just yet.  I'm trying to get confirmation on this.  Pete has mentioned it before but then backed off of it and said he was mistaken. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on June 09, 2011, 08:35:37 AM
[url]http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/[/url]

An interview with Pete.  He mentions MGMT quite a bit :)

wait what
"There’s also a semi-exclusive MGMT fan club 7″ coming out. They’re going to do a single club thing for their fans."
am i missing something or is this sth new? (x


I wouldn't get too worked up just yet.  I'm trying to get confirmation on this.  Pete has mentioned it before but then backed off of it and said he was mistaken. 

oh ok thanks(:.. would be great tho..
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on June 09, 2011, 06:53:30 PM
[url]http://www.rockedition.com/interviews/interview-with-pete-kember-of-spectrum/[/url]

An interview with Pete.  He mentions MGMT quite a bit :)


Once you discover MGMT, they grow on you!
I'm sure we all know this!  ;D
I absolutely know that I mention them at least once a day.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on July 22, 2011, 04:11:47 PM
I don't even like MTV, but this made me laugh:
http://www.mtviggy.com/lists/drop-the-vowels-the-top-10-all-consonant-band-names/3/ (http://www.mtviggy.com/lists/drop-the-vowels-the-top-10-all-consonant-band-names/3/)
They're on page 3.
"At this point, they can name themselves whatever the hell they want."  ;)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: TheWhistle on July 25, 2011, 04:19:15 AM
I don't even like MTV, but this made me laugh:
[url]http://www.mtviggy.com/lists/drop-the-vowels-the-top-10-all-consonant-band-names/3/[/url] ([url]http://www.mtviggy.com/lists/drop-the-vowels-the-top-10-all-consonant-band-names/3/[/url])
They're on page 3.
"At this point, they can name themselves whatever the hell they want."  ;)

hah^ :D 8)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: misty on July 29, 2011, 02:54:44 PM
Not sure where to post this or if it deserves it's own thread...so I'm posting it here

http://www.pitchfork.com/news/43372-ariel-pink-kurt-vile-on-japan-benefit-comp/ (http://www.pitchfork.com/news/43372-ariel-pink-kurt-vile-on-japan-benefit-comp/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 04, 2011, 10:59:51 AM
A father reflects on the worldwide success of his kid’s band, MGMT, which makes its Big Sur debut Wednesday.

http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/2011/aug/04/rock-star-son/ (http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/2011/aug/04/rock-star-son/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: photographyLOVER on August 07, 2011, 02:10:08 PM
A father reflects on the worldwide success of his kid’s band, MGMT, which makes its Big Sur debut Wednesday.

[url]http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/2011/aug/04/rock-star-son/[/url] ([url]http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/2011/aug/04/rock-star-son/[/url])


"Also, lots of 16 year olds follow me on Twitter, which is weird."
Same sense of humor, I love it  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: songgolf07 on August 20, 2011, 12:13:00 AM
very good,i love it.
north face jackets (http://www.shopsaleblog.org/)
canada goose (http://www.salecanadagoose.org/)
Canadian goose (http://www.salecanadagoose.org/)
canada geese (http://www.salecanadagoose.org/)
canadagoose (http://www.salecanadagoose.org/)
canada gooses (http://www.salecanadagoose.org/)
canadiangoose (http://www.salecanadagoose.org/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on September 12, 2011, 04:14:52 PM
Review of MGMT’s Late Night Tales in Mix Mag

(http://img833.imageshack.us/img833/5017/rolnt.png) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/833/rolnt.png/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on September 21, 2011, 09:32:44 AM
(http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/307107_218598721532932_101023506623788_583328_1552682769_n.jpg)

LateNightTales: "Nice article in Word about MGMT Late Night Tales"
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=218598721532932&set=a.152908568101948.32793.101023506623788&type=1 (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=218598721532932&set=a.152908568101948.32793.101023506623788&type=1)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 21, 2011, 11:20:34 AM
That's a fucked up piece of journalism.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on September 21, 2011, 01:43:55 PM
Very tired of reading garbage. I honestly didn't even read it until just a minute ago. I wish I hadn't.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 21, 2011, 02:29:23 PM
Very tired of reading garbage. I honestly didn't even read it until just a minute ago. I wish I hadn't.

I'm so sick of the ego and pretension that is so often present in journalism lately. Get over yourself.  It's not interesting or helpful.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on September 21, 2011, 11:14:39 PM
(http://img705.imageshack.us/img705/5156/coverbok.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/705/coverbok.jpg/)
Wesleyan Magazine

THE SCHOOL THAT ROCKS
In Wesleyan’s rich and ever-expanding pantheon of
alumni pop acts, MGMT and Das Racist
stand front and center.
By Eric Gershon ’98

When Teddy Gage ’05 saw Wesleyan classmate Andrew VanWyngarden’s face staring back at him in 2008 from an ad on the side of a New York City bus, he decided it was time to dig out the videos. Gage had been an English major at Wesleyan, but he took a lot of film classes and shot a lot of video around campus. “I pretty much filmed everything that I thought was interesting,” he said over the summer from Brooklyn, where he lives.

Much of Gage’s Wesleyan footage depicts live music performances. In one snippet, filmed in April 2003, VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, both ’05, play guitar and keyboard in the WestCo courtyard, assisted by a laptop. VanWyngarden, shaggy and wearing yellow pants, plays an orange guitar. Goldwasser sports a bandana, which will later become a VanWyngarden trademark. The sun casts afternoon shadows on the wall behind them as they play a cover of “This Must Be the Place” by Talking Heads. The camera’s microphone picks up with marvelous clarity the laughter, cheers, squeals and mirthful buzz of a mass of largely unseen spectators. The camera work is uneven, but also close to the action, giving the viewer a satisfying sense of being present—in this case, for the emergence of a rock ’n’ roll phenomenon.

“They would pack every venue they went to,” Gage said of VanWyngarden and Goldwasser, whose campus band, The Management, is now known worldwide as MGMT and celebrated especially for its massive hit “Kids,” a high-energy electronic fantasia they wrote in a WestCo dorm room on VanWyngarden’s birthday in 2002.

As a minor index of MGMT’s post-Wesleyan popularity, Gage’s five-minute “This Must Be the Place” clip had more than 1.9 million views as of early August. Three years after the video’s posting, it continues to generate comments—more than 3,000 so far, a predictable mix of praise and reproof. “I would do anything to be there in that crowd,” says one poster. “I cover a MGMT song every time I get on stage,” says another, apparently a musician. “It feels that good.” (A fan video for “Kids” has had nearly 40 million views.)

It’s no stretch to call MGMT big: A deal with Columbia Records; appearances on Letterman, Saturday Night Live, and the cover of Spin; international tours; praise from Rolling Stone as one of “40 Reasons to Get Excited About Music;” an invitation from a Beatle to open for his current act; and two recent Grammy nominations, including one for “Best New Artist.”

“Big is opening for Paul McCartney at Fenway Park at his request,” says Matt Ashare ’87, a former music critic and editor for The Boston Phoenix.

For decades Wesleyan has enjoyed a reputation for its graduates’ outsized influence in Hollywood and the arts generally. Lately, the spotlight frequently falls on alumni in pop music, thanks especially to VanWyngarden and Goldwasser, who met as WestCo freshmen—but not to them alone.

A pair of their contemporaries, Himanshu Suri ’07 and Victor Vazquez ’06, who perform as the rap group Das Racist, are also drawing crowds coast-to-coast and overseas. They first came to wide attention in 2009 for their rap “Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell,” an Internet sensation, and are scheduled to release their first album, Relax, in September. Along the way, they’ve offered a steady stream of provocative commentary seemingly irresistible to pop culture writers drawn by their sense of humor and liberal arts pedigree. Last year The New York Times Magazine gave its full-page interview of Suri ’07 and Vazquez ’06 a cheeky three-word title: “Straight Outta Wesleyan.”

Press accounts of Das Racist, MGMT and up-and-coming acts in their collegiate orbit often mention the school, giving rise to some perhaps hyperbolic but welcome assessments of Wesleyan’s role in the current pop scene. The Village Voice tried to explain it in a 2009 story called “The Wesleyan Mafia: How a Connecticut liberal arts school became the epicenter of surrealist Brooklyn pop.”

Vazquez has a theory to explain the phenomenon: “I think people still find college-educated rappers novel.”

Says Suri: “I think it’s all MGMT’s fault.”

That may be, and MGMT’s VanWyngarden can live with it: “I like that Wesleyan kind of gets credit for spawning good music,” he says.

Ashare, who spent more than 17 years at The Phoenix, said the bands’ Wesleyan connection gives writers a story that’s about more than the music alone. “Every feature writer needs a hook to hang a story on. And in this case, I think MGMT and Das Racist play nicely into the general impression that a lot of people in the know have of Wesleyan, in terms of being not just a great academic institution, but also a place that attracts smart, creative people.”

Music scholars have long known Wesleyan as a pioneer of ethnomusicology, or the study of non-Western musical traditions, such as Javanese gamelan, and as an incubator for avant-garde music. John Cage, the experimental musician, was a fellow at Wesleyan’s Center for Advanced Study in 1960–61 and 1969–70, two lengthy episodes in his decades-long association with the university and its faculty. Ravi Shankar, the legendary Indian sitarist (and father of pop sensation Norah Jones) played at Wesleyan on one his first U.S. tours, also in the early ’60s. The overlapping rise of MGMT and Das Racist has trained attention on the innovations of alumni performers and on Wesleyan itself as a wellspring of hip, smart, fun pop.

Wesleyan alumni made their first marks in pop music decades ago. In 1961, as undergraduates, The Highwaymen—Robert Burnett, Stephen Butts, Chandler Daniels, David Fisher and Stephen Trott, all ’62—reached the #1 spot on the Billboard charts with their song “Michael (Row the Boat Ashore).” John Perry Barlow ’69 collaborated with Bob Weir of The Grateful Dead to produce lyrics for many of the band’s songs, including “Estimated Prophet,” “I Need A Miracle,” “Hell in a Bucket,” and “Mexicali Blues.” Dar Williams ’89 has been a major figure in folk for nearly two decades. And Amanda Palmer ’98 of The Dresden Dolls essentially invented a new genre of theatrical rock performance typically described as “Brechtian punk cabaret.”

The rise of a new crop of Wesleyan-affiliated acts hasn’t gone unnoticed by their predecessors. The Mobius Band (Peter Sax, Ben Sterling, and Noam Schatz, all ’00) nodded self-deprecatingly to the success of certain famous newcomers in a recent Web post: “We formed a band the fall semester of our freshman year at Wesleyan... This was back in the late ’90s, friends—back before every band you’ve heard of went there.”

Some of the new bands even keep in touch. MGMT’s Goldwasser says he and VanWyngarden see Suri and Vazquez of Das Racist “pretty frequently” when neither act is on the road: “We still have a lot of the same friends in New York. It’s pretty hard to leave the house here without running into someone from Wesleyan.”

As MGMT and Das Racist deepen their stamp on pop culture, several other bands with Wesleyan ties are making a serious run at life onstage, or living it already. Cantora Records, which in 2005 issued MGMT’s first EP—with “Kids” and “Time to Pretend” on it—has signed at least two other Wesleyan-affiliated acts, Bear Hands (with Ted Feldman ’09 and Dylan Rau ’07) and Francis and the Lights (Francis Farewell Starlite ’06). Santi White ’97—best known as Santigold—has toured, collaborated or performed with Coldplay, Bjork, MIA, Jay-Z, and others, and is expected to release her next album this fall. Simon O’Connor ’05 (a mainstay of Amazing Baby) and Will Berman ’04 (part of MGMT’s live band) are now both part of Ill Fits, and Bottle Up and Go (Keenan Mitchell and Fareed Sajan, both ’09) is on the rise.

“It’s not just MGMT,” said Jesse Israel, Cantora’s co-founder.

Diverse in their sounds and styles—described variously as “experimental pop” “electro-funk,” “electro-rap,” “indie rap,” “Brechtian punk cabaret,” “punk disco,” “’80s Pop throwback,” and “a mix between Prince and Phil Collins”—Wesleyan’s alumni bands are hard to pigeonhole. “They have about as much in common as the ‘Typical Wesleyan Student,” says Palmer, perhaps best known for her Dresden Dolls song “Coin-operated Boy.”

Still, says Ashare, “You might be able to say that there’s a Wesleyan attitude in the sense that Amanda Palmer/Dresden Dolls, MGMT and Das Racist are all smart, unconventional, left-of-center artists who have found a certain degree of mainstream success.”

Rich in irony, playful self-mockery and intelligent fun, that attitude pervades their music, lyrics, and public comments. Of her new record, now in progress, Palmer jokes: “It’s going to sound like a combination of MGMT, Das Racist, Dar Williams and Santigold. You’re going to LOVE it.”
Some of Wesleyan’s professional pop stars were music majors (Goldwasser and VanWyngarden) but, in true liberal arts fashion, many built their academic experience around other subjects. Palmer majored in German, Suri in economics, Williams in theater and religion. VanWyngarden seriously considered majors in astronomy, environmental science and studio art before settling on music. Whether or not they came to Wesleyan looking for musical inspiration, a lot of these future pop stars found it—in fellow students, in professors, in the classroom.

“Even by the end of freshman year I was in a few bands,” says VanWyngarden, who recalls a Neely Bruce course in Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier as an eye-opening experience. “Nothing too serious. I was in this mostly ’80s hair-metal ballad cover band called Born to Kill—some of the most fun I’ve ever had playing in those shows. There’d be, like, 10 of us on stage. It was the most fun ever. My sophomore year I was going to Eclectic and playing music in the basement a lot with friends. From the first week it was very clear that music was very important to a large part of the student body.”

Palmer says she still feels she owes “heaps of thanks to [Professor of Music Emeritus] Alvin Lucier for single-handedly introducing me to the wonders of John Cage, Terry Riley, Laurie Anderson, and Steve Reich through Experimental Music 101. And [Professor of Music Emeritus] Jon Barlow, who taught the introduction to western music course, deserves some serious props—just for standing there and infecting the students with his passion about Mahler. I didn’t know someone could care about classical music so fiercely.”

Then there was life outside the classroom. Wesleyan offered what Goldwasser called “a fairly loose social structure” in which it was easy for students to stage informal public performances—inside WestCo, outside WestCo, at Eclectic, on Foss Hill. “So many of the social activities come from people organizing things themselves,” he says. “It allowed us to do what we were doing without caring too much about the organizational side of things, or dealing with the bureaucracy.” Just as important for MGMT’s early development, he says, was “the open-mindedness” of fellow students. “No matter what you did,” he says, “somebody was probably going to appreciate what you were doing.”

By all accounts, there was no shortage of appreciation for The Management, the proto-MGMT. “I don’t think you could’ve gone to Wesleyan in those years without hearing ‘Kids’ played at every house party,” Suri of Das Racist told The Times earlier this year. As best Goldwasser and VanWyngarden can remember, The Management played its first live show at the WestCo Café in ’01 or ’02, performing the theme song from the 1984 film Ghostbusters for about 20 minutes. Recordings of “Kids” eventually began circulating at other colleges, inspiring a pair of NYU students, Israel and Will Griggs, to offer to promote and manage them.

In September 2005, a few months after VanWyngarden and Goldwasser graduated, Israel and Griggs, then still at NYU, issued the “Time to Pretend” EP with a half-dozen songs. “It’s these six songs that really powered our company,” says Israel. “This album cost $400 to make and it’s sold hundreds of thousands of digital singles.” MGMT later signed with Columbia Records, a division of Sony, and Columbia issued the band’s first full-length album, Oracular Spectacular in 2007, with new versions of “Kids” and “Time to Pretend.” MGMT’s second album, Congratulations, came out last year, and the band is now at work on another.

“I’m just excited to write music with Ben again,” VanWyngarden said in August from Los Angeles, as MGMT began a short California tour. “We’re not the kind of band or duo where it’s writing all the time. It’s a pretty distinct sort of world from touring for us.”

At colleges everywhere, each new class generates new bands. As Adam Gunther ’11 of Los Angeles prepared to attend Wesleyan, he thought he might take a rest from music. But he found he couldn’t stop once he got to campus. “I came here and everyone played music all the time,” Gunther said in an interview last May, just before commencement. “It was unavoidable. You couldn’t not play music with all that going on.”

Gunther joined Flora and Fauna, a “dance/power-pop” act that includes three other Wesleyan alumni—Matt Bernstein ’11, Gabe Gordon ’11 and Charlie Ellis ’13—plus Casey Baird. This year the group won Eclectic’s annual “Battle of the Bands,” a shot of encouragement before moving on to a bigger stage. “We’re all moving back to L.A. to keep playing,” said Gunther.
It might not be long before you see their faces on the side of a bus.
Or hear that MGMT has reemerged on campus.

VanWyngarden pictures it this way: “An old-school Management show. In a house. Karaoke-style.”

http://magazine.wesleyan.edu/ (http://magazine.wesleyan.edu/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 22, 2011, 03:44:28 AM
^college journalist...no ego present.  Thanks for posting Rose  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AGM on September 22, 2011, 09:15:52 AM
Thanks Rose! :), I really enjoy read things like this, that place must be inspiring...
It also makes me think how much they have grown and all the wonderful things that they have achieved...I'm glad for them :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on September 23, 2011, 04:24:48 PM
You're welcome Lala and AGM  :)

I agree with you, AGM. It's nice to get more insight into the orgins of the band and that time spent at college. It obviously had a huge impact and was a special time for them.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: -Rose- on October 06, 2011, 09:38:27 AM
Andrew appears in the NME/Uncut magazine special edition issue 501 Lost Songs You Need To Hear Now. He recommends a song in the genre of psychedelia - big surprise  :D

Shuggie Otis
Inspiration Information (1974)
"The first time I heard this track [from Shuggie Otis' 1974 album 'Inspiration Information'] I couldn't believe how spaced it was. It's psychedelic R&B. I was young, so it had a real impact. He's such a complex musician - he gets jazzy at times on here but it's still so smooth. It's the best album for summertime."

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: puredaze on October 06, 2011, 10:02:07 AM
Andrew appears in the NME/Uncut magazine special edition issue 501 Lost Songs You Need To Hear Now. He recommends a song in the genre of psychedelia - big surprise  :D

Shuggie Otis
Inspiration Information (1974)
"The first time I heard this track [from Shuggie Otis' 1974 album 'Inspiration Information'] I couldn't believe how spaced it was. It's psychedelic R&B. I was young, so it had a real impact. He's such a complex musician - he gets jazzy at times on here but it's still so smooth. It's the best album for summertime."

aw I love Shuggie Otis! My mom played his music a lot when I was growing up. Although I think it's interesting Andrew described it as psychedelic R&B- I never thought of it that way.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AGM on October 06, 2011, 10:37:51 AM
Andrew appears in the NME/Uncut magazine special edition issue 501 Lost Songs You Need To Hear Now. He recommends a song in the genre of psychedelia - big surprise  :D

Shuggie Otis
Inspiration Information (1974)
"The first time I heard this track [from Shuggie Otis' 1974 album 'Inspiration Information'] I couldn't believe how spaced it was. It's psychedelic R&B. I was young, so it had a real impact. He's such a complex musician - he gets jazzy at times on here but it's still so smooth. It's the best album for summertime."

aw I love Shuggie Otis! My mom played his music a lot when I was growing up. Although I think it's interesting Andrew described it as psychedelic R&B- I never thought of it that way.


I'm listening to it now, I don't know him but it sounds amazing, it is interesting. I think Andrew discribe it very precisely, it has a very special mood.

Thanks Rose! :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on October 06, 2011, 12:14:38 PM
Aww! Shuggie is the son of Johnny Otis, which my friend Heather aka Uni and Her Ukelele used to be in his band. I totally get that Summer vibe from this track though.

Just a little side note, and Im sure pretty much all of you can relate, but I just love the fact that MGMT has introduced me to so much music which I probably wouldn't have heard of if it wasn't for them.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AGM on October 06, 2011, 01:12:49 PM
Aww! Shuggie is the son of Johnny Otis, which my friend Heather aka Uni and Her Ukelele used to be in his band. I totally get that Summer vibe from this track though.

Just a little side note, and Im sure pretty much all of you can relate, but I just love the fact that MGMT has introduced me to so much music which I probably wouldn't have heard of if it wasn't for them.

That's great Sara!, a few days ago I got Uni's records, his music beautiful :)

And I feel totally like you, I'm really grateful to them for share all those great bands, a lot of them really amazed me.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: puredaze on October 06, 2011, 06:33:33 PM
Aww! Shuggie is the son of Johnny Otis, which my friend Heather aka Uni and Her Ukelele used to be in his band. I totally get that Summer vibe from this track though.

Just a little side note, and Im sure pretty much all of you can relate, but I just love the fact that MGMT has introduced me to so much music which I probably wouldn't have heard of if it wasn't for them.

PRECISELY.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on October 06, 2011, 08:17:15 PM
Same here! They actually opened my mind to music as a whole which I appreciate so much, even if it wasn't specific bands they've talked about. I still need to check out the "MGMT influenced" thread or whatever it's called :x
I keep telling myself to do so but I never do >.<
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: reptar on October 06, 2011, 10:53:21 PM
Aww! Shuggie is the son of Johnny Otis, which my friend Heather aka Uni and Her Ukelele used to be in his band. I totally get that Summer vibe from this track though.

Just a little side note, and Im sure pretty much all of you can relate, but I just love the fact that MGMT has introduced me to so much music which I probably wouldn't have heard of if it wasn't for them.

PRECISELY.

and it runs the gamut too! Everything from the Cleaners From Venus to Charlie Feathers. 
They wanted us to dive into this world, and they gave us a soundtrack for the experience  :)

(I wish I could remember where I saw/read the Dive into this world quote...)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on January 05, 2012, 02:44:23 AM
I'm not sure if anyone has posted this before and I have'nt been on the forum for a little while so my apologies if someone else has shared this bus this blew me away.

On The Memphis Flyer website, theres a lovely long 2 part article (plus a web-only segment) on Andrew. Now of course we love all our boys but there's quotes from Bruce VanWyngarden and pictures of a baby Andrew (that was almost too much).

Even if this is already on the forum, I think some revisions have been made  :) Happy New Year Everyone and enjoy! ;D

Here's the link to the articles

In The Beginninghttp://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/ (http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/)

The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden, Part One: "Oracular Spectacular" and Beforehttp://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/ (http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/)

The Future Is Nowhttp://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/ (http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on January 05, 2012, 05:00:06 AM

I'm not sure if anyone has posted this before and I have'nt been on the forum for a little while so my apologies if someone else has shared this bus this blew me away.

On The Memphis Flyer website, theres a lovely long 2 part article (plus a web-only segment) on Andrew. Now of course we love all our boys but there's quotes from Bruce VanWyngarden and pictures of a baby Andrew (that was almost too much).

Even if this is already on the forum, I think some revisions have been made  :) Happy New Year Everyone and enjoy! ;D

Here's the link to the articles

In The Beginning[url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/[/url] ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/[/url])

The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden, Part One: "Oracular Spectacular" and Before[url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/[/url] ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/[/url])

The Future Is Now[url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/[/url] ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/[/url])



It's actually not the Memphis Flyer-that's a weekly newspaper that Bruce edits.  It's Memphis Magazine.  It has it's own thread http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=9979.0 (http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=9979.0)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Mell2045 on January 05, 2012, 12:35:23 PM

I'm not sure if anyone has posted this before and I have'nt been on the forum for a little while so my apologies if someone else has shared this bus this blew me away.

On The Memphis Flyer website, theres a lovely long 2 part article (plus a web-only segment) on Andrew. Now of course we love all our boys but there's quotes from Bruce VanWyngarden and pictures of a baby Andrew (that was almost too much).

Even if this is already on the forum, I think some revisions have been made  :) Happy New Year Everyone and enjoy! ;D

Here's the link to the articles

In The Beginning[url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/[/url] ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/In-The-Beginning/[/url])

The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden, Part One: "Oracular Spectacular" and Before[url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/[/url] ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2011/Test-AVW/[/url])

The Future Is Now[url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/[/url] ([url]http://www.memphismagazine.com/Memphis-Magazine/December-2011/The-Future-Is-Now/[/url])



It's actually not the Memphis Flyer-that's a weekly newspaper that Bruce edits.  It's Memphis Magazine.  It has it's own thread [url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=9979.0[/url] ([url]http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=9979.0[/url])

You guys are good ;), I have no idea why I did'nt think the forum would have jumped on this. I'll delete it :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Gold Coast on January 22, 2012, 06:24:58 PM
Not sure if this has been posted, but:
intercoursemag.com/preview
you have to flip through quite a few "pages" but then the interview is there.
ONLY PROBLEM IS YOU MIGHT NEED A MICROSCOPE TO READ IT
killed my eyes but I managed  :P

edit--sorry i dont know why it isn't a link but that's copied and pasted from the browser so i guess just type it, sorry
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: pavement on February 14, 2012, 08:36:39 PM
I apologize if this doesn't really belong here, so i'll remove it if need be. The following is an interview with Cheval Sombre, he talks about his upcoming second album which was recorded at Blanker Unsinn with Sonic Boom and features Andrew on several tracks. Gillian Rivers (who did some work on Congratulations) also makes an appearance on the album. Pretty neat stuff, can't wait to hear the finished product!

Anyways, read and enjoy :D

http://musictimestwo.blogspot.com/2012/02/cheval-sombre.html?m=1 (http://musictimestwo.blogspot.com/2012/02/cheval-sombre.html?m=1)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on March 18, 2012, 01:24:07 PM
http://diario.latercera.com/2012/03/18/01/contenido/cultura-entretencion/30-104125-9-andrew-vanwyngarden-sonamos-distinto-a-cualquier-otra-banda-de-la-ultima-decada.shtml (http://diario.latercera.com/2012/03/18/01/contenido/cultura-entretencion/30-104125-9-andrew-vanwyngarden-sonamos-distinto-a-cualquier-otra-banda-de-la-ultima-decada.shtml)

Andrew talks about the new album -  "Ben and I have been writing since early this year. We do not know when it will be ready, but the material is much more positive, more open, and less rigid."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 18, 2012, 01:27:29 PM
[url]http://diario.latercera.com/2012/03/18/01/contenido/cultura-entretencion/30-104125-9-andrew-vanwyngarden-sonamos-distinto-a-cualquier-otra-banda-de-la-ultima-decada.shtml[/url] ([url]http://diario.latercera.com/2012/03/18/01/contenido/cultura-entretencion/30-104125-9-andrew-vanwyngarden-sonamos-distinto-a-cualquier-otra-banda-de-la-ultima-decada.shtml[/url])

Andrew talks about the new album -  "Ben and I have been writing since early this year. We do not know when it will be ready, but the material is much more positive, more open, and less rigid."


Dood.  It's in a furrin language.  Perhaps Other Planet could translate.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on March 18, 2012, 02:16:58 PM
[url]http://diario.latercera.com/2012/03/18/01/contenido/cultura-entretencion/30-104125-9-andrew-vanwyngarden-sonamos-distinto-a-cualquier-otra-banda-de-la-ultima-decada.shtml[/url] ([url]http://diario.latercera.com/2012/03/18/01/contenido/cultura-entretencion/30-104125-9-andrew-vanwyngarden-sonamos-distinto-a-cualquier-otra-banda-de-la-ultima-decada.shtml[/url])

Andrew talks about the new album -  "Ben and I have been writing since early this year. We do not know when it will be ready, but the material is much more positive, more open, and less rigid."


Dood.  It's in a furrin language.  Perhaps Other Planet could translate.


I have some of it translated but yes if someone else wants to finish...

Did that determine the absence of hits and the writing of more complex songs?

Well, we always did long songs. But the definitive was how our lives changed. We did Siberian Breaks (12 minute song) in 2009 and Kids in 2002. Seven years. We went from being 19 to 26. I feel proud that our changes as individuals have been reflected in our music, despite all the depressions lived. Our new album will also sound quite different.

You’re going to play something new in Chile?

Santiago seems interesting, as we’re working in a third album, but we haven't played there yet, so we’re going to play everything they want to hear, but I don’t know if it’s something unpublished, we have to be careful with the internet. We don’t want to offer something that nobody ever listened and then is available online. Let’s see how it works.

How does the concept MGMT of rescuing the ponchos and the colors comes to life?

I guess in our upbringing and the way our parent were. They always allowed us to explore creativity, play with fluorescent paint and build strange forms of art, which formed our spirits as musicians very early on.   In our hearts, we’ll always be psychedelic painters. Plus, we like to keep people alert, without knowing what to expect from us.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on March 18, 2012, 03:10:24 PM
Wow! I have just pretty much updated the main post with all/post of the interviews you guys have posted in here. It literally had not been updated for two years, I felt so guilty when I saw it.

Let that be a valuable lesson to everyone, procratination is a terrible thing that leaves you with 50 links to add and format on a Sunday night  :-[

2012 here we come......
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on March 18, 2012, 07:46:29 PM
Wow! I have just pretty much updated the main post with all/post of the interviews you guys have posted in here. It literally had not been updated for two years, I felt so guilty when I saw it.

Let that be a valuable lesson to everyone, procratination is a terrible thing that leaves you with 50 links to add and format on a Sunday night  :-[

2012 here we come......

Thank you for doing that.  I just noticed today that it hadn't been updated.  Here's another new print interview from The Third.  Too bad it's small and in Spanish. 

(http://i43.tinypic.com/zoe3a.jpg)
(http://i39.tinypic.com/2dm758i.jpg)
http://papeldigital.info/lt/?2012031801# (http://papeldigital.info/lt/?2012031801#)

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 19, 2012, 12:18:10 PM
Paige you're a star!  Thanks bb  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 26, 2012, 07:25:59 PM
Can someone please translate this shiz?  Muchos Gracias. 

Ben Goldwasser nos habla de la gira
MGMT regresa al DF
 
26 de marzo de 2012
Por  Fernanda López     

MGMT viene este 11 de abril a tierras chilangas a traernos más de su pop psicodélico. Como sabemos que muchos de ustedes quieren ir, nos lanzamos con Ben Goldwasser y nos contó cómo estará el show.

Ahorita están comenzando una gira por Latinoamérica. ¿Cómo se preparan para esto?

No hemos estado de gira desde hace mucho tiempo, así que debemos ponernos en el mood y relajarnos. Creo que, aunque debemos hacer que la música suene bien, pero lo mejor es cuando logras olvidarte de tocar todas las partes y sólo te relajas y disfrutas. Estoy muy emocionado.

¿Cómo planean sus shows?

Nos gusta intentar cosas diferentes. Muchas de nuestras canciones suenan en vivo diferente a como suenan en el álbum. A veces cuando tocamos The Handshake, al final la unimos a otra canción. Cuando escribimos el primer álbum nunca habíamos hecho una gira, así que tuvimos que encontrar una forma de tocarlo en vivo. El segundo lo grabamos con nuestros músicos de conciertos, así que no tuvimos que cambiar mucho nuestras versiones en vivo.


¿Qué es lo mejor de estar de gira?

Es una pregunta difícil de contestar, pero podría decir que lo mejor son los shows. Digo, viajar es increíble, la gente que conocemos es muy interesante, pero todo es tan apresurado que no tenemos tiempo para disfrutarlo. Tocar en vivo es una enorme descarga de adrenalina.


¿Y lo más difícil?

Tener que estar en muchos aeropuertos. Los odio. Es muy larga la espera, y te invade ese sentimiento de que vas tarde a algo. Pasar por la fila de seguridad es muy molesto.


Ya se han presentado antes en México. ¿Qué piensas de este público?

Creo que en general es un buen público, con la mente abierta y que no juzga. Sólo quieren pasar un buen rato. Esto es maravilloso para nosotros. Nos gusta sentir que podemos hacer lo que se nos ocurra en el escenario y que lo van a aceptar. En otros lugares nos ha pasado que sentimos que su no hacemos exactamente lo que la gente quiere, se van a enojar con nosotros, o algo así, y creo que no es un buen sentimiento que tener arriba de un escenario.


¿Qué pueden esperar sus fans del concierto que darán en abril aquí en el DF?

Venimos con la banda con la que tocamos en vio normalmente. Vamos a tocar una mezcla de las canciones de nuestros dos primeros discos, y unos cuantos covers. En general, pueden esperar mucha actitud y buena vibra. Seguimos tocando muy bien, pero ahora lo más importante es mostrar mucha energía, relajarnos, y pasarla bien. Sacar algo bien o tocarlo perfectamente ya es algo que está en segundo plano. Creo que será algo diferente, pero muy bueno.


Aunque tienen poco tiempo para hacerlo, ¿han conocido algún lugar en México que les guste?

Sí, nos gustan mucho todos los lugares que conocimos ahí. Nos la pasamos muy bien en la ciudad de México a pesar de que sólo estuvimos un por un par de días. No pudimos conocer mucho, pero espero que esta vez podamos conocer más lugares divertidos. Me gustaría viajar más por el país. Siempre he querido conocer Oaxaca, pero nunca he tenido la oportunidad de ir. Tampoco he ido a la playa en México, y me encantaría.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AGM on March 26, 2012, 10:50:52 PM
Can someone please translate this shiz?  Muchos Gracias. 


I will try  :)



Ben Goldwasser tell us about the MGMT tour in Mexico D.F


Right now you are beginning a tour in Latin America. How do you prepare for this?

We have not toured for a long time, so we have to catch the mood of it and relax. I think that despite that we want to our music sound great, the best thing we can feel is when you manage to forget about playing everything and you just relax and enjoy. I'm very exited.

How are you planning your shows?

We like to try different things. Many of our songs sound different live as they sound in the album. Sometimes when we play "The Handshake", in the end we join it with other song. When we wrote the firs album we've never done a tour before, so we had to find a way to play it live.
The second one was recorded with our musicians for concerts, so we didn't have to change much our live versions.

What is the best of being on tour?

It's a difficult question to answer, but I would say that the best are the shows. I mean, traveling is amazing, the people we meet is very interesting, but everything is so hurried that we do not have time to enjoy it. Playing live is a huge adrenaline rush.


And the hardest part?

Having to be at many airports. I hate them. It is very long wait, and invades you a feeling that you are late for something. Going through the security line is very annoying.

You have already been  before in Mexico. What do you think of the audience?

I think in general is a good audience, open minded and nonjudgmental. They just want to have a good time. This is wonderful for us. We like to feel that we can do what we want on stage and  the audience will accept it. In other places it has happened that we feel that if we not do exactly what people want, they will be angry with us, or something, and I think it is not a good feeling to be on stage.

What can fans expect from the concert in April here in Mexico City?

We come with the same band that we've been playing all this years. We are going to play a mix of songs from our two albums, and a few covers. In general, they can expect a great attitude and good vibes. We played very well, but now the most important thing is to show a lot of energy, we want to be relax, and have fun. Have something good on stage or play in a perffect way is less important now. I think it will be somewhat different, but very good.

Although that you have a breaf time to do it, have you ever been somewhere in Mexico that you like?

Yes, we really like all the places we visit there. We had a great time in Mexico City even though we were there only for a couple of days. We could not know much, but hopefully this time we are going to know and visit more fun places. I would like to travel more for the country. I have always wanted to visit Oaxaca, but I never had the opportunity to go. I've also never been on the beach in Mexico, and I would defenetely love it.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 27, 2012, 06:50:59 AM
Thanks bb  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AGM on March 28, 2012, 09:43:40 AM
Thanks bb  :-*

you're welcome lala :) :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on March 30, 2012, 12:54:22 AM
http://www.pagina12.com.ar/diario/suplementos/no/12-5880-2012-03-30.html (http://www.pagina12.com.ar/diario/suplementos/no/12-5880-2012-03-30.html)

An interview with Ben.  Seems interesting if anyone would be so kind to translate.  I got the main idea I guess though.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 01, 2012, 05:01:45 PM
http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/62991 (http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/62991)

Already some press about the new song (although NME does put an article on their website when anyone barely breathes)

"MGMT have debuted a brand new song on their current tour of South America - scroll down and click below to watch fan footage of the band performing the track, titled 'Alien Days'.
The New York group unveiled the song during their slot at Colombia's Festival Estereo Picnic on Friday (March 30), where they also played songs such as 'Kids' and 'Time To Pretend'.
The band have recently been working on their third album, slated to be titled 'MGMT', with producer Dave Fridmann at his Tarbox Road Studios in Cassadaga, Florida."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 01, 2012, 05:15:08 PM
[url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/62991[/url] ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/62991[/url])

Already some press about the new song (although NME does put an article on their website when anyone barely breathes)

"MGMT have debuted a brand new song on their current tour of South America - scroll down and click below to watch fan footage of the band performing the track, titled 'Alien Days'.
The New York group unveiled the song during their slot at Colombia's Festival Estereo Picnic on Friday (March 30), where they also played songs such as 'Kids' and 'Time To Pretend'.
The band have recently been working on their third album, slated to be titled 'MGMT', with producer Dave Fridmann at his Tarbox Road Studios in Cassadaga, Florida."


I'm embarrassed for NME and everything they get wrong. Tarbox is in Cassadaga, New York not Florida. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 01, 2012, 06:31:58 PM
[url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/62991[/url] ([url]http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/62991[/url])

Already some press about the new song (although NME does put an article on their website when anyone barely breathes)

"MGMT have debuted a brand new song on their current tour of South America - scroll down and click below to watch fan footage of the band performing the track, titled 'Alien Days'.
The New York group unveiled the song during their slot at Colombia's Festival Estereo Picnic on Friday (March 30), where they also played songs such as 'Kids' and 'Time To Pretend'.
The band have recently been working on their third album, slated to be titled 'MGMT', with producer Dave Fridmann at his Tarbox Road Studios in Cassadaga, Florida."


Ugh ugh ugh....fucking NME.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 02, 2012, 07:15:12 AM
Another article that seems to be basically the same
http://www.clickmusic.com/news/article/first-listen-mgmt-alien-days (http://www.clickmusic.com/news/article/first-listen-mgmt-alien-days)

Except for this bit
"The band have been working on a self-titled third record that will arrive in late 2012 or early 2013. Frontman Andrew VanWyngarden told Intercourse Magazine that he had already written five of the album's tracks."

I know this stuff isn't news for any of us but I just want to keep track of it

EDIT:
http://www.gigwise.com/news/71892/MGMT-debut-new-song-at-Colombian-festival---listen (http://www.gigwise.com/news/71892/MGMT-debut-new-song-at-Colombian-festival---listen)
http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/music/news/a374356/mgmt-debut-new-song-alien-days-video.html (http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/music/news/a374356/mgmt-debut-new-song-alien-days-video.html)
http://www.thisisfakediy.co.uk/articles/news/listen-mgmt-unveil-brand-new-track/ (http://www.thisisfakediy.co.uk/articles/news/listen-mgmt-unveil-brand-new-track/)
http://thenjunderground.com/blog/2012/4/1/video-mgmt-perform-new-song-alien-days.html (http://thenjunderground.com/blog/2012/4/1/video-mgmt-perform-new-song-alien-days.html)
http://www.411mania.com/music/news/232061/%5BVIDEO%5D-MGMT-Debut-New-Song-During-Concert.htm (http://www.411mania.com/music/news/232061/%5BVIDEO%5D-MGMT-Debut-New-Song-During-Concert.htm)
http://www.electric-banana.co.uk/news/music-news/watch-mgmt-perform-new-song-alien-days-live/ (http://www.electric-banana.co.uk/news/music-news/watch-mgmt-perform-new-song-alien-days-live/)

A snippet from one of those articles: The Italian psychedelic rock band have recently been working on their third album, which looks set to be titled 'MGMT'.
You'd think it'd be hard to fuck anything up when you're just cut and pasting!

Surprisingly enough, all of these articles were posted after the NME one  ::)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: O2BNOBX on April 02, 2012, 09:15:34 AM
Not sure if this belongs in this thread, or if it's been posted.. but it's really funny (April Fools Prank!)
http://concertconfessions.com/2012/04/giants-trade-tim-lincecum-to-mgmt/ (http://concertconfessions.com/2012/04/giants-trade-tim-lincecum-to-mgmt/)

 :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 08, 2012, 09:27:05 PM
http://shock.com.co/festival-de-stereo-picnic/articuloshock-maquina-pop-sicodelica-de-mgmt (http://shock.com.co/festival-de-stereo-picnic/articuloshock-maquina-pop-sicodelica-de-mgmt)
Translation graciously done by 0racularspectacular on tumblr

THE PSYCHEDELIC POP MACHINE, MGMT - NEW INTERVIEW WITH ANDREW (TRANSLATED)
Six years after their epic debut, one of the most illustrious bands of hipster wave comes to Colombia to perform at the Festival Picnic Stereo. We spoke with one of the members, Andrew VanWyngarden.

In 2002, Benjamin Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden founded The Management (later shortened to the acronym MGMT) with a concert at one of the dormitories of Wesleyan University in which they performed a cover of the Ghostbusters theme song.

More than a band, they were creating a game room, a space to make noise, and later they became a machine of songs that seem to be inspired by a long night of Halloween: a coil sound with songs that contain another song inside. They never imagined that eight years later would be competing at the Grammys, that Dave Fridmann-produced The Flaming Lips would be in front of her debut album, which songs of his authorship and Kids or Time to Pretend would be topping the pop charts along with songs by Beyonce, Lady Gaga and The Black Eyed Peas, or simply being in a world were they were serious about their music project.
A decade later, with two albums in released (Oracular Spectacular (2006) and Congratulations (2010)), this pair of New Yorkers are not only existing in the universe of pop festivals like Glastonbury heads or Coachella, but they are the new paradigm musical psychedelia. Before their show in the Stereo Picnic Festival in Bogota, we talked to one of the masterminds of this machine: Andrew VanWyngarden.

Where does psychedelia associated with your sound come from? What is psychedelia to you?

Although there are psychedelic influences in our music, psychedelic music was more something that Ben and I listened to, we don’t necessarily see MGMT as “psychedelic music”. To us it was more pop. What do take from psychedelia was the ability and intentions to transform people’s thoughts to a different level of what a pop song could do. Within the short format of pop, our idea was to do something that was catchy yet experimental feel.
To break these structures did you closely study general pop?

Yes, Ben and I grew up listening to many radio hits, sixties music, classic rock, folk, things that you sang as a child. After this, we weren’t afraid to not only make a song as catchy as possible, but to also make it very bizarre.

That intention, to make something bizarre, is that a way to invite people to escape from their regular routine?

Yes, it is one of the great elements of something psychedelic: it forces you to see things from a different viewpoint. When you consume a hallucinogenic mushroom it changes your world view for a few hours, not for your life but only for a while. That’s when you appreciate the little things as much as the large, light and darkness. Sometimes I think that psychedelic music is like drugs for that.

Like a critique of society from pop? Punk pop …

Yes I think that’s how we see it. Punk is more than just an attitude, it’s a sound. When we did our first performances in college, just the two of us making sounds crazy, manipulating synthesizers, machines, microphones… that was really inspired by bands like The Jesus and Mary Chain, who didn’t care what people thought, what they wanted to do was to shock the public. An artist really shouldn’t try to be an entertainer. Sometimes we do something more playful, “musical terrorism” as we call it, where we print some irony. It is difficult when interpreting songs like Kids, which is probably one of the most popular, that people like and we enjoy playing it, but always interpret it in a particular way. We try to keep a bit of sarcasm in our show, because that is part of who we are. The psychedelia will always be present.

In Oracular Spectacular, there was a recurring theme in the lyrics and melodies, a tribute to youth. What is the current relationship of MGMT with that part of life?

Although it is something important, that’s more of a theme in our first album. When I was writing these songs, I was finishing college, entering the “real world” and so talked about how we were no longer kids. It was a nostalgic feeling but also disappointing, because we were wrapping up a happy stage of life. I always talk about how David Byrne influenced me, because I heard a lot of Talking Heads at the time and they have a lot that suggests what it means to grow and be an adult.

That album and its songs were very happy, almost hymn to life …

Yes, I think so. It’s funny what happened with that first album because it was almost a joke, full of an interested and indifferent attitude at once, as a satirical commentary on pop music. It’s crazy that those songs have built us a career.

Did the success of that first album force you to take a specific path in the following steps in your career?

We weren’t expecting our first album to have the success it did, it even reached a mainstream level, sharing space in the charts with hit pop songs. That initial success shaped the way of what we should have given the second album, how we should write it. It was so wild what we did in Oracular Spectacular, we calmed down a bit for Congratulations, it’s an album that’s more personal and idealistic, more real, it has more emotional content and the presence of people we had met.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 09, 2012, 03:11:54 AM
hipster wave....
I wasn't aware that MGMT was an acronym.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: pookey on April 09, 2012, 10:38:17 AM
hipster wave....
I wasn't aware that MGMT was an acronym.

and it's too bad that the band has to constantly explain their intentions in regard to 'psychedelia'. Reminds me of Bob Dylan and 'folk'.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 09, 2012, 10:40:55 AM
hipster wave....
I wasn't aware that MGMT was an acronym.

and it's too bad that the band has to constantly explain their intentions in regard to 'psychedelia'. Reminds me of Bob Dylan and 'folk'.

Yeah, just listen to the music people and quit wasting time trying to define it. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 09, 2012, 11:12:47 AM
hipster wave....
I wasn't aware that MGMT was an acronym.

and it's too bad that the band has to constantly explain their intentions in regard to 'psychedelia'. Reminds me of Bob Dylan and 'folk'.

Yeah, just listen to the music people and quit wasting time trying to define it.

You can't put our boys in a box ;)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 09, 2012, 11:13:57 AM
hipster wave....
I wasn't aware that MGMT was an acronym.

and it's too bad that the band has to constantly explain their intentions in regard to 'psychedelia'. Reminds me of Bob Dylan and 'folk'.

Yeah, just listen to the music people and quit wasting time trying to define it.

You can't put our boys in a box ;)

Nobody puts baby in the corner. Sorry, I had to.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 09, 2012, 11:16:41 AM
hipster wave....
I wasn't aware that MGMT was an acronym.

and it's too bad that the band has to constantly explain their intentions in regard to 'psychedelia'. Reminds me of Bob Dylan and 'folk'.

Yeah, just listen to the music people and quit wasting time trying to define it.

You can't put our boys in a box ;)

Nobody puts baby in the corner. Sorry, I had to.

You know I was thinking it  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 09, 2012, 03:20:00 PM
I was just looking up some articles about the producer and mixer Ben Allen because he is producing Animal Collective's new album (he also produced MPP, Halcyon Digest by Deerhunter, Bombay Bicycle Club's newest album and a lot of rap records)

Anyway I found an article where he very briefly said something about MGMT
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec06/articles/benallen.htm (http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec06/articles/benallen.htm)
Quote
So far in Ben's career, he has been fortunate enough to work with some of the leading rap artists of the era, and that, together with his work on Atlanta crunk records, has greatly influenced the way he approaches production in general, even when producing or mixing rock and other musical genres. "For me," says Ben, "the techniques used in rap and rock all go together. I like putting 808s — which form the low-end boom of all Atlanta rap tracks — and acoustic guitars into rock songs. At the moment I'm producing a Bowie-esque synth/pop band from New York called the Management, and I'm trying to put a little bit of urban bottom and oomph in the production so that it has a deeper, harder sound.


The interview was published in the December 2006 issue of that magazine.
Here is the only thing I can find from his work with them, the "my electric feel is a happy meal" version of EF
http://www.youtube.com/v/pSYSbz8goSk

Does anybody know anything else about the work that they did together and if they recorded anymore songs together? Obviously things weren't a perfect fit/ideal because none of the tracks were released (to my knowledge) but it'd be interesting to see what they did make
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 09, 2012, 03:57:47 PM
Does anybody know anything else about the work that they did together and if they recorded anymore songs together? Obviously things weren't a perfect fit/ideal because none of the tracks were released (to my knowledge) but it'd be interesting to see what they did make

The information you have posted are really the only things I have ever come across about them working together as well.  I assumed they actually worked on the remix together given the additional lyrics.  Oh and Ben Allen is thanked on Oracular Spectacular.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 09, 2012, 04:01:21 PM
Aww man, I was really hoping you'd have something floating around with all your extensive knowledge  ;) Oh well I guess if you don't know then no one really does know except the guys themselves. I wish a little bird would pop by and give us some insight
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 09, 2012, 04:15:06 PM
Aww man, I was really hoping you'd have something floating around with all your extensive knowledge  ;) Oh well I guess if you don't know then no one really does know except the guys themselves. I wish a little bird would pop by and give us some insight

Nah maybe someone knows more out there.  I remember I looked into it a couple of years ago but I just didn't find much.  It could be just that simple though...they did the song and then that was it.   
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on April 09, 2012, 11:00:53 PM
OOOOOh I've never heard that re-worked version! I like it.
I can't help liking the demo version more, still. The voice was deeper and the music was too. It had a different vibe.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 14, 2012, 05:35:00 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/nG7Xb.png)
11th April issue of the NME
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 15, 2012, 06:21:03 PM
http://www.reforma.com/gente/articulo/653/1304105/ (http://www.reforma.com/gente/articulo/653/1304105/)

Here's an article that talks about MGMT's recent trip to the Pyramids of the Moon, how the band was eager to eat tacos, and a photo of them performing an ancient pre-Hispanic tradition.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 15, 2012, 08:47:15 PM
Link is a sign up thing and in Spanish
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 15, 2012, 08:49:32 PM
Link is a sign up thing and in Spanish

Hmm, it isn't when I click on it.  I don't know what else to do other than screenshot it and post.  It's been translated using google.

(http://i42.tinypic.com/2mruxpx.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: AGM on April 15, 2012, 10:37:06 PM
Link is a sign up thing and in Spanish

Hmm, it isn't when I click on it.  I don't know what else to do other than screenshot it and post.  It's been translated using google.

([url]http://i42.tinypic.com/2mruxpx.jpg[/url])


Thanks!!
It is nice to read that they are enjoying the tour so much :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 16, 2012, 05:15:33 AM
"the band were eager to tacos."

nuff said.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 16, 2012, 08:37:47 AM
it's google translated
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: pookey on April 16, 2012, 08:45:07 AM
it's google translated
yeah, and without error.
I wish "taco" verb
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 16, 2012, 08:48:20 AM
it's google translated

ya think?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: audrey palmer on April 16, 2012, 08:53:37 AM
well that's what i posted...i just thought you meant it was bad writing, it probably makes perfect sense in spanish
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 16, 2012, 08:55:47 AM
well that's what i posted...i just thought you meant it was bad writing, it probably makes perfect sense in spanish

No, I knew it was clearly a google translation.  Typically, I just stop reading because it's too annoying, but for some reason, I thought this one was really, really funny.  Eager to tacos just amused me because it made tacos the verb.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 16, 2012, 09:05:05 AM
well that's what i posted...i just thought you meant it was bad writing, it probably makes perfect sense in spanish

No, I knew it was clearly a google translation.  Typically, I just stop reading because it's to annoying, but for some reason, I thought this one was really, really funny.  Eager to tacos just amused me because it made tacos the verb.

With them, tacos just might be the verb ;)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: pookey on April 16, 2012, 09:16:15 AM
tacos could be a place-- to which they were eager the entire way.

(https://p.twimg.com/ApqeDD_CEAEo8XV.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on April 16, 2012, 09:24:54 AM
well that's what i posted...i just thought you meant it was bad writing, it probably makes perfect sense in spanish

No, I knew it was clearly a google translation.  Typically, I just stop reading because it's to annoying, but for some reason, I thought this one was really, really funny.  Eager to tacos just amused me because it made tacos the verb.

With them, tacos just might be the verb ;)

That's exactly why I thought it was funny  :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on April 16, 2012, 02:05:29 PM
I can't stop laughing at the 'eager to tacos'

Ok this is final: taco is now a verb.

I will taco. She will taco. It will taco. Let's go taco. I tacoed so much last night that my stomach hurts.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on April 16, 2012, 09:23:44 PM
http://www.albino.mx/blog/?p=4885 (http://www.albino.mx/blog/?p=4885)

Intervew with Andrew

What is your favorite vegetable?
Ah, I love vegetables, I love cabbage, carrots and grilled asparagus.

What is your zodiac sign? Do you believe that?
I’m Aquarius, but I still don’t know whether I believe in it or not haha.

If you were on a desert island and your best friend was dead-
Oh! He’s dead? This is a very, very sad story

Yes, he’s dead, would you eat a bit of them to survive?
Yes, haha, I think my friend would like that.

Then that would be cannibalism
Mm, no problem.

How much would you eat?
I think it depends on the friend, but I know that I would never eat the brain, that would be bad idea.

What if by eating the brain, it merged all his knowledge with yours
I think that they have tried that before, in ancient times, but it didn’t work. But if you want me to, I can try. If I were to do it, I would do it with a cup of good coffee, because I love coffee.

What was the last CD you bought?
CD? Mm, I’ve definitely downloaded some illegal things lately, hahaha

Illegal, huh?
Hahaha yes. I’m not sure why I’m smiling. But the last CD was, what was it I bought? Oh! I bought a very good vinyl collection of Faust The Faust Tapes called. It’s really good.

What is your biggest musical influence?
We have many, and I dont think there’s specific band that is the greater influence, but I’m definitely influenced by Arthur Lee of Love, the 60s band, and I think Suicide, Alan Vega and Martin Rev are in my top two.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on August 04, 2012, 11:51:17 AM
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/musikfest/mc-musikfest-mgmt-bethlehem-20120803,0,4420870.story (http://www.mcall.com/news/local/musikfest/mc-musikfest-mgmt-bethlehem-20120803,0,4420870.story)


By John J. Moser, Of The Morning Call
6:32 p.m. EDT, August 3, 2012

With electronic band MGMT's third disc in the works for months and an expected late 2012 release date already off the table, its label is clearly anxious.

So it's understandable when a Fenway Records representative asks that a reporter not ask any questions about it during an interview with lead vocalist and guitarist Andrew VanWyngarden.

But that's hard when that's what VanWyngarden wants to talk about.

"What do you want to talk about?" he asks with a laugh. "Maybe soccer?"

» The latest on traffic, delays and road construction delivered to your mobile phone. Text TRAFFIC to 52270! Message and data rates apply. Text STOP TRAFFIC to cancel, text HELP for help. Click for terms and conditions.

So despite the publicist's warning, VanWyngarden offers up details.

"We haven't done any sort of press for the album at all yet, but it's nothing too dramatic. Ben [Goldwasser, band co-founder] and I are just having a great time making the new album. … It's been going great. We're really enjoying it. We're kind of getting back into eating a lot of ice cream while we record, which helps the creative flow," he says with a laugh.

He says he and Goldwasser are working with Dave Fridmann, who mixed the second album and co-produced the first. He says the band has done three recording sessions — it expects to return after a show Sunday at Musikfest's Sands Steel Stage.

He indicates the new disc will have a sound close to the last album, "Congratulations."

"I think we're making good songs," he says. "We've got a good bit of material so far, and we're just going to keep writing until we get to a point where we feel like we've figured out what our album is going to be. So this album is just kind of like we've been able to do whatever we want.

"It seems like we're in a much freer, kind of more liberated state of mind, and not really anxious or paranoid about much these days. And I think that's the result of having both been through the experience of the first album, with the kind of unexpected, crazy buzz and everything that followed in 2008, and then the second album, which wasn't difficult for us, but because people called it a difficult album, even though I don't know why till this day."

The subject of the new album is particularly touchy because, after the runaway success of MGMT's catchy 2007 debut disc, the electro-pop "Oracular Spectacular," there was a backlash when its sophomore 2010 disc offered up very different psychedelic rock.

"Oracular Spectacular" went gold and produced the Top 10 alternative hit "Kids" and the Top 25 "Time to Pretend" — both of which made Rolling Stone magazine's Top 50 songs of the decade and the latter its 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The disc also got the group three Grammy nominations, including Best New Artist.

"Congratulations" actually charted higher, hitting No. 2 on Billboard's albums chart, but was such a departure that there was a fan backlash, and band comments were misinterpreted as meaning even MGMT was disappointed with the disc.

But VanWyngarden says nothing could be further from the truth. He blames that on the band's twisted sense of humor.

"I think that we were a little bit naïve going into the promotion and marketing and the initial interviews that we did for the album," VanWyngarden says. "Ben and I have a healthy amount of kind of just taking things a little bit lightly and not being really serious about the music we're making because we feel like music should be fun.

"I think things got a little bit twisted when we were doing our initial interviews. And somehow it got … reproduced in multiple magazines that we had intentionally committed career suicide or made something to distance ourselves from our fans with a super-experimental. And that was just pretty unfortunate and not fun to have to kind of always be back-tracking and dealing with that in interviews."

VanWyngarden says he doesn't think "Congratulations" was as different from "Oracular Spectacular" as has been suggested.

"I think it was the kind of people that really only in their minds associated us with 'Kids' that have no idea where the second album was coming from," he says.

But if there is a difference, he says. "I think that that it's cool and special that a band kind of documents its real feelings of what's going on. … I'm so happy that we didn't go into making a second album and try to recreate the kind of style of the popular songs from our first album. That would have been, not career suicide, but soul suicide in my brain."

The band played one new song, "Alien Days," at shows in South America this spring. The only other new MGMT music to surface recently is a tune for "Just Tell Me That You Want Me," a Fleetwood Mac tribute album, due out Aug. 14. MGMT plays the title song to that band's 1971 album "Future Games."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on May 08, 2013, 07:58:47 PM
So for those of you who are new to the forum, Welcome to our fabulous print thread.  This is the thread for all print reviews, articles, etc.  It's Video Counterpart is the Glacial Ways thread :)

http://www.theprovince.com/entertainment/Working+under+MGMT/8355954/story.html (http://www.theprovince.com/entertainment/Working+under+MGMT/8355954/story.html)

Working under new MGMT
 
in concert: Having survived a rapid rise and equally rapid backlash, the band members ‘don’t have to appease anybody’
 
BY ALANA COATES, POSTMEDIA NEWS MAY 8, 2013 1:06 PM
 
  0
 
STORYPHOTOS ( 1 )
 

 
Ben Goldwasser, left, and Andrew VanWyngarden, right, of the band MGMT stop in Vancouver on Monday to play the Commodore.
Photograph by: Brett Gundlock , PNG
In the summer of 2008 — eons ago when measured by the notoriously short attention span of music fans on the Internet — MGMT was the hottest band of the moment, releasing a record that captured the exuberance of youth and the anxieties of the millennial generation. Their catchy electro-pop songs were blasted from every hipster bar and dorm room on the continent.

That album was called Oracular Spectacular, and it has now sold more than a million copies. Two songs band members Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden had written while still in college, Kids and Time to Pretend, made Rolling Stone’s Best Songs of the Decade list. (If you know Kids, the catchy opening keyboard riff is probably playing in your head right now.) The album also yielded two Grammy nominations. (MGMT didn’t win, though a remix of Kids by electronic duo Justice did.) Even the band’s style — wild hair, headband tied around forehead — became ubiquitous among all the cool kids that summer.

And then in 2010, they released their second album, Congratulations. Cue the sound of a recordneedle scratch.

Goldwasser and VanWyngarden turned their backs on their burgeoning fame and made the record they wanted to make all along. A gutsy departure from their mainstream-oriented debut, Congratulations was not in the least bit what their fans were expecting. This was no ear candy to blast out of car speakers, but rather a psychedelic, arty ode to '70s rock.

While the record was praised by many reviewers for its maturity and experimental turn, the Internet exploded with blog posts calling the band pretentious and arrogant for refusing to supply more indie dance-floor hits. When MGMT omitted Kids from its set list at the Coachella festival that year, outraged fans sent out a flurry of petulant tweets. (Sample: “I’m sorry, but that’s just them being a--holes.”)

“There was a real backlash. That’s the exact right word for what we experienced when Congratulations came out,” said Goldwasser, 29.

Goldwasser put the blame on the “quick turnaround and instant-gratification” culture of music blogging, in which young people are quick to criticize things they don’t understand without offering context, he said.

He doesn’t sound bitter or angry about the initial reaction to Congratulations, just matter of fact. Oracular Spectacular may have briefly captured the zeitgeist, but it was not representative of the type of band MGMT wanted to be.

The group also suffered the fate of many modern-day buzz bands early in their careers — that of being thrust onto stages in front of enormous audiences before really having figured out how to put on a live show. Goldwasser and VanWyngarden — initially the only members of MGMT — had to find other musicians to round out the band for concerts and then had to adapt their early songs, which had been written on computer. That’s the reason Kids was off the set list for a while it was written on a lark and was never meant to be performed live (though they started playing it again recently, having retooled it for live instruments, Goldwasser said).

At this point in their career, the band members are feeling much more confident on stage, though Goldwasser candidly admits they don’t tend to have the most animated live presence, as they’ve deliberately chosen to focus on playing their instruments well instead of relying on any prerecorded help. In 2012, they had teamed up with video artist Alejandro Crawford to produce live visuals that add another element to the show.

All this tumultuous history begs the question: What next? Where does a band go after experiencing the poles of critical adulation and scorn?

“It’s actually really nice that things chilled out for us a little bit in terms of buzz. We never expected things to pick up as quickly as they did,” Goldwasser said.

In the past year, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden have had to figure out how to work together again. Touring and being around each other constantly for years put a strain on their friendship, Goldwasser said.

“Friends who have to make business decisions together don’t often stay friends. The fact that Andrew and I get along at all today is pretty amazing. We’ve been in such stupid fights now that when I look back on it all, it’s like, ‘We were fighting about a song?’"

They’ve also been recording their third album since the beginning of the year, which could be released in September if Internet rumours can be trusted. A video of the band performing a new song called Alien Days surfaced on YouTube in March; the song has a fuzzed-out Pink Floyd vibe that doesn’t signal a return to MGMT’s pop past.

Goldwasser said he’s not ready to talk about the new album yet, but it can’t help but come up obliquely in conversations about the band’s future.

“We’re set up at this point where the next album can be whatever we want it to be. We don’t have to appease anybody in order to stay relevant, because I think we managed to prove we’re a band that cares more about authenticity and doing what we feel like,” he said.

He’s trying not to worry what people might think of the new songs while he’s writing them, because he said he can tell when a band writes a song in response to how they’re being portrayed in the media.

Another plus side of surviving the Congratulations backlash is that fans who come out to MGMT’s shows nowadays know what to expect from the band. They’re the ones who have embraced the group’s psychedelicrock side, not those who were tapping their feet impatiently waiting for Time to Pretend.

“It seems like there are still people out there who are waiting to hear what we do next, and I hope they like it.

“Or maybe they’ll just be p--sed off that we didn’t make another record that sounds like Congratulations.”

In concert

When: Monday, 8 p.m.

Where: Commodore Ballroom, 868 Granville St.

Tickets: $58.50 at ticketmaster.ca


© Copyright (c) Postmedia News

Original source article: Working under new MGMT
 
 
 

 
 
 

 

 


 


Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on June 20, 2013, 01:04:55 PM
MGMT brings its sunny psychedelia to sold-out Artpark show
By Jeff Miers | News Pop Music Critic
on June 20, 2013 - 7:05 AM
 
The new psychedelia came to Artpark on Wednesday. MGMT played a sold-out show at the Lewsiton venue, and an air of spacey euphoria prevailed. Interestingly, the night after classic rock band REO Speedwagon played Artpark, the youth took over the park. The majority of the crowd appeared to be 20 years of age or younger.

MGMT, a duo comprised of Andrew VanWynGarden and Ben Goldwasser, presided over what amounted to a celebration of the new hippie movement. Aided by a trio of backing musicians - drummer Will Berman, bassist Matt Asti and guitarist James Richardson - the MGMT crew brought a sunny psychedelia to Artpark, offering up a cross-section of its two albums, “Oracular Spectacular” and “Congratulations.”

Van WynGarden emerged first, dressed in loose white clothes, wearing sunglasses, and sporting a mane of long unkempt hair. He looked super-cool, aloof, as if floating above the proceedings. To VanWyngarden’s left, partially obscured by a bank of keyboards, sat Goldwasser, dressed in white and sporting a serious pair of shades. Next to Goldwasser sat a laptop, which seemed to be running sequences throughout the evening.

MGMT wants to be the Pink Floyd of its generation, Wednesday’s Artpark show made clear. But it’s not the Floyd of late ’70s arenas that the band is interested in. Rather, the late ’60s Syd Barrett-led version of the Floyd is MGMT’s primary influence. When the group kicked into “Let’s Pretend” early in the set, a massive screen behind the group offered trippy visuals that perfectly accentuated the music, and the crowd split the difference between a wide-mouthed stare and gyrations that would be more familiar at an EDM show. This lent an interesting dichotomy to the gig, as if a whole new generation of dance-party loyalists had encountered a tribe of hard-core music-heads and decided to party with them.

So the band, a rather sleepy lot, more than willing to let the light show do most of the work for them, took to the stage with a lovely blend of electronica and real-time musicianship in the form of “Introspection.” This was a richly-layered piece with plenty of harmony vocals, and it revealed MGMT to be its own generation’s version of Mercury Rev and the Flaming Lips.

“The Youth,” one of several brilliant post-modern observations populating “Oracular Spectacular,” was an early highlight, a celebration of the band’s marriage of neo-psychedelia and post-modern pastoralism. The sound was full, thick, rich in the bass region, and rather beautidully mixed, from beginning to end.

Not surprisingly, the uber-funk gem “Electric Feel” brought things rather decidedly into the party region. The mix of EDM and classy ’70s funk turned Artpark into a vibrant rave, as the masses bobbed and weaved, from the pit directly in front of the stage to the heavily populated hill all the way in the back.

The new psychedelia is here, it’s strong and MGMT is one of its leading lights. Wednesday’s show, the band’s first in Western New York, made it plain that the future of progressive psychedelic music is in extremely good hands.

MGMT

Artpark

Wednesday


It would have been nice to hear "Let's Pretend."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on July 22, 2013, 10:30:13 PM
Are we going to try and keep this thread updated? It's falling behind  :'(

July 2013 - The Fly http://issuu.com/theflymagazine/docs/the_fly_july_2013_edition/4?e=6995507/3831409 (http://issuu.com/theflymagazine/docs/the_fly_july_2013_edition/4?e=6995507/3831409)
(http://image.issuu.com/130701115426-e04c263f637bab10a26c2a5704848cee/jpg/page_4.jpg)
(http://image.issuu.com/130701115426-e04c263f637bab10a26c2a5704848cee/jpg/page_5.jpg)

July 2013 - NME  http://tdawgsmittyy.tumblr.com/post/54513857248/nme-july-issue (http://tdawgsmittyy.tumblr.com/post/54513857248/nme-july-issue)
(http://25.media.tumblr.com/65e15933d710954a1dc80689919fbfb3/tumblr_mpd7njJLVw1rw8wjro1_500.png)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/cfc74ae0ea95b1ebac02c7c157749e38/tumblr_mpd7njJLVw1rw8wjro2_500.png)

July/August 2013 - Relix http://www.relix.com/features/2013/07/12/mgmt-surviving-saturn-s-return#.Ue34VI3FWJp (http://www.relix.com/features/2013/07/12/mgmt-surviving-saturn-s-return#.Ue34VI3FWJp)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/6d4c75dbb9959a404c3bfe69b237df88/tumblr_mpokdwNPL51qdvse6o1_500.png)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/054d9af2595e724ef4650ac7d7c55d5a/tumblr_mpokdwNPL51qdvse6o2_500.png)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/b7cd359cf7fa65803dffd685c7095603/tumblr_mpokdwNPL51qdvse6o3_500.png)
(http://25.media.tumblr.com/5ba7b7d7614ac7f794a83ee0236bfcb9/tumblr_mpokdwNPL51qdvse6o4_500.png)
(http://25.media.tumblr.com/bfab1ec8c3f1dc2c00cb0a8b8f52dffe/tumblr_mpokdwNPL51qdvse6o5_500.png)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on July 23, 2013, 07:43:27 AM
Are we going to try and keep this thread updated? It's falling behind  :'(

July 2013 - The Fly [url]http://issuu.com/theflymagazine/docs/the_fly_july_2013_edition/4?e=6995507/3831409[/url] ([url]http://issuu.com/theflymagazine/docs/the_fly_july_2013_edition/4?e=6995507/3831409[/url])
July 2013 - NME  [url]http://tdawgsmittyy.tumblr.com/post/54513857248/nme-july-issue[/url] ([url]http://tdawgsmittyy.tumblr.com/post/54513857248/nme-july-issue[/url])
July/August 2013 - Relix [url]http://www.relix.com/features/2013/07/12/mgmt-surviving-saturn-s-return#.Ue34VI3FWJp[/url] ([url]http://www.relix.com/features/2013/07/12/mgmt-surviving-saturn-s-return#.Ue34VI3FWJp[/url])


Well I was going to mention that a couple of things that have been posted elsewhere really should be here but I didn't want to sound Cunty  ;D

So yes, to newbs and anyone who has forgotten, this thread is for print articles, reviews, etc.  It's a great resource.  Any video interviews should be posted in this thread:  Glacial Ways (http://mgmtforum.com/index.php?topic=7189.0)

I'm so ready for video interviews <3
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on July 23, 2013, 10:30:06 AM
Well I'm even guilty of it. My first thought was to post here like we usually do but I decided to post one in the new album thread because that was seeing a lot of action and I wasn't sure how many people would see it here.  But you are right, I want Glacial Ways to be the happening place.  Can't wait to see some videos!!!   

I think I am going to go back and edit my previous post so the are all here in print.   
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on July 23, 2013, 12:17:07 PM
Well I'm even guilty of it. My first thought was to post here like we usually do but I decided to post one in the new album thread because that was seeing a lot of action and I wasn't sure how many people would see it here.  But you are right, I want Glacial Ways to be the happening place.  Can't wait to see some videos!!!   

I think I am going to go back and edit my previous post so the are all here in print.

Thanks Lisa!  Everyone, please don't be shy about posting any print interviews/articles that you find.  I'm not a googler and most of what I come up with is stuff people send to me.  It takes a village to keep the forum updated when we have an imminent release.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 06, 2013, 12:49:04 AM
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/bf71ea89f8a0d86f53f625b53967eb7e/tumblr_mr4iqrPrhM1qdvse6o1_500.jpg)

BBC Interviewed Andrew and Ben today (August 5, 2013) and you can listen here http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b037lc9b (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b037lc9b) 
In case this gets taken down here are some parts that I have transcribed....

BBC: MGMT, back in the United Kingdom.  Gentleman, a round of applause. You have to join in or it's just me and it's gonna be really sad.
*Ben claps, Andrew attempts to*
BBC: What a dainty form of applause you have Andrew.
Andrew: I have a bum shoulder.
BBC: Oh really?
Andrew: Yeah, I had shoulder surgery.  I can't even raise it up.
BBC: What happened?
Andrew: I dislocated my left shoulder for the 5th time.
BBC: 5th time?! That's a repetitive injury, how did you do it this time?
Andrew: I can't tell you that. But it did involve an animal.
BBC: You made it a lot worse than the truth here. Just by letting ambiguity do what it's designed to do you've sort of...
Ben: We'll leave it at that.
BBC: I don't know if you should is my point.

BBC: Self-titled new album is finished.
Andrew: In the bin.
Ben: The record bin, that is.
BBC: Exactly, we were just rifling through and look what we found, prestige vinyl... in the record bin. When did you finish it?  When was it done?
Andrew: Uhh... it was done mid March, I think.
BBC: Was it an easy record to finish?  Records I think aren't necessarily easy to finish.
Andrew: It's weird, it wasn't necessarily.  We've experienced what you were talking about before and this time when we finished the last song, which is the last song on the album, I felt like that was it.
BBC: Was it fun to make it?
Ben: Yeah it was fun. It was actually... I think we've never felt more relaxed during the process even though it was challenging and we worked ourselves very hard but at the same time I think we felt like it was kind of a magical sense of making something that was really good the whole time and we weren't beating ourselves over whether it was good enough or you know whether people were going to like it or whatever.

BBC: You sort of have Congratulations to thank for that I reckon in a way.  You can look back on that album and go it did sort of set you free in a way.
Andrew: I think you're right.  I mean umm it was a bit of a struggle at times...the whole experience of like going around playing shows and feeling like we were on the defense or something...
BBC: PLAY KIDS!!!!!  Like, SHUT UP!!!
Andrew: That still happens.
BBC: Yeah but that's a good song.  But do you know what I mean?  At least people know it's part of a body of work as opposed to having to answer for it...having those big records early on...it can be a bit of a rod at times.
Andrew: Yeah I think we got through the very hard part of the mountainous trail.  Hopefully now it can be like...
BBC: If I notice how weird you are now, it's all good.
Ben: There are plenty of bands who go through the same thing and now nobody brings up that part of their history anymore.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 07, 2013, 02:15:35 PM
MGMT Interview with X-Posure
https://soundcloud.com/xfm/mgmt-on-x-posure

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on August 07, 2013, 02:43:07 PM
"Our eyes are pretty open and we're kind of shouting at people in a way."
I am so excited for this album.
They sound so confident, I love this.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 12, 2013, 07:34:45 PM
Andrew's interview with triple j
http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/media/s3823822.htm (http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/media/s3823822.htm)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 16, 2013, 02:49:34 PM
http://www.yourlocalguardian.co.uk/leisure/showbiz/10619581.MGMT__We_re_not_trying_make_hits/ (http://www.yourlocalguardian.co.uk/leisure/showbiz/10619581.MGMT__We_re_not_trying_make_hits/)

We play shows, and we've seen people react to the songs from the second album, and have received six-page hand-written notes from people about how our music has moved them, or saved them from whatever terrible dark moments they had, and that's the kind of thing that's really fulfilling.

This put a huge smile on my face.  Lives being touched... on both ends. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on August 18, 2013, 12:07:25 PM
This is recentish and interesting

http://staticmultimedia.com/music/andrew-vanwyngarden-of-mgmt-interview (http://staticmultimedia.com/music/andrew-vanwyngarden-of-mgmt-interview)

Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT Interview
Posted by Interview People on July 26, 2013 in Music | 13 Views | Leave a response

Ice cream, aliens and revolution. Andrew VanWyngarden talks about his passion for King Cone, extreme jamming, and poetry – as well as Brian Eno, Prince, and Sir Paul McCartney. In addition to that he opens up about double standard politics, the US spying on everybody, and cheeky British journalists.


I expected the album to be out in late 2012, but then it got pushed back to June. Now it’s early September. What happened?

We pretty much took most of 2011 as a break. And that was really good for us. We did a few shows and did this really kind of special performance at the Guggenheim Museum.

As part of an exhibition for some Spanish artist?

I think Italian. Maurizio Cattelan, the sculptor. They hung a bunch of his most famous works from the center down through the spiral of the Guggenheim by metal cables. We put pieces like LED light strips going up the spiral that were reacting to our sounds. It was pretty fun.

So we did that, and we were getting together a few times, but really it wasn’t until late January in 2012 that we wrote Alien Days, which is the first song we finished recording. And that’s when we really started thinking more about and figuring out what we wanted to do with our new album. So, we were working pretty quickly for our standards. But we’́d just go up in two weeks sessions to work with Dave Fridmann. And then it ended being about a year total of working. We finished the album in early March of this year.

I saw a picture of you working in the studio. It looked like a tiny room full of gear. Was it a feverishly intense scenario?

It was a new approach for a lot of the songwriting for us. We just took a room, the live room in Dave Fridmann’s studio at Tarbox Road, and it’s kind of a built in a barn. It’s got a pretty high ceiling and a carpeted floor. We just set up like our whole arsenal of keyboards and guitars and bass and a drum set and a piano, and drum machines and just everything we had pretty much, all running through Dave’s board. It was all recorded at the highest quality. And so it was pretty freeing and fun for us because we could just go in and do a 3 or 4 hour long improvisation with really no goal or pressure to write anything in our heads.

Dave would take notes and it would all be recorded and multi-tracked. And then sometimes we would just kind of forget about it for a while and go back and listen to it, and come across like little moments – even if they were 20 or 30 seconds. We had no idea who was making which sound or where they came from and all this stuff. We just felt like these were kind of like little alchemical, magical moments.

Sounds like you had hours and hours on tape that you had to go through afterwards in order to find the part you needed?

Yeah, yeah. (chuckles) But it was fine. It was a fun way to work because then you kind of have this very unique moment that you can build off. Two of the songs on the album – “A Good Sadness” and “Orphan Of Fortune” – are pretty much entirely like the main, the meat of the song is just a section of one of the improvs. Like the chord progression and everything. But then you have a song like “Plenty Of Girls In The Sea” and “Alien Days” which were much more kind of written in the style that maybe the first and second albums were written in. Just kind of acoustic guitar and piano or something. And trying to come up with a chorus (chuckles) and a verse and all this stuff.

Is this taking the experimental approach to a new level?

I guess so, yeah. We’ve always felt like maybe we constrict the flow a little bit with the way we usually kind of will cut off an idea or just not really give it a chance or choke it by over thinking it, over analyzing it or manipulating it too much. So, one of the goals for the new record was to kind of just let things be themselves. And so, if a sound came and came only once, then we just let it go. I mean, maybe it would sound a little bit uncomfortable at first, but then we realized the more we listen to it, it sounds natural. And so it’s okay for things to be new and slightly unsettled for a second. Cause eventually maybe it’ll turn into something different.

How much ice cream was involved? And what brand or flavor are we talking about?

A whole lot. I mean, more than ever I think. The Fridmann’s, especially Dave’s wife, was upset at the fact that we really forced them to eat a lot of ice cream while we were there. I mean, there’s a place called King Cone that has a giant fiberglass gorilla like King Kong mounted onto the front of the building, holding an ice cream cone with glowing red eyes. I always kind of go for the more traditional flavors like the chocolate and vanilla. Occasionally I would do a dip, which is taking hard ice cream and dipping into this kind of candy topping that hardens on top of it and creates a shell. (laughs)

Is that the secret ingredient on this album?

(chuckles) I had too much ice cream. I think it did something to my brain. I actually collapsed in… I mean, it wasn’t all that serious. But I fell down in the parking lot of this ice cream place. I just didn’t know what was happening. Actually, I had these feelings a lot while we were recording as almost every day around 5:30 or 6 – I don’t know if it was low blood sugar or not enough coffee or too much coffee or some other very weird thing that was happening – but I just felt like I was on another planet or something. (laughs)

Hence the topic of the songs – the alien within?

(laughs) Yeah, maybe so.


mgmt-cvr-300


How do you come up with stuff like that? I mean, it feels like a lot of people out there are actually controlled by aliens, aren’́t they?

Yeah, yeah. Maybe that’s how a song like “Your Life Is A Lie” comes around. It’s observing some people and the way they behave and the way they construct their whole lives and just being very perplexed as to how someone could operate with… I know this is really ambiguous, but I want to keep it ambiguous. But with the drive for the ambitions that they have, it feels completely alien and opposite to what we want with our lives. And so, that song “Your Life Is A Lie”… I think it’s not to be taken as a negative message. It’s actually supposed to be like something that a listener can take and use as a weapon. I mean, responsibly, but directed towards someone who is in their head. They’re living an alien and kind of awful or evil existence. I think it can be really powerful in that way.

Is it meant to be like a warning to the listener as well?

It is. That’s why we wanted the cowbell on every, conk, it’s just kind of hitting you over the head repeatedly. (laughs)

So is this social commentary – on people and politics?

I think there are other moments like that on the album where we’ve never really wanted to be blatantly political. I don’t think we are, but we can’t help but be kind of affected and influenced by the stuff that’s happening. It goes into the lyrics and the music. It played a pretty big part in the new songs I guess.

Like, you’ve got to confront it somehow? Without being too blatant?

You don’t want to just disregard it, yeah.

How do you feel about Edward Snowden, Wikileaks and the government spying on the entire world? How scary is that?

Yeah, even our song like “Cool Song No. 2”, which kind of probably is the one song on the album that dips most into this sort of scary conspiratorial side of things that are possibly happening on a high level in the political and government worlds. And we really don’t like coming out and talking about it, but something like Edward Snowden and the spying thing is really frightening.

But what’́s more frightening, him telling all his secrets or being spied on in the first place?

I think the most frightening thing is that I feel like – and I think a lot of people will feel the same way – is that since I’ve been on the internet maybe since I was 15 or 16 or something, I’ve just always assumed that that was happening anyway. I’ve always just been like: “Oh, they’re watching every move I make.” And for some reason that didn’t come across as being a bad thing. But it is a bad thing. I mean, where do you draw the line? Some people are like: “Well, I’m not doing anything wrong, so it doesn’t matter.” But it’s just a privacy thing. And that’s a basic right that I think shouldn’t be violated. And to be comfortable and fine with that being violated at all times for everybody is just despicable, I think. (laughs)

Funny enough, Obama held a speech in 2010 where he declared privacy as one of the most important things for every citizen of the world. That doesn’t make any sense at all.

No.

And now he’s returning to global warming, which was one of the major topics in the 2008 election – and has been ignored ever since. It’s like politics are nothing but a scary game.

It is scary. I try not to go too deep with conspiracy stuff, but it gets way scarier. (laughs)





As for MGMT, how come you’re still trying to operate within the realm of pop music or the world of pop music while you’́re becoming more and more extreme. I mean, this album is even more psychedelic than “Congratulations” – which might lead to people considering it even more difficult. How do you deal with that?

See, I think even more weird maybe… even more psychedelic probably. But difficult? For some reason I don’t think it is. I think it’s more open. And even just the kind of spirit of the songs I think is more kind of like, there’s places for you to get in. And I think “Congratulations”, which is very like the tension around the making of it, and the kind of promoting of it was like palpable. Where it felt closed off and shut off and kind of just like withdrawn and kind lurking and looking, and not wanting to interact. And this one’s like forcing people to interact with it. It’s like you said: “Hitting you over the head.” And so even if you listen to it and you’re like: “This is weird and difficult and just extreme and strange.” What our goal was is that, yeah it is, but it’s going to get stuck in your head, and you’re going to be singing it. (chuckles)

So, it’́s not aimed to be fully understood at first listen, but it ́s something that grows on you – as good art should?

I think that can sound a little pretentious or kind of like just the wrong message… It can send the wrong message. Because we never want to say like: “This is meant for these people and not these people” or that kind of thing. It’s meant for anybody and the only reason we would say that would be some sort of almost like warning. But that’s how we got in trouble with the last album, we were trying to like warn people that it was different. And so we really don’t want to do that this time. It’s just it is what it is. (chuckles) And take it how you will. (chuckles)

How do you feel about the response for the last one, which was either adored or hated?

I think unfortunately it was the negative response to hating that was more publicized. I guess that’s pretty standard. But yeah, so we would have that on one side and then we would go and play like our biggest headlining shows in the US, and these shows in Southeast Asia and stuff where people are singing all the lyrics to songs from “Congratulations”. And it’s like we’re seeing this kind of love that’s bigger than it’s been for any songs we’ve had. And it’s not really seen to the naysayer’s. (laughs) But whatever. It’s fine. That’s what we want anyways just the fulfillment of having that connection with our audience. Cause I think that’s the point of it all. (laughs)

What about the label? Doesn ́t Columbia expect or hope for another “Kids”?

I think that they probably would have loved if we would handed them another “Kids” or “Time To Pretend”. And I don’t think Ben and I would have been too upset either. I think we would love to write another song like that. I mean, why not? But it’s not naturally coming out of our brains at the moment. What’s been best about Columbia and being on that label, is that: Despite what maybe people assume or maybe it has been printed, like they’ve just been really let us do whatever we want. And they have Beyoncé and Adele and huge artists that are going to give them the bacon, you know what I mean. They’re going to give them the honey, and we can give them this kind of wilder artistic side that makes their label look diverse and cool, I don’t know. (laughs)

Like being their little art project?

Yeah, we’re their little art project. I’m fine being a little art project. (laughs)

But it came across as if you weren ́t too happy with the last album yourself…

Yeah.

Why was that?

Because we at one point said – in a very like self-deprecating and kind of sarcastic way – before our album was even done, I think there was some like cheeky journalist from the UK who asked us how it was. And we were: “Oh, it’s terrible you don’t want to listen to it.” I’m sure he’s a smart guy and he knew how we were presenting that, and instead it became a headline: “How’s your new album: Terrible” in quotes. So we learned a lot of lessons from that. (laughs)

Where the hell did you find Faine Jade, an obscure late 60s band from New Jersey?

I think Long Island. My friend Frank was working in a record store in San Francisco. And he would always send me mixes and like just the best, most obscure little gems of songs. And he sent me three Faine Jade songs a long time ago. And I’ve always been really into “Introspection” I think is the right combination of kind of frilly, silly psychedelia. And also, just like throwing in “why have all the prophets lied” into a chorus is pretty bold. (laughs) I love it. But we recorded it kind of as an exercise to keep it going in the studio when there’s like a down moment where we weren’t kind of feeling the creative juices flowing. And then – after it was done – we just felt like it fit lyrically with the rest of the album. And fit kind of musically, and it was nice. So, keep it on the album.

“Astro-Mancy” is in the same vain: “Blind and happy for tomorrow…” That’s influenced by a poem, isn’t it? Are you into poetry?

Yeah, I think in the past few years since our last record I’ve really tried to explore especially poetry, and I’ve been able – I guess relatively quickly – to find a couple OF writers and poets that I just have a very, very deep connection with and feel like some of their words are like everything I could hope to write. And I know that that’s rare, so I keep them, and a few writers were a major influence on this new record. And I started buying a lot of books. So, now I got a lot of books to read. (laughs)

And the other worldly aspect, where does that come from?

Well, I don’t think it should be taken as alien in a sense that it’s from outer space or like another planet or another galaxy or something. It’s the sensation that what is taken and known as everyday reality – even if it’s mundane and just things that are accepted as this is what daily life is like and daily reality – can be the most bizarre and kind of uncanny and surreal things that you experience as a human. (chuckles) And so it’s not like escapist in that sense. It’s kind of down to earth and observing, but observing almost from the perspective of an alien. And just laughing in wander at how bizarre humanity can be. (laughs)

According to Wikipedia you recorded a song called “Something To Do With Prince”. Does that really exist?

That’s another straight cut from an improvisation that we decided to use on a B-side with Spectrum, with Sonic Boom. And there was kind of a mess and unfortunate complication with it various reasons, but it is going to come out. But yeah, if you listen to that ever, I think maybe we reversed the whole track for that release. (chuckles) But it’s really just a straight start and stop moment from an improvisation that we thought it would be cool to release. We didn’t add anything to it.

What do you dislike about a person?

I don’t know, I think that’s something that kind of runs through on our new record. Just as a natural result of both of us turning 30 and kind of – for whatever reasons – just being able to kind of take a breath and accept some things. And also kind of just getting to a point where we’ve learned what you like and don’t like. And learn how to recognize it in other people and things. And it sounds really basic and simple, but it’s, it’s pretty important and true, you know.

So you ́re like the family guy now?

Yeah, totally. (laughs)

How come Brian Eno hasn’t responded to you reaching out for him on the last album?

I don’t know. I mean, I read an interview that he liked the song, “Brian Eno”, and he thought the lyrics were kind of clever or funny or something. I think Ben met him. Cause he was at the Guggenheim doing a private tour on the day that we did one of those shows. But he left before I got there. It ́d still be cool to meet him. (laughs)

I hear you want to go into production yourself. Is that true?

Yeah, Ben produced our friend Hank’s band, it’s called Kuroma, and spent a few months kind of working in his home studio. But he’s the producer and it’s the first time I think he’s really done that. But I’d like to do that as well. I just haven’t really found the right band to do it with. But it’s always something that’s been really intriguing. And I want to try it.

Start with Paul McCartney. Obviously you know the man, and he’s a fan.

That’d be cool. That would be a little bit strange dynamic maybe. (laughs)

What’s it like meeting people like that?

That was just such a brief encounter with Paul McCartney. He’s really nice and really friendly, but just kind of wooshed by, you know. It’s like he’s kind of like almost one of the untouchables or something in a way. I could see how it could get to that point. But it was kind of just like we played this show in a baseball stadium with Paul McCartney, and my family was there. It was all very surreal. But we met him and he was nice, and we kept saying that we want to get together and jam. But it never happened. But that would be fun. (chuckles)

May I ask you what odd jobs you had to take in the past – to make ends meet and before music finally paid the bills?

Well, I guess the oddest would be just as a production assistant on the set of this puppet HBO show called “Greg The Bunny” that was on maybe eight years ago or something, seven years ago. I painted like a backdrop for one little puppet scene. Then I made this carpet that was supposed to look like the red room in “Twin Peaks”. And put rhinestones on a skull and all these weird little jobs. That was fun. Production assistant is a really nice way of saying like, “Bitch” I think. Another assistant job was for an AOL Sessions with P. Diddy. And at one point I was like running through Long Island City to go get 9 volt batteries and people were yelling at me over a walkie-talkie. I was just like: “God, this sucks.” (chuckles) But, I’ve been pretty fortunate in my not having to work a terrible office job. Obviously being able to make music for a living, it’s a pretty sweet deal.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on August 18, 2013, 12:33:23 PM
Wow, that was pretty insightful. I would love to hear him talk about his favorite poets and books in more detail.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ac7891 on August 18, 2013, 02:32:22 PM
Wow, that was pretty insightful. I would love to hear him talk about his favorite poets and books in more detail.

i also would! i'm so excited to hear the lyrics on the new album =) great interview!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 18, 2013, 08:08:05 PM
Thanks Voodoo, this is a great interview without the same old questions.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 20, 2013, 07:05:41 PM
Andrew says a few things... (full audio a few posts down)
http://www.montereyherald.com/gomagazine/ci_23903142/monterey-goes-pop (http://www.montereyherald.com/gomagazine/ci_23903142/monterey-goes-pop)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ac7891 on August 20, 2013, 08:40:01 PM
Andrew says a few things...
[url]http://www.montereyherald.com/gomagazine/ci_23903142/monterey-goes-pop[/url] ([url]http://www.montereyherald.com/gomagazine/ci_23903142/monterey-goes-pop[/url])


thanks!! "Originally, we were thinking about that Bob Dylan video from the '60s, where he has a different sign for the words in the song," VanWyngarden said, referencing Dylan's classic "Subterranean Homesick Blues" clip. "Just something that has that sort of kooky, psychedelic feel to it."

lol thats one of my fav videos!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 21, 2013, 07:34:37 PM
Audio interview with Andrew.  Talks about Big Sur, the new setlist, and Hank is permanantly in the band now?!
https://soundcloud.com/marcos-cabrera/interview-mgmts-andrew-van?utm_source=soundcloud
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ac7891 on August 21, 2013, 07:52:41 PM
Audio interview with Andrew.  Talks about Big Sur, the new setlist, and Hank is permanantly in the band now?!
https://soundcloud.com/marcos-cabrera/interview-mgmts-andrew-van?utm_source=soundcloud

grr my speakers suck and i cant hear what he's saying. but Hank!!!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 21, 2013, 07:55:12 PM
Audio interview with Andrew.  Talks about Big Sur, the new setlist, and Hank is permanantly in the band now?!
https://soundcloud.com/marcos-cabrera/interview-mgmts-andrew-van?utm_source=soundcloud

grr my speakers suck and i cant hear what he's saying. but Hank!!!

Yeah it's really hard to hear on my phone or computer.  It's just so muffled.  I'm confused about Hank.  Andrew said they added Hank to play keyboards, sing, etc. right after he mentioned that he, himself plays guitar.  He didn't say they added him in the context of his hurt shoulder so I don't know. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ac7891 on August 21, 2013, 08:19:55 PM
Audio interview with Andrew.  Talks about Big Sur, the new setlist, and Hank is permanantly in the band now?!
https://soundcloud.com/marcos-cabrera/interview-mgmts-andrew-van?utm_source=soundcloud

grr my speakers suck and i cant hear what he's saying. but Hank!!!

Yeah it's really hard to hear on my phone or computer.  It's just so muffled.  I'm confused about Hank.  Andrew said they added Hank to play keyboards, sing, etc. right after he mentioned that he, himself plays guitar.  He didn't say they added him in the context of his hurt shoulder so I don't know.

Hmm well I'm thinking maybe (and i said this on tumblr maybe its you Lol) that since he said Hank was on keyboards maybe that means once he's done healing, Hank will switch from guitar to keyboards. So i guess Andrew would go back to guitar. Which makes me happier in the end. this way everyone wins! I'm thinking that the albums gonna be so layered that they need someone else on keyboards, instead of James constantly doing both keys and guitar! That's so cool Hank's in the group though!! Any chance they might play some glitter penis tracks... hahahah.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 24, 2013, 01:58:18 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/23/mgmt-kids_n_3793003.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/23/mgmt-kids_n_3793003.html)

“I think we’re game to try it again. We’ve worked on a lot of different ways of playing it. We get kind of annoyed by people who say that we played a terrible show because we didn’t play their favorite song. There are a lot of people who feel they have to be very vocal about that — the bro contingent, especially. It’s just silly to go to a concert and let your whole experience hinge on that one small aspect of it. It’s not necessarily because we don’t want to play it, it’s more just we don’t want to play a song live if we can’t make it sound good and fit with the rest of the music. Kids is a more electronic-sounding song than a lot of the other stuff in our set. But now that there are more electronic sounds on the new album, I think we’re going to have to change the way we play everything. I don’t think we’re trying to start a war between the “Kids” fans and the people who don’t care whether we play it or not.”

I'm really glad that they finally addressed this. And that Ben actually called them bros.   
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ac7891 on August 24, 2013, 02:13:47 PM
the bro contingent! amazing. im also glad, although i am fine without kids in the mix.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 26, 2013, 08:12:24 PM
Q Magazine, Issue #326
(http://31.media.tumblr.com/21e6d9f9e655564ae118aa5fc38b06d8/tumblr_ms60is9USe1qdvse6o1_500.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on August 26, 2013, 10:09:32 PM
Irritating synth duo hahaha  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 27, 2013, 02:43:38 PM
Hi.  Me again. 

An interview with Ben http://blaremagazine.com/2013/08/27/interview-mgmt/ (http://blaremagazine.com/2013/08/27/interview-mgmt/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: ac7891 on August 27, 2013, 03:06:04 PM
amazing interview, thank you for sharing!!!

i totally agree with this:
"Things are pretty messed up right now, but it can get better. We just have to be a little more aware of what’s going on right now. That’s something that really annoys me a lot, especially in music or movies coming out. There’s just too much of a demand for art to be a diversion and not enough art that’s about helping people re-enter the world and cope with it."

this is also really exciting:
"I don’t know… I think the music we’ve made really does have the potential to take you somewhere and reward you when you’re listening to it over again. There’s a lot of little things buried in it that you might not get the first time, but it’s really exceptional music that’s not crazy experimental music or hard to get – I mean it has a pretty easy entry point that if you spend some time with it, it’ll take you somewhere."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 28, 2013, 07:06:15 PM
(http://31.media.tumblr.com/49849d223a0aba67a46696c17a49a296/tumblr_ms9msq7xRL1qdvse6o1_500.jpg)
Rolling Stone / September 12, 2013
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on August 28, 2013, 09:36:44 PM
Loved that. This comes to mind: MGMT on the GRAMMY Red Carpet! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIqhG2rI7wg#ws)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: puredaze on August 29, 2013, 07:18:24 PM
I feel like that one is the least awkward of all of them. Their interview with TV Guide was terrible because the interviewers didn't have the slightest clue as to who they were and the dude told Ben he looked like his Grandma's couch.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 30, 2013, 07:53:45 AM
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/fd12a408186c5703ea57981276135c52/tumblr_msfc3kBRAC1qdvse6o1_500.jpg)
Intro / August, 2013 http://www.intro.de/kuenstler/interviews/23072490/mgmt-kinder-mit-verstellten-stimmen (http://www.intro.de/kuenstler/interviews/23072490/mgmt-kinder-mit-verstellten-stimmen)
The google translation is hilarious at points. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on August 31, 2013, 08:58:06 PM
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/6074a15313099e5109f5d9e93cd4a1a5/tumblr_msfcw9mN891qdvse6o1_500.jpg)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/18a8f88275a6049b00d2017cee5b1e67/tumblr_msfcw9mN891qdvse6o2_500.jpg)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/ec4f5d3de5bc6b55e15747308b8b2364/tumblr_msfcw9mN891qdvse6o3_500.jpg)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/6248632cd5f77407c65006288d80b8a7/tumblr_msfbylfV081qzhuoho1_500.jpg)

The Fly / September, 2013 http://issuu.com/theflymagazine/docs/the_fly_september_2013 (http://issuu.com/theflymagazine/docs/the_fly_september_2013)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Voodoo on September 10, 2013, 04:57:17 AM
MGMT did an interview for the Sun (I think the date is 6 Sep) but it keeps asking me to register to be able to see it, and I´m not doing that, so if anyone else is willing....
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 10, 2013, 09:07:23 AM
MGMT frontman suggests David Guetta approached band over collaboration MGMT Tickets
Band discuss their mixed feelings on modern pop music


Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT has hinted that David Guetta approached the band with a view to recording a collaboration with them.

The band started their career with two hit singles – 'Kids' and 'Time To Pretend' before exploring more psychedelic directions on their second and third albums.

Speaking to Digital Spy about the current state of the charts, VanWyngarden explained that he hates Guetta's song 'Titanium' because it is so catchy. "What's that huge song – I don't actually like it cos I get so furious when it gets stuck in my head," he said. "'I am titanium' [by David Guetta] It drills into your brain!" He adds: "I think [Guetta] actually has maybe approached us."

VanWyngarden's bandmate Ben Goldwasser was similarly dismissive of pop music, specifically the lyrical content in the songs. "The production a lot of the time is really cool and impressive," Goldwasser said. "But it's hard for me to identify with a lot of the lyrics. So much of it seems to be about completely forgetting any sort of responsibility and having fun. It's nice that people have that music to turn off the world to, but it doesn't have the kind of staying power that I crave."

Earlier this month MGMT admitted that their new album features music which they "don't even know if it's music we would want to listen to". They also said they were troubled by some of the artists they met after signing a major label record deal in 2006.

"So many musicians have this really commercial sensibility about everything," Ben Goldwasser said. "That made me really disgusted. Looking at music as a product, talking about what we were doing like a brand? We had never thought about music that way."

In August, MGMT revealed the surreal video for their new single 'Your Life Is A Lie', which is taken from the album. In the video the band are joined by a number of different characters including a choir of skeletons, Happy Days actor Henry Winkler and a crying pebble.
Read more at http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/72569#8irvpHdBVlMZ0ZTH.99 (http://www.nme.com/news/mgmt/72569#8irvpHdBVlMZ0ZTH.99)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 10, 2013, 09:24:54 AM
MGMT did an interview for the Sun (I think the date is 6 Sep) but it keeps asking me to register to be able to see it, and I´m not doing that, so if anyone else is willing....
I saw that too, and I was like pffff .... no.

Thanks lala, I love when someone else posts in here haha.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 10, 2013, 11:27:48 AM
Haha we need you. You know I'm not a "Googler."  Everything I post is sent to me, so sometimes it's old news. I appreciate you helping keep the forum organized!  Now if we could just get some fodder for the Glacial Ways thread...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 10, 2013, 11:31:05 AM


I'd definitely take that "quote" with a grain of three of salt. NME is notorious for twisting Andrew's words or using something that he clearly said as a joke.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 10, 2013, 12:30:30 PM
Haha we need you. You know I'm not a "Googler."  Everything I post is sent to me, so sometimes it's old news. I appreciate you helping keep the forum organized!  Now if we could just get some fodder for the Glacial Ways thread...
Thanks. I like contributing to this thread. I actually have more interviews but I felt like I was double posting all up in this thread and not sure if people were even reading it.

I'll post the digital spy interview that nme summarized when I come across it unless someone else finds it first.

Yes Glacial Ways needs some action!
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 10, 2013, 08:12:19 PM
(http://25.media.tumblr.com/2304b08ee80dc3fd2f056eb26ac4577e/tumblr_msujv58gHO1qzhuoho1_500.png)
(http://24.media.tumblr.com/c315e9dea2c27cf13032d4a18b9f61a3/tumblr_msujv58gHO1qzhuoho2_500.png)
http://www.thisisfakediy.co.uk/articles/features/mgmt-its-more-about-feeling-like-an-alien/ (http://www.thisisfakediy.co.uk/articles/features/mgmt-its-more-about-feeling-like-an-alien/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 10, 2013, 10:40:44 PM
Ok I'm saying it now, I'm going to have to keep double posting in here to keep things organized and up to date.  Anyway, here's another...

Interview with Ben for Faster Louder  http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end (http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end)

The quote about not touring as hard as they have in the future scares me.  I get it, but I don't like it :'(
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 11, 2013, 07:05:27 AM
http://pitchfork.com/features/cover-story/reader/mgmt/ (http://pitchfork.com/features/cover-story/reader/mgmt/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 11, 2013, 07:58:28 AM
Ok I'm saying it now, I'm going to have to keep double posting in here to keep things organized and up to date.  Anyway, here's another...

Interview with Ben for Faster Louder  [url]http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end[/url] ([url]http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end[/url])

The quote about not touring as hard as they have in the future scares me.  I get it, but I don't like it :'(


At various points in your career, you guys have sounded quite non-committal about MGMT as a band, and your lives in music. Now that you’ve transitioned out of that intense hype phase, do you think of the band as a long-term proposition now?
Yeah, we do. We’d all like to settle down at some point. We don’t want to tour as hard as we have been for the rest of our lives.

I think he's talking about the fact that they desire to have families in the future and not spend the rest of their lives doing world tours.  I don't think it indicates that there won't be a full scale tour this time around.  I could see them potentially not doing as extended of a world tour....it seems like they hit every nook and cranny of the globe with the last tour....except for Louisville.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 11, 2013, 09:24:51 AM
Ok I'm saying it now, I'm going to have to keep double posting in here to keep things organized and up to date.  Anyway, here's another...

Interview with Ben for Faster Louder  [url]http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end[/url] ([url]http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end[/url])

The quote about not touring as hard as they have in the future scares me.  I get it, but I don't like it :'(


At various points in your career, you guys have sounded quite non-committal about MGMT as a band, and your lives in music. Now that you’ve transitioned out of that intense hype phase, do you think of the band as a long-term proposition now?
Yeah, we do. We’d all like to settle down at some point. We don’t want to tour as hard as we have been for the rest of our lives.

I think he's talking about the fact that they desire to have families in the future and not spend the rest of their lives doing world tours.  I don't think it indicates that there won't be a full scale tour this time around.  I could see them potentially not doing as extended of a world tour....it seems like they hit every nook and cranny of the globe with the last tour....except for Louisville.

That's how I understood it too, but I still don't like it!!!  Again, I get it.  But I'm a selfish MGMT fan. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 11, 2013, 09:34:01 AM
Ok I'm saying it now, I'm going to have to keep double posting in here to keep things organized and up to date.  Anyway, here's another...

Interview with Ben for Faster Louder  [url]http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end[/url] ([url]http://m.fasterlouder.com.au/features/36885/MGMT-People-thought-wed-gone-off-the-deep-end[/url])

The quote about not touring as hard as they have in the future scares me.  I get it, but I don't like it :'(


At various points in your career, you guys have sounded quite non-committal about MGMT as a band, and your lives in music. Now that you’ve transitioned out of that intense hype phase, do you think of the band as a long-term proposition now?
Yeah, we do. We’d all like to settle down at some point. We don’t want to tour as hard as we have been for the rest of our lives.

I think he's talking about the fact that they desire to have families in the future and not spend the rest of their lives doing world tours.  I don't think it indicates that there won't be a full scale tour this time around.  I could see them potentially not doing as extended of a world tour....it seems like they hit every nook and cranny of the globe with the last tour....except for Louisville.

That's how I understood it too, but I still don't like it!!!  Again, I get it.  But I'm a selfish MGMT fan.


I'm willing to let them go to an extent at the thought of a little Beno running around  :)
It makes me happy to think of them as happy and settled.  They've worked so damn hard.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 11, 2013, 09:34:53 AM
Lol, both James parts from the pitchfork article crack me up.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2013, 05:43:24 AM
I like it when a critic "gets them."  I think he uses the word "difficult" in this review to mean that it's daunting to make a second or third album after great success with your first.

http://www.musicomh.com/reviews/albums/mgmt-mgmt (http://www.musicomh.com/reviews/albums/mgmt-mgmt)

With 2010’s Congratulations, MGMT managed to avoid the question of the difficult second album by creating a record that deliberately placed more demands on the listener than their 2007 debut Oracular Spectacular.  Gone were the big radio friendly tunes: nothing could be equated with Time To Pretend or Kids in this album of a more intensely psychedelic persuasion. It was, in a way, a means of saying ‘screw you’ to anyone who had MGMT pigeonholed as a singles band; it was a means of displaying their intent and their ambition.

When it comes to their new self-titled album, however, they find themselves in the lesser-known position of the difficult third album. Should they stick with the deep psych, or should they try for a couple more hit singles?

Fans of the band – not merely of their recognisable hits – will be pleased to learn that MGMT have chosen the former option. This is, of course, what they’re good at.  Listen to Oracular Spectacular again, skipping Time To Pretend and Kids, and it becomes more noticeable that this is pretty much what they have been doing all along. So what we have here is the result of a steady process of evolution.

The album begins confidently, front-loaded with its more accessible tracks.  Opener Alien Days recalls the Flaming Lips and early David Bowie with its crisply strummed guitar and steady drumming, while Cool Song No 2 retains the same mood, only here it’s driven along by piano rather than guitar.

Introspection is a cover of a semi-obscure 1968 psych track by Faine Jade, and this seems a statement of intent in itself; it’s an assertion that MGMT know their genre well and want to follow in the footsteps of their chosen luminaries. (Incidentally, Faine Jade’s website is well worth checking out, if only to marvel at how the guy clearly hasn’t got over the psychedelic excesses of the late ’60s; it’s a glorious hangover from the Geocities era internet, with animated lava lamps embedded in the background and sprinklings of Comic Sans.) Their version of the song sticks fairly closely to the original, though it’s shrouded in the same fuzziness that clothes the entire album, and introduces woozy tremolo-like sounds during the chorus.

The album’s second side is more playful and meandering. A Good Sadness could be compared with any number of contemporary indie-pop tracks, with big beats and basslines underpinning distant and faintly ethereal vocals, but from there on the music is more distinctive and interesting. Astro-Mancy is gently trance-like, while I Love You Too, Death is more downbeat and introspective, building from heady vibrations and flutes to more steady guitar strumming.

Plenty of Girls in the Sea is a curious interlude that sounds a bit like a lost The Magnetic Fields song that was rejected by Stephin Merritt because too many weird noises mysteriously found their way onto the recording, and then closing song An Orphan Of Fortune takes us deeper into the territory of unchaperoned psychedelic wandering. Like I Love You Too, Death, it begins slowly and dimly, but, rather than building up, it bursts into life when both drums and vocals crash into the track, and soon settles into a groove.

In the same way, MGMT seem to have settled into their groove here, or more correctly their two concurrent grooves. On one hand, they seem able to produce easily digestible fuzzy pop songs slightly reminiscent of soft rock with what appears to be consummate ease; on the other, they can enter into all manner of sonic digressions with a noteworthy lightness of touch. The question that will face them when it comes to their difficult fourth album will be of how they should go about reconciling these two sides, or whether they should do so at all.


Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2013, 05:50:58 AM
http://www.itsallindie.com/2013/09/album-review-mgmt-mgmt.html (http://www.itsallindie.com/2013/09/album-review-mgmt-mgmt.html)

Album Review... MGMT - MGMT
Describing MGMT's new self-titled album as a psychedelic masterpiece would be fitting. But two words cannot even start to describe this complex and trippy album. The songs on the album really giving the impression that a wave runs through each song connecting it to the next, makes it easy to forget where one song starts and the next ends since the colourful wave runs on.

Combining quiet, thoughtful songs such as "I Love You Too, Death" with happy, powerful songs like "Alien Days" and even a song sounding like a spaceship taking off ("A Good Sadness") makes listening to the album a voyage through different spheres of MGMT's sound.



The song "Plenty Of Girls In The Sea" will no doubt be a big sing-along during the chorus at the US band's live shows. This may also be down to this song sounding like what I imagine the Beatles would have sounded like had they been tripping out on acid with modern technology around them.
Although with many different layers to discover and each listening experience providing new elements to each piece, the album lacks the sort of song that sticks in one's mind and opens up the treasure that is MGMT's music to listeners from other genres. This obviously isn't bad, but shows that MGMT have moved on from electro-pop hits from their first album "Oracular Spectacular". The new album also sounds a lot securer than their second album "Congratulations", with the band stating that they felt more at ease when recording the new album.

This album isn't in any way about individual songs, though. You get the feeling that with "Oracular Spectacular" you could just pull out your iPod and press play for any song. This album requires you to get your record player and listen to the album from start to finish - just as Andrew and Benjamin would have wanted you to. In hindsight "psychedelic masterpiece" is probably an understatement.

Written by - Benjamin Brown
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2013, 06:47:14 AM
The only reasons that I'm even bothering to post this review are a) Stereogum is a somewhat legitimate mag and b) the fucktard "critic" actually admits he was totally wrong about Congratulations.  Dumbass waste of air.

http://www.stereogum.com/1470691/premature-evaluation-mgmt-mgmt/franchises/premature-evaluation/ (http://www.stereogum.com/1470691/premature-evaluation-mgmt-mgmt/franchises/premature-evaluation/)

"I remember Congratulations as a difficult record, but returning to it today, I’m struck by how melodic and approachable those songs are. The likes of “Flash Delirium” and “It’s Working” aren’t streamlined radio-killers, but they’re jammed with more hooks than they know what to do with, and they brim with energy as they zoom along. Removed from the context of such breathless expectation, the album is actually pretty fun — a biplane joyride with its head in the clouds, capped off by “Congratulations,” a lovely parachute drift back to solid ground. It’s completely dispensable, but it has its charms."

This dipshit shouldn't be allowed to approach an on ramp, much less write about music.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2013, 08:44:50 AM
So this pissed me off to no end.  I wasn't going to post it, but since I wrote to the writer, I thought I'd post the article along with my email response.  This guy made up an article after reading a blurb in the Pitchfork article.  The italics are quotes from Pitchfork.

MGMT Is Too Cool to Play Hit Song Live

ZACH SCHONFELD SEP 11, 2013

Towards the beginning of Pitchfork's rather whimsically designed new cover story on MGMT, associate editor Larry Fitzmaurice uncovers a fact that devotees of the psych-pop duo already know: the band is no longer playing "Kids" live.

You know, "Kids"? The once-inescapable earworm of a synth-pop anthem that made the band stars in 2008 and landed dozens of TV spots and invented that ascending keyboard riff heard around the world? They're over it. Done.

It seems the band's "underaged" fans aren't so thrilled about this betrayal, Fitzmaurice learned at a tour date in Lewiston, New York:

For this tour, they've notably stricken their biggest hit to date, Oracular's platinum-selling "Kids", from the setlist—a move that one underaged concertgoer tells me she's "very upset about," before asking if I could buy her some beers. She's not alone. As I speak to others in the audience, it becomes clear what they're here to hear, and it's not the new stuff.

A tale as old as time, or at least the electric guitar: Area Fan Just Wants to Hear the Hits. And this band, which is about to release the most jarringly anti-commercial album of its career, isn't in the mood to play them:

The band is aware of these expectations, nearly to a fault. "There are still people who secretly hope that we’re going to come out with an album of songs that sound like 'Kids,'" laments Goldwasser, in a tone that suggests the past isn't worth revisiting.

This, too, is an old story: the members of MGMT, ever shackled by the expectations a hit debut has wrought, have begun to resent the song (or songs) that brought them success in the first place.

But in recent months, Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden have made a hobby out of bragging about just how avant-garde their new stuff is going to be. In January, the two bragged to Rolling Stone that they were "not trying to make music that everyone understands the first time they hear it"; more recently, they talked to NME about the new album, saying "we don't even know if it's music we would want to listen to." ("So many musicians have this really commercial sensibility about everything," Goldwasser goes on. "That made me really disgusted.")

And not playing the big hit live? That's the ultimate betrayal—and an entirely familiar statement of Being a Serious Artist. The most famous example, perhaps, is that of Radiohead's 1993 self-loathing smash "Creep." At the time, pretty much everyone thought the goofy-haired rockers would go down as a one-hit-wonder:



Instead, they took over the world—and refused to play "Creep" live for years after OK Computer. Which makes sense, really, given that it's an astonishingly cheesy song compared to pretty much everything that came after, but the degree of the band's avoidance was notable. Radiohead finally gave it an impromptu rendition at a gig in Oxford in 2001, but these days they're back to avoiding it at all costs.

Robert Plant had a similarly tortured relationship with "Stairway to Heaven," once declaring that he'd "break out in hives if he had to sing [the song] at every show." And Kurt Cobain famously resented the hell out of "Smells Like Teen Spirit"; towards the end of his life he left it off setlists, and when he did play it, Cracked notes, he would "sometimes lead into it with "More Than a Feeling" just to tell everyone exactly how much of his ass they could kiss." (Cobain, though, didn't quite live long enough to avoid it for a substantial amount of time.)

And MGMT? As the Radiohead case shows, their decision makes sense if the new music is so radical and compelling as to render "Kids" virtually irrelevant. But having just gotten to hear the album, it's tough to tell if that's the case.

As MGMT has already said, it's not "music that everyone understands the first time they hear it." Let's see about the ninth or 10th time.

Update: A sleuthy reader notes that after dropping the song from their setlist in the spring and early summer, the band seems to have begun performing it again in recent weeks, according to setlist.fm. Guess we'll see if that lasts.

MY EMAIL:

MGMT will play Kids when they feel it fits the setlist.  They dropped it because it has been a karaoke piece for them and they feel stupid performing it.  They brought it back to the setlist at FYF fest, playing it live with instruments.  They aren't trying to make some sort of hipster statement by not playing it, they simply have grown as artists and this song, that they wrote when they were nineteen, just isn't something that fits with what they're playing now-in their opinion.  That being said, they are certainly well aware of the whole idea of giving the customer what they want.  This summer, their shows have been plagued by douchey bros chanting Kids over the music who honestly make it miserable for the rest of us who are there for their music, and not the glow stick party. 

You didn't do your research.  You reacted to the Pitchfork article and you come off as a jackass.  If you aren't willing to put in five minutes of research as to why the band doesn't want to play Kids, then you have no business writing about it.  You pulled something out of an article and made an assumption that you presented as fact in the title of your article. 

Awesome journalism. 


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/23/mgmt-kids_n_3793003.html?just_reloaded=1 (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/23/mgmt-kids_n_3793003.html?just_reloaded=1)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: gulsah on September 12, 2013, 09:39:48 AM
Thank you for doing it in the classiest way possible.
What an asshole.
(WAIT AND FYF WAS THE FIRST SHOW? THEN IM GLAD I POOPED MY PANTS THAT NIGHT OVER IT AND TOTALLY NOT EMBARRASSED LOL)
I don't understand why everyone WANTS to hate them. In your e-mail you said it the best... he didn't research and just reacted to another article. HOWEVER, he had the nerve to react. Well, we all know what his favorite song is. How can you be that appalled by an article that you have to write your own LOL. "UGH, NO LONGER PLAYING KIDS? YOU ASSHOLES! THAT WAS MY FAVORITE SONG! FUCK YOU, MGMT!"
Instead of writing it like a youtube comment he decided to sound smarter and just put it in to article form.


Also Kids sounds fucking awesome back, better than ever. I hope they go in and out playing it because I just want people like Zach to be eliminated. Again like you said -- they can play Kids when they want to play Kids. Why is it ok for all those other bands to do the things they did and not MGMT?  ::)

EDIT; I JUST read the pitchfork article and I love it so so so so much. Felt like I was there with them. The writer is amazing.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2013, 01:44:58 PM

Sections
Album Reviews
All Reviews
MGMT - MGMT
This is solipsism at its worst...
CLASHMUSIC / REVIEWS / 12 · 09 · 2013 0
 

Those upset that MGMT’s second album, ‘Congratulations’, wasn’t simply ‘Oracular Spectacular’ mark II will be further upset by the Connecticut-formed band’s third outing.

Eschewing sunshine melodies, MGMT here sink further into self-indulgent, amateurish psych-rock, constantly veering from wan and pallid to a heavy, soupy mess over the course of the album’s 10 tracks.

This kind of psychedelia may be currently in vogue thanks to acts such as Tame Impala, but MGMT make such a hash of things that it’s difficult to see anyone being blown away by this album.

Of course groups should look to change and evolve, but this is solipsism at its worst.

3/10

Words: Joe Rivers

I'D LIKE TO BLOW YOU AWAY YOU MORONIC, SHIT BAG, FUCKTARD CUNT FLAP.  WHY DO PEOPLE LIKE THIS THINK THEY KNOW ANYFUCKINGTHING ABOUT MUSIC?!?!?!?  GO FUCK YOURSELF, ASSWIPE!!!!

(http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lohuuaFMAQ1qgirhjo1_500.gif)(http://31.media.tumblr.com/076b38482ab0d2e30b5b82c1ee13228a/tumblr_mlplhaCdwu1qepf8yo2_r1_500.gif)

How was that for keeping it classy?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fetusfryer on September 12, 2013, 07:06:37 PM
I can't believe MGMT's been holding back on us with this Credence Clear Water Revival/Temple of the Dog sounding music. If it was written back during the Kids time, I bet if they spruced it up a bit and released it,  it would shut a lot of angry fans up.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 12, 2013, 08:03:39 PM
(http://www.undertheradarmag.com/uploads/article_images/UndertheRadar_MGMT_Issue47_MedRes.jpg)
http://www.undertheradarmag.com/news/under_the_radars_september_issue_featuring_mgmt_on_the_cover_is_on_newsstan/ (http://www.undertheradarmag.com/news/under_the_radars_september_issue_featuring_mgmt_on_the_cover_is_on_newsstan/)
The issue includes an in-depth 9-page cover story article on MGMT, written by Matt Fink and photographed by Ray Lego. In the article, band members Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser discuss breaking down the rock star mythology, surviving backlash, and the recording of their self-titled third album.

“At some point in college we would joke about this big fantasy of getting as popular as possible and then destroying it in this bombastic and crazy fashion. Even if it was a joke, that little seed of a fantasy, some people would pick up on that and see us putting out an album like Congratulations as fulfilling that kind of prophecy.” – Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT

“I think it was kind of surprising to us that a lot of people didn’t get the joke. ‘Time to Pretend,’ which is definitely a not a song that’s advising people to forget about the world and party all the time, became known for that.” – Ben Goldwasser of MGMT

The digital issue also includes extended Q&As with artists interviewed in the print edition, quotes that didn’t make it into the print version. Included are bonus Q&As with Arctic Monkeys, Neko Case, and MGMT.

“I have a bad habit of picking up books about drugs, but that’s better than having a drug habit, I think.” – Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT

“I think it would be really cool to have another hit single. That’s really exciting. But that’s not really the main goal for me.” – Ben Goldwasser of MGMT

“I still get people who come in and say, ‘Make it sound like MGMT’ and I’ll start distorting stuff, and they’ll say ‘What are you doing?’ Well, did you listen to the record?” – MGMT producer Dave Fridmann
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 13, 2013, 07:41:27 AM
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/entertainment/a/-/entertainment/18910718/for-mgmt-its-personal/ (http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/entertainment/a/-/entertainment/18910718/for-mgmt-its-personal/)

MGMT are less into pleasing others than they are about pushing musical boundaries. And the New York-based duo have stuck to their guns on album number three.

After the ripper 2008 debut Oracular Spectacular was followed by the far less accessible Congratulations, many have yearned for a return to perfect slices of generation-defining pop such as Kids, Electric Feel and Time to Pretend.

But in making the self-titled third LP, lead vocalist Andrew VanWyngarden says they felt no pressure to repeat commercially successful formulas from the past and made zero compromises.

“Really it wasn’t in our heads how people were going to react or we had to make something this way because of the last album, as much as people really want that to be the case,” he says, speaking on the phone from Salt Lake City, Utah, where he and co-founder Ben Goldwasser are on tour.

Perhaps the three very different musical chapters — from the brightly coloured debut, to the frenetic psych-rock of 2010’s Congratulations, to their most recent effort, released today — is best summed up by imagining each LP as a person.

“The first album, it’s kind of a portrait of a post-collegiate kid who is maybe a little bit paranoid. It’s definitely a dreamer,” VanWyngarden says as he reflects on the pressures the naive young band felt after signing to major label Columbia Records in 2006.

“The second one is definitely some older dude from England who wears a lot of darker clothes and maybe was in a successful band in the late 70s and maybe had a slight note of bitterness, (was) a little bit disillusioned or jaded or melancholy,” he says of Congratulations, a reaction to their epic rise in popularity.

“If you want a person for the new one, I don’t know. I think it’s just us right now.”

The 30-year-old says this time around he and Goldwasser returned to the looser, freeform methods they favoured in their early student days after forming in 2001 at Wesleyan University, a liberal arts college in Connecticut.

Returning for a third time to a studio in a small town in New York state to record with long-time producer Dave Fridmann, VanWyngarden likens the relaxed process to automatic writing or “something that was just happening on its own”.

The duo improvised and captured the moments, resulting in a diverse collection of 10 songs.

“Building up improvisations and making funky, weird noises just for fun with no pressure — it was nice,” he says. “It was a pretty natural process. We figured out what made us happiest while writing and what felt the most natural at the time and started to make songs out of it that way.

“There wasn’t that feeling of anxiety or anguish that was probably more present when we were making the last album. We were generally able to go with the flow more on this album . . . it’s a little bit more loose and carefree.”

The first taste of the eponymous third album came in April with the surreal, extraterrestrial-themed single Alien Days. Opening with the innocent voice of a nine-year-old boy called Trevor — the son of a record store owner they knew — and culminating in tearing space rock, the track was widely hailed an instant MGMT classic.

“Something that we’ve always wanted to encourage when we write was the feeling of music coming from an alien dimension or coming from somewhere else,” VanWyngarden says.

“It’s dorky but it’s something that we’ve always bonded over.”

This immersive and other-worldly quality is amplified by MGMT’s flashy visual style. For this album they assembled visual elements to accompany and illuminate the new music. Dubbed The Optimizer and produced by MGMT’s live show video instrumentalist, Alejandro Crawford, listeners are provided with video and CGI work by a range of artists as they listen to the album.

According to VanWyngarden, it’s all designed to take listeners on a wild ride. They’ve even released a quirky cinematic trailer for the new album, which features what appears to be the beginnings of an alien invasion.

“We’re trying to make something that has these worlds we want people to get into,” he says. “We love pushing envelopes. I mean, we’ve got a lot of envelopes pushing around all the time.”
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 13, 2013, 01:40:11 PM
I did actually cringe when I first read Andrew's quote because I know that the idiots were going to take it out of context and run with it.

MGMT

(Columbia)

HHHII

Andrew VanWyngarden – one half of MGMT – offered an intriguing insight into his band's world view in an interview earlier this week: "We had this running joke between us that we wanted to get as hugely popular as possible and then really bombastically destroy it all."

The pair were as good as their word. After delivering two of the biggest, best loved songs of 2008 – the magnificent electro-pop tunes, Time to Pretend and Kids – they set about alienating as many fans as possible with a turgid second album, Congratulations, that was short on inspiration and long on self-indulgence.

Those hoping that this third album would see VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser return to the big crowd-pleasing anthems will be sorely disappointed. It is not an album that has nailed its colours to the commercial mast – and when one considers that the duo are capable of delivering superb, mass appeal pop, that is a great pity.

But those who abandoned the band after the giddy highs of that debut, Oracular Spectacular, would be doing themselves a disservice by dismissing the boundary-pushing electronica and psychedelic rock on this album too.

(Let them not forget that their debut boasted several tracks that were acquired listens.)

Unlike the messy second album, VanWyngarden and Goldwasser have discovered how to make experimental music that isn't mired by naval gazing – despite the former's playful comment to Rolling Stone that he didn't "even know if it's music we would want to listen to".

Current single Your Life is a Lie is a case in point – its fidgety arrangement and comparatively odd structure may not be immediately arresting, but it's a track that gets better the more it's played.

And Alien Days manages to be utterly charming despite its pretensions.

Key tracks: Your Life is a Lie; Alien Days

Irish Independent
- See more at: http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/music/mgmt-return-solid-but-not-spectacular-29575781.html#sthash.XEnOEPyb.dpuf (http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/music/mgmt-return-solid-but-not-spectacular-29575781.html#sthash.XEnOEPyb.dpuf)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 13, 2013, 01:42:08 PM
I think the same person wrote the review for The Independent UK

MGMT's eponymous album offers few hostages to pleasure. From the opening “Alien Days”, this is a sequence of plodding, miasmic psych-rockers laced with woozy, de-tuned synths, random effects and murmured vocals – dead, dry singing for dispassionate, uninvolving music. Only the cover of “Introspection” by late-1960s psychedelic obscurity Faine Jade and novelty jollity “Plenty Of Girls In The Sea” hold any charm. Elsewhere, it's just a bunch of melody-averse tracks. Another dilettante excursion with little to recommend it.

Download: Introspection; Plenty Of Girls In The Sea
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on September 13, 2013, 08:26:00 PM
I did actually cringe when I first read Andrew's quote because I know that the idiots were going to take it out of context and run with it.

MGMT

(Columbia)

HHHII

Andrew VanWyngarden – one half of MGMT – offered an intriguing insight into his band's world view in an interview earlier this week: "We had this running joke between us that we wanted to get as hugely popular as possible and then really bombastically destroy it all."

The pair were as good as their word. After delivering two of the biggest, best loved songs of 2008 – the magnificent electro-pop tunes, Time to Pretend and Kids – they set about alienating as many fans as possible with a turgid second album, Congratulations, that was short on inspiration and long on self-indulgence.

Those hoping that this third album would see VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser return to the big crowd-pleasing anthems will be sorely disappointed. It is not an album that has nailed its colours to the commercial mast – and when one considers that the duo are capable of delivering superb, mass appeal pop, that is a great pity.

But those who abandoned the band after the giddy highs of that debut, Oracular Spectacular, would be doing themselves a disservice by dismissing the boundary-pushing electronica and psychedelic rock on this album too.

(Let them not forget that their debut boasted several tracks that were acquired listens.)

Unlike the messy second album, VanWyngarden and Goldwasser have discovered how to make experimental music that isn't mired by naval gazing – despite the former's playful comment to Rolling Stone that he didn't "even know if it's music we would want to listen to".

Current single Your Life is a Lie is a case in point – its fidgety arrangement and comparatively odd structure may not be immediately arresting, but it's a track that gets better the more it's played.

And Alien Days manages to be utterly charming despite its pretensions.

Key tracks: Your Life is a Lie; Alien Days

Irish Independent
- See more at: [url]http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/music/mgmt-return-solid-but-not-spectacular-29575781.html#sthash.XEnOEPyb.dpuf[/url] ([url]http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/music/mgmt-return-solid-but-not-spectacular-29575781.html#sthash.XEnOEPyb.dpuf[/url])


Im seriously just appalled by this whole "review"
(http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh61/lilsarabear04/Gifs/tumblr_m1nq97YOY81r5sqht.gif)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 13, 2013, 09:48:45 PM
I hate this thread rn.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 14, 2013, 05:46:49 AM
I hate this thread rn.

THIS UGH
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on September 14, 2013, 05:51:36 PM
(http://31.media.tumblr.com/c4820f7053da4e51b142513f51e9989c/tumblr_mt37ug1ODW1s7tdqzo1_400.gif)
if I was a dog...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 14, 2013, 10:27:51 PM
MGMT thumb their noses at mainstream fame with new album

MGMT's third album features melodies reminiscent of early Pink Floyd.
Photo: Danny Clinch
At the 2010 Grammys, MGMT was the hottest new band on the block. With a million sales of their 2007 debut album, “Oracular Spectacular,” a dance-pop single called “Kids” and a Grammy win, the New Yorkers could have used the ceremony to signal their arrival as mainstream pop stars. But when they rolled up on the pre-show carpet, it was clear they had other plans.
Decked out in wildly patterned suits, MGMT founders Andrew Van- Wyngarden and Ben Goldwasser gave a truly surreal interview with VJ Steven Smith. After trying to engage the band with pseudo-music talk to little avail, Smith gave up after two minutes, wearily complimenting their suits as a parting shot.
“Good tailor, by the way,” he said.
“Thanks,” replied a deadpan Van- Wyngarden. “His name is Swift.”
It was the kind of wonderfully uncomfortable moment music fans pray for during the Grammys. The off-the-cuff joke about the powers of pop princess Taylor Swift helped MGMT realize they may not be cut out for the Top 40 throne. “I don’t think our dry sarcasm and pranky style come across well in interviews,” VanWyngarden tells The Post.
Perhaps if they’d played nice during tedious TV chats and written another version or two of “Kids,” Van- Wyngarden and Goldwasser would have gone on to be as big as Swift herself. Instead, the Brooklyn bandmates have distinguished themselves by delving deep into the world of psychedelic rock: first with 2010’s head-expanding “Congratulations,” and now with a new, eponymous album, out Tuesday.
This musical departure has lost them plenty of fans; cynics often cite MGMT as a band that’s committed career suicide. But VanWyngarden doesn’t understand all the shade.
“We’ve been playing live since 2007 as essentially a psychedelic rock band, but people [heard our music on the radio and] came to our shows expecting Daft Punk!” he says.
“MGMT” was recorded in relative isolation in upstate New York. The immersive album is bathed in trippy noise and chaos, but delicate melodies hide below the surface, reminiscent of early Pink Floyd. The songs were mostly culled from hours-long jam sessions and improvisations between the bandmates.
“Sometimes we didn’t even know who was making what sounds,” laughs VanWyngarden. “It could be hit and miss, obviously, but when it clicked, it was like the sounds were coming from another dimension.”
Musically, the album is a world away from earlier MGMT hits, but the band’s subversive sense of humor remains intact. This summer, they performed the lead single “Your Life Is a Lie” on the “Late Show with David Letterman,” employing a comically oversized cowbell decorated with the words “Be Aware,” which VanWyngarden pounded with a giant drumstick. The bizarre performance became a viral hit. And on Wednesday, they turned up at “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” to play the track “Plenty Of Girls In The Sea” wearing film scuba gear and sitting around a goldfish bowl.
As Goldwasser says, the band wouldn’t trade the freedom to engage in that kind of mischief for another mainstream stint on the red carpet: “There’s not a whole lot of subtlety in that world. It’s all about surface appearances. We’re more about inside jokes and doing things that might take a little while to appreciate.”


 NY Post
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 15, 2013, 03:45:27 AM
I like that article, not too shabby.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 15, 2013, 06:33:27 PM
Good, good.  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 16, 2013, 08:17:36 AM
(http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Mgmt_Electronic_Beats-700x452.jpg)
“Everything is not OK”: An interview with MGMT
In the cover story from our new Fall 2013 issue of Electronic Beats Magazine, A.J. Samuels finds out if psych-songsmiths MGMT have burned the bridge back to sanity—and pop—by entering a world of darkness and electronics with their third, self-titled LP. All photos by Miguel Villalobos. Above  left to right: Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser

In the cover story from our new Fall 2013 issue of Electronic Beats Magazine, A.J. Samuels finds out if psych-songsmiths MGMT have burned the bridge back to sanity—and pop—by entering a world of darkness and electronics with their third, self-titled LP. All photos by Miguel Villalobos. Above  left to right: Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser  - See more at: http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/features/interviews/everything-is-not-ok-an-interview-with-mgmt/#sthash.C5YJgkq4.dpuf (http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/features/interviews/everything-is-not-ok-an-interview-with-mgmt/#sthash.C5YJgkq4.dpuf)
(http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Mgmt_Andrew_VanWyngarden_Electronic_Beats.jpg)

The crowd at the show was incredibly young. What do you think of the youthfulness of your audience?

AVW: We get handwritten notes and fan art, and it’s very clear that people have gone as deep into it as one could go and found their own meaning in it, and that’s really satisfying for us—especially when it’s teenagers and young kids in high school going through whatever they’re going through. I did that a lot with bands in high school—Talking Heads was one, The Grateful Dead . . . I actually never got to see a Dead show, but they played in ’94 in Memphis where I grew up, which was a year before Jerry died. I was only eleven, but I had gotten into them because of my sister. I was also very into Phish in high school, and what was cool about that was finding a lot of music and other bands in listening to them and their covers. I actually got into the Velvet Underground through Phish, believe it or not. The same goes for The Pixies and Pavement. All these bands they would randomly cover. But when I got to college and I met Ben and we were exchanging music, there was this exponential growth of different music we were listening to.

You both went to Wesleyan University, a small liberal arts college in Connecticut, which has a reputation for fostering an eclectic musical community including people like Anthony Braxton, Alvin Lucier, André Vida, Le1f, Das Racist and Amanda Palmer. How important was that for your musical development?

BG: Very important. The thing is, we’re not “cool” people. I grew up in the country and had no real sense of pop culture in the way that the kids I met at college did. I met all these kids who grew up in New York City and who knew about cool underground bands and all that. I didn’t know a ton of stuff, but there was a college radio station I would listen to from Burlington, Vermont, and I had a couple of relatives who would send me mixtapes. But that’s about all I got as for exposure to cool music. A lot of it was just figuring it out on my own, and once the Internet became a place where you could actually find things, it opened up all sorts of doors. At that time it was before a lot of music blogs even existed, so it was always about going on allmusic.com and reading about a band and clicking on the links. That was pretty much how I found out about everything that I knew. There was never a scene I ever belonged to. On the other hand when I got to Wesleyan, my focus soon became experimental music. Ron Kuivila was my adviser, and he does a lot with computer music, programming and synthesis. There’s quite a rich history of that at Wesleyan. John Cage was involved there; David Tudor had his collection of electronic instruments there. I would say that both Andrew and I have learned quite a bit about that approach, although it’s not something that really gets discussed by the press at all. I think we got a lot out of just trying to understand how varied people’s approaches to music have been, many of which are by some people’s standards totally unlistenable, but still really interesting. That’s stuck with us.

There’s a long history of middle-class suburban rockers in America, but when it comes to singing about suburbia it mostly gets shit on as being uncool, inauthentic, or neurotic. But you guys seem in contrast to have embraced it. For better or worse, there was no pretending about who you were or where you’re from.

AVW: We’ve never denied any part of our upbringing to further any concept of authenticity. Our group of friends at Wesleyan were really into drinking milkshakes and going to the mall and exploring roadside attractions in Connecticut. It was a very American, not big-city style of living. And those were experiences that made life at college special. In terms of music at Wesleyan, I actually took Anthony Braxton’s “Large Ensemble” course twice without really being able to read music, but it didn’t really matter. I remember his scores were interesting because he actually couldn’t even read a lot of them because the time signatures would be like 9/16 or something extremely hard to play on the fly. But the class was amazing because a lot of the time he would go off on these incredible tangents channeling some other stuff. Often he’d end up just talking about pop culture or Alien vs. Predator or Britney Spears. And then he’d interrupt himself and go, “What am I saying? What am I saying?” It was amazing just to observe him, even if I wasn’t properly playing music. But we did play a few of his experimental operas, together with Daniela Gesundheit. who has a really amazing voice. Sam Hillmer of Zs was also there, as was Mary Halverson, who is an incredible guitarist.

So experimental music has been an important influence for you both?

AVG: Yeah, the scene at Wesleyan was pretty big, and it certainly influenced us, but in a way where we would be in these classes and, well, sometimes it would be really cool and other times it would just get really painful about how academic the approach would be. It was so much more of the concept over anything else. That’s why our early shows and approaches to live performance were drawing on experimentation in sort of a tongue-in-cheek way—a parody almost. We would go to concerts that were stuffy and pretentious, and our way of handling that was to be as stupid as possible. But at the same time it was formative to go through that experience with Ben, taking classes on Well Tempered Clavier or with Alvin Lucier.

BG: Experimental music for us is about throwing good taste out the window and seeing how taste is a construction. Music can be all these other things. Right now I personally am fascinated by the idea of taste and playing around with that, poking fun at it or challenging what good taste is. You have to get wet, you can’t just say, “I am above taste. It doesn’t affect me.” I’m sure it affected John Cage, too.

(http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/09/Mgmt_Ben_Goldwasser_Electronic_Beats.jpg)

That kind of reminds me of the schizophrenic song shifts in “Siberian Breaks” off Congratulations, a good chunk of which sounds like a recontextualized Carly Simon. It’s interesting how something that’s been relegated to adult contemporary limbo can regain relevance through someone else’s filter—like you guys or even through Ariel Pink, or the reemergence of new-age influences over the past six or seven years. It seems that music doesn’t have to appear “important” to contribute to some kind of evolution.

BG: It’s funny that there are these standards of what is pop music and what isn’t. I actually almost got into an argument with a journalist over it because he was trying to get me to talk about why MGMT suddenly decided not to make pop music anymore. No! We’re making pop music! Who gets to decide who’s making pop music and who’s not? I also think it’s funny, the whole idea of really pretentious people reading blogs and finding these things that nobody knows about and then as soon as people find out about it, it suddenly becomes not cool anymore. That’s just ridiculous to me. I think it’s important to stay above it in a way, but still not to be too good for it.

You never felt possessive about music that you were one of the few who liked or knew about and that then blew up?

BG: I felt like that when I was younger, but I grew out of it. Now I get excited if there’s a band I knew about five years ago who I thought nobody cared about and I felt like a dork for listening to. Then I go to some bar in Brooklyn and hear it on a stereo and people get really excited about it. It’s great that people are listening to this great music. It makes me feel like I’m not alone. But New York is a place that can be kind of unforgiving and saturated with bands, and I understand where the cynicism comes from. There are so many things I don’t give a chance just because they’re hyped up. I think a lot of musicians I talk to these days are way too concerned with the commercial side of things and how to market themselves when they should just be making music and not be worrying about outside influences and what people think of what they’re doing. Especially since Congratulations and all the backlash from people who thought we were one thing and they were wrong, we’ve just kind of learned to not try to explain ourselves too much or to correct people. It’s pop music. It’s pop culture. It’s a stupid world in a lot of ways but it’s still fun to be a part of and deconstruct.

How did your beginnings as a DIY Karaoke band covering other people’s music shape the way you understand how to compose—or how to deconstruct?

AV: I think covering other bands has been extremely important and actually kind of the main theme of the second record, too. Congratulations was in large part an attempt to get into the heads of some of our favorite artists and musicians. And a lot of those people who were the main influences were the guys who were in groups who had some recognition in the sixties and then went off and made their own loner, weirdo solo records, like Skip Spence and Mayo Thompson. I’ve always been drawn to one-off solo ventures. And that’s the side of music we were trying to empathize with on the last record. But it was a really good idea covering-wise to just make music and not think too much about it.

During the making of Congratulations you did a whole joke series of Eno’s Oblique Strategies—his aphorism card deck meant to help artists to get beyond creative block. You titled your faux version Obtuse Strategies and supposedly the first one was “Go fuck yourself”—you’ve also named a song after him.

BG: If anything, “Brian Eno” is a friendly song. We love Brian Eno, but it’s fun to have a joke song about him just because so many people consider him untouchable. He seems like a guy with a good sense of humor.

AVW: Actually, Pete [Kember aka Sonic Boom] was totally into it; he got a big kick out of making different obtuse strategies. We had a whole notebook full of them and a lot were actually a direct take on Eno’s originals. Someone told us that Brian Eno had heard of Obtuse Strategies and thought it was amazing.

Maybe he’ll try to claim it for himself. Anyhow, Congratulations made people pay attention to MGMT who otherwise probably would never have given you a chance. The album sounded almost triply refracted, with you channeling Kember’s eighties vision of sixties psychedelia.

AVW: I think it’s even further refracted because you look at the bands from the sixties looking at the blues and folk stuff. Pete, being into the Rolling Stones, Electric Prunes and Yardbirds, knew that the bands from the sixties were incorporating a lot of American folk and blues in their heyday. We’d actually never even met him before we started Congratulations, but we were both big Spacemen 3 and Spectrum fans. The first few days he was at the studio in Malibu, he’d put on his iPod at dinner and the songs he’d play for us would just blow our minds.

BW: He did a lot of suggesting—playing something in a certain way, recommending music that our playing reminded him of. It wasn’t so much handing the controls over and telling him: “Make some of your cool Spacemen 3 sounds.” We’re pretty comfortable in the studio. Making sounds on our own is what we do. It was a cool collaboration but maybe different from how he’s worked with a lot of people—maybe less hands on, less giving him a really raw thing so he can then determine how it sounds. I think at times we frustrated him because he thought something should sound a certain way and we didn’t. With Oracular Spectacular we were also reluctant to give up any sort of control and wanted to retain as much of the original intention as possible. Actually, I think that there’s something really limiting to that—getting too far inside your own head and losing the ability to censor yourself. On the new record we let producer Dave Fridmann in more than ever before. He can be very neutral, and the last time around we didn’t really ask for his criticism. But this time we did. He ended up kind of reassuring us in the whole process.

There is a lot more of Fridmann’s touch on MGMT. He’s known best for his work with the Flaming Lips and MGMT sounds very much in the vein of The Soft Bulletin, with the monumental pumping drums and the jungle of synths. Actually, it doesn’t sound so far away from the last Flaming Lips album, The Terror, either.

AVW: I can say as Flaming Lips fans and Dave Fridmann fans long before we worked with either, it’s really hard to go into Tar Box Road Studios and play a drumbeat that doesn’t sound like something off Soft Bulletin…

BG: Andrew and I had set up all of this equipment, a lot of analogue synths and sequencers and drum machines hooked up together. We would just hit record and end up with literally hours of music, mostly improvised without a set idea of what we were going to do. We built up so much material, and then we got really intimidated by what to do with it for the next step. We knew there were some really good moments in it, but we didn’t know what to do with it. Dave stepped up, which allowed us to be much more editors than composers because for me a lot of compositional stuff is kind of boring. I don’t want to sound like a jerk, but I hear so much music where I just wonder, “Who do you want to impress with your compositional prowess? Great, your songs have a bunch of complicated parts, but who cares?” We just made this stuff, and we didn’t know what it is or where it came from, but we thought why don’t we just take the best parts and fit them together?

When you worked with Fridmann on Oracular Spectacular you brought a lot of the really lo-fi tracks you recorded on your own, and he managed to combine them with all of his hi-fi studio wizardry. It’s as if that very particular sound—copied and coveted the world over—was born out of this unlikely pairing of amateurism and expertise.

BG: The funny thing is that back then we’d sometimes complain like, “We’re in this fancy studio—aren’t you going to take what we did and make it sound better? Aren’t you going to rerecord everything using all these nice microphones?” I don’t know if we really got the point across then, but at the time for him it was much more exciting to use our crappy demos and the idiosyncrasies inherent in our initial recordings and transform them instead of making a real slick sounding recording. He did kind of a similar thing with Kevin Parker from Tame Impala, who is totally self-taught in terms of recording. Dave used his uniqueness as an important part of their sound, too. On the other hand, I’m just so excited that anyone can make a record these days. Plug-ins are getting so good now. Everybody talks about how analogue is better, and maybe it is for some things, but I don’t know . . . I think it’s way cooler that anybody can make a good sounding record in their bedroom. My friend Carolyn [Polachek] from Chairlift is recording an entire album using the mics from her MacBook.

Molly Nilsson has recorded every single album like that.

BG: I think it’s something in hindsight people will recognize more. People think it’s an internal mic on a laptop so it must be crappy. But these days people fetishize four-track recordings and attach all this mojo to it that in the past nobody would have ever done.

Getting back to the new album, MGMT, I think really seems to have two sides, like tape or vinyl. Side A is more classically song oriented, while Side B has the darker, deconstructive, more experimental edits where song structures or harmonic structures emerge in quite unexpected ways.

BG: Actually, a lot of the music on the second half of this album has no harmonic structure at all. It’s just so many layers on top of each other and a lot of things tonally that won’t fit together in a traditional sense. But that’s been done before. I suppose “Astromancy” has ended up being my favorite song, which is the one we finished last. It’s a song where nothing fits together and there’s all sorts of space in between the sounds, which disallows you to concentrate on a single thing. All of the sonic elements appear to be trying to divert your attention. I think it invites a different way of listening.

AVW: Everything changes on the second half of the album. On certain tracks like “I Love You Too, Death” we both were interested in the simplicity of something like “Dream Baby Dream” by Suicide or stuff by Disco Inferno, and we were trying to attain a song shape that we’ve never crafted before—pretty much like a rising line, a train which accelerates and then just cuts off. No verse, no chorus. Just building momentum.

On the first half of the album I was intrigued by the contrast between the poppier arrangements on the one hand and much darker lyrics on the other. It reminded me of a specific kind of pop song, like VU’s “Who Loves The Sun?” or The Stone Roses’ “I Wanna Be Adored”—that’s how I hear the single “Life Is a Lie”, for example.

AVW: “I don’t have to sell my soul / He’s already in me…”

BG: In some ways I would say this album is more optimistic than Congratulations because it’s more about empowerment. It’s about saying we’re all strong enough to look all these scary things in the face and deal with them. I’m so sick of all this indie rock that’s coming out that’s about finding a space where everything is OK and telling everyone they’re safe and sound. Everything is not OK and everyone should know that. But we can deal with it. I don’t think this album is dark or depressing. It’s reality. It’s about freaking yourself out in a good way and getting more real. It’s not about “Everything sucks.” We’re all going to make things better and become better people if we confront those lies.

AVW: It’s weird because for all three albums the music has come first for pretty much every song. So when it comes to writing lyrics, I’m not sure if I somehow want there to be a big disparity between the feeling of the music and the tone of the lyrics. I do think, consciously or not, that disparity has been part of the spirit of the band from the beginning. We had a little EP that we made as seniors in college called We Care/We Don’t Care. To me, it was a sign that we always wanted two opposing things happening at once. But like Ben said, I think there were much darker moments on Congratulations, though MGMT has more of what you’re talking about. An hour and a half into improvising, with twelve different things going at once, we would look at each other and not know where the sounds were coming from or who was making what. There, an otherworldly thing that happens. A lot of the new songs are about a relationship to some intangible enlightenment, an inherent drive to attain a deeper answer—and the frustration of not being able to pay attention long enough to start down that road.

BG: I think Andrew is way more into the mystical side of things, and I’m way more into rational science and math stuff. I don’t have a lot of tolerance for the mystical and superstition, whereas he really loves getting into that. Every now and again we’ll have an argument about it, but we still love each other.

That’s funny, Ben, because I had the impression that you were religious, based on a quote I found online in the Jewish Chronicle: “I am unavoidably, ineradicably, Jewish. It’s in my heart, my head and my blood.”

BG: I didn’t say that! They totally took my quote out of context—or rather they entirely made it up. But you can’t really do anything about it. I don’t even think that many people read it, but it sucks when people feel like they have to make up something to make their story better. I don’t identify with any religion at all but I’m really interested in all religions. I would never want to associate myself with just one of them.

So you’re agnostics when it comes to religion—and equally as cagey when it comes to politics? You’ve described the new album as “prismatically post-political”. What does that mean?

BG: Andrew writes the lyrics, but I can say that things are approaching the point of becoming completely ridiculous in terms of some of what America is doing. It’s getting to the point where I really can’t say that I trust the government to do what’s best for me at all. But at the same time it doesn’t have anything to do with political parties. I just don’t feel safe at this point. I don’t have complete confidence that people in this country can just take their freedom for granted the way they have been for a long time.

In what sense?

BG: There are some basic freedoms that people should have that are being systematically violated, and that’s scary. But a lot of overtly political music annoys me. Music is a higher art and not just about topical songs. For me, it’s about sound and having a transcendental experience through sound, and I think words can sometimes get in the way of that if they’re too literal…

AVW: You know, our music isn’t topical in the sense of having an obvious connection to any political movement or current event. The music is more addressing the feelings we get when we ask ourselves if and how we want to address that stuff. It’s more connecting to a current consciousness or feeling that, having played shows all over the world and meeting lots of people, seems common everywhere. Like Ben said, it’s way bigger than political parties, but it’s also very hard to define or talk about it. However, I know it exists. I think of it as a sensation where everything appears OK but with an underlying sense that it’s all wrong. It’s hard to say why and even when you try to say why it’s like that, something cuts you off. I’m not good at describing or defining it. It’s fear. Without being totally aware of it, I’ve been living my life since high school assuming that everything I type or write or every website I go to, somebody else is seeing it. I think a lot of other people feel the same way, but it wasn’t until more recently that most people stopped thinking just casually about it and started thinking that it was fucked up. Ben and I stay pretty up to date with the news, but we never really want to put it in our music unless it’s in an encrypted manner. I don’t know if that’s about a fear of directly addressing it, but if someone were to come out and go full Bob Dylan, I don’t know if it would even fit in this day and age.

It’s strange, but one of the most fitting lyrics on the new album that describes you as a band comes in your Faine Jade cover…

AVW: I know what you mean: “Striving for perfection / hiding when it comes.” ~
http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/features/interviews/everything-is-not-ok-an-interview-with-mgmt/ (http://www.electronicbeats.net/en/features/interviews/everything-is-not-ok-an-interview-with-mgmt/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 16, 2013, 08:26:46 AM
A nice little review from The National by a writer who actually listened to the album

In MGMT the music is out there

Talking to Rolling Stone earlier this year about the making of their third album, the duo who formed MGMT at Wesleyan University, Connecticut, made a comment that might have given their record company – and fans of their hooky 2008 single Time to Pretend – pause for thought.

“We’re not trying to make music that everyone understands the first time they hear it,” said Ben Goldwasser of his and Andrew VanWyngarden’s latest psychedelic voyage. He wasn’t joking.

Like Talk Talk’s Laughing Stock or professed influence Aphex Twin’s 1995 EP Donkey Rhubarb, MGMT isn’t coming to a karaoke night near you any time soon. Its synth-heavy sonics are decidedly, but not unpleasantly, disorientating, and the title of the kooky, children’s voice-led opener Alien Days – imagine Pinocchio confessing his love of psychedelia to Jiminy Cricket – immediately signals a record aiming to be different.

Produced once again by their trusted aid David Fridmann, the work packs some of the grand existential oddness of other Fridmann-affiliated acts such as Mercury Rev and The Flaming Lips. MGMT is much closer to the out-there experimentation of the latter band’s The Terror than it is to the Rev’s more traditionally structured Deserter’s Songs. It also shuns typical verse- chorus structures and works hard to bring you sounds you haven’t heard before: queasy little synth solos, much meddled-with samples, things that go bump in the night.

Even the record’s most accessible song, the recent single Your Life Is a Lie, is a manic, lurching affair that slowly endears itself to you via a machine-like hammering out of its titular hook. It’s telling, too, that the album’s lone cover-version is Introspection, an obscure 1968 song by Faine Jade from Long Island, New York, a man sometimes seen as America’s answer to Pink Floyd’s Syd Barrett. This is decidedly a record for those in the know.

Elsewhere, things only get more outré. I Love You to Death begins with a soundscape of synth-pulses, finger-cymbals, laughter and some kind of exotic wind instrument, but before long VanWyngarden is musing: “Every stranger is a ghost.”

The otherness of MGMT’s nearest musical relatives – The Flaming Lips – works partly because it’s buoyed by their frontman Wayne Coyne’s great charisma, but Goldwasser and VanWyngarden don’t have quite the same dynamism, or half as much to say. You have to admire the stubborn ambition of their third album, but some may find it an insular, alienating ride.



Read more: http://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/pop-reviews/in-mgmt-the-music-is-out-there#ixzz2f3ttTJUA (http://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/pop-reviews/in-mgmt-the-music-is-out-there#ixzz2f3ttTJUA)
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Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 16, 2013, 09:00:51 AM
I like this interview because it wasn't the same old questions and they seemed to open up more than usual.  Lots of good insight into them as individuals and as musicians. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 16, 2013, 09:14:13 AM
I like this interview because it wasn't the same old questions and they seemed to open up more than usual.  Lots of good insight into them as individuals and as musicians.

I was fascinated all the way through.  It was very personal.  The school stuff was so interesting to think about...I mean to think that they studied together for four years!  I usually just think of them as partying and playing music at Wesleyan.  Awesome feature.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 16, 2013, 09:16:46 AM
Here's the NME review:

Thought the US psych explorers might play it safe this time? Think again: their third LP finds them further out than ever
Read more at http://www.nme.com/reviews/mgmt/14769#VGMzAVMT6i11H8BL.99 (http://www.nme.com/reviews/mgmt/14769#VGMzAVMT6i11H8BL.99)
8/10
Pity the band stuck in the last-chance saloon. Once you’ve squandered your success and your corporate paymasters are worried about the running costs of their shareholders’ yachts, you’re going to get reined in. So pity MGMT. After 2010’s ‘Congratulations’ – a bitter, courgette-flavoured lozenge compared to the candyfloss pop of debut album ‘Oracular Spectacular’ in 2007 – their self-titled third album surely sees the band coerced into that purgatory, forced to whip up more ironic electro anthems under the threat of losing their deal… The hell it does. Despite their decimated fanbase, Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser have refused to back down from their ongoing musical odyssey. In truth, outside of the accountants’ offices, ‘Congratulations’ was no disappointment: a set of pocket symphonies packed with more ideas than most bands have in their whole careers. But it was just too different to their debut for most casual fans, being inspired more by the alternative ’80s of Television Personalities and The Deep Freeze Mice than Bowie or Prince. ‘MGMT’ is something else entirely, though, and even more far-out than the whimsical treats of ‘Alien Days’ and ‘Your Life Is A Lie’ have so far suggested. It’s a dark, difficult album – perhaps the weirdest that a major label has released in years – that shares the electronic soundbed of ‘Oracular…’, but little else. Throughout, the drums are distorted and glitchy, and synths drift woozily by, having more in common with Boards Of Canada’s acid mysticism than the glittering, glammy riffs of MGMT’s debut. Recorded by Andrew and Ben without their live band, and with the help of producer Dave Fridmann, it really does sound like two stoned bedroom explorers, lost beneath an avalanche of vintage synths, bravely blasting even further away from what normally troubles the charts on Earth. So the tie-dye T-shirts and proggy twists and turns may have gone, but this is undoubtedly the most mind-altering, psychedelic music MGMT have yet made. The mantra-like ‘I Love You Too, Death’ is decorated with Indian drones and finger cymbals; ‘Mystery Disease’, which chugs along with all the inertia and menace of Suicide covering ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’, is packed with VanWyngarden’s eerie, dead-eyed proclamations. All together now, V Festival: “When the west wind sweeps through the leaves/ Emperors of history fall to their knees”. One highlight is ‘Introspection’, a cover of a forgotten ’60s gem by Faine Jade, which unwittingly exposes the inner workings of the whole album: yesteryear’s drug-damaged psych-folk flights of fancy clothed in the harsh digital fineries of today. On the sombre peaks of ‘An Orphan Of Fortune’ and ‘A Good Sadness’, the dewy-eyed melodies and dismembered arrangements are complemented by lyrics dripping with childhood memories and spooky, half-remembered dreams. Some will still lament the death of ‘pop MGMT’. Aside from ‘Alien Days’, ‘Your Life Is A Lie’ and the jaunty electro-strut of ‘Plenty Of Girls In The Sea’, which unsettlingly comes on like Fiery Furnaces covering The Kinks, there’s little here that would please those fans who never bothered with ‘Congratulations’. But no-one needs them to churn out inferior versions of ‘Kids’ for cash – after all, Foster The People do that well enough. In a world where bands exist merely to bag the next phone ad soundtrack, the guts and wild abandon of the pair’s singular, foolhardy vision is rare indeed. In fact, as if it wasn’t clear enough already, MGMT aren’t here to please you, or their label – and if you think they owe you another ‘Kids’, you’re as misguided as the grannies who lost interest when The Beatles got into those jazz cigarettes and went a bit funny. So, all aboard: ‘MGMT’ might be an uncomfortable journey at times, but it’s also a transcendental one you’ve never been on before. Forget the shareholders – it’s time for us to give MGMT a proper chance, on their own terms. Tom Pinnock
Read more at http://www.nme.com/reviews/mgmt/14769#VGMzAVMT6i11H8BL.99 (http://www.nme.com/reviews/mgmt/14769#VGMzAVMT6i11H8BL.99)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 16, 2013, 09:42:37 AM
I like this interview because it wasn't the same old questions and they seemed to open up more than usual.  Lots of good insight into them as individuals and as musicians.

I was fascinated all the way through.  It was very personal.  The school stuff was so interesting to think about...I mean to think that they studied together for four years!  I usually just think of them as partying and playing music at Wesleyan.  Awesome feature.

I think the fact that they were music majors and like you said, studied together, isn't touched upon enough and that's really too bad. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 16, 2013, 10:51:26 AM
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323527004579077122648782260.html (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323527004579077122648782260.html)

A few hours before MGMT performed on "The Late Show With David Letterman," its founding duo Benjamin Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden could be seen people-watching in Midtown.

"Everyone's a tourist up here," said Mr. Goldwasser.

"I like the beautiful Scandinavian families," Mr. VanWyngarden said of the scene. "Those are my favorite." They cracked up at the sight of a poodle and its owner in matching neon eyewear.

Seeing the strange in the everyday carries over to MGMT's music, and few 21st-century rock acts have had its consistently good fortunes. Messrs. Goldwasser and VanWyngarden, now both 30 years old, met during their freshman year at Wesleyan University and, after graduation, signed with Columbia Records.

"Oracular Spectacular," MGMT's 2007 debut, was a surprise hit, landing on the Billboard charts and making fans out of Beck, Bruce Springsteen and Paul McCartney along the way. The band's less pop-oriented second album, 2010's "Congratulations," wasn't as well-received, and members found themselves defending their sophomore effort against fans and critics.

This week MGMT releases its highly anticipated third album, also called "MGMT," and this time, the duo sees themselves as oddballs in it for the long haul. "Recording the new album, we experienced a feeling of wanting to free ourselves up to be more uninhibited and creative," said Mr. VanWyngarden.

"We had to strengthen our constitutions, what with everything we went through having to defend ourselves after our second album," Mr. Goldwasser said. "A few of our fans were angry at us for squandering the chance to completely sell out and become mega-pop stars after our first album."

For the first time, he added, critics accused MGMT of committing career suicide. "I think it is funny that a flute or a 12-minute song could be so offensive to people," Mr. VanWyngarden said. "If we really wanted to commit career suicide, we could have done it in really awesome, spectacular ways."

Using analog synthesizers, loops and drum machines, MGMT brings its pop and psychedelic sensibilities together on "MGMT" songs like "Alien Days" and "Your Life Is a Lie." "Ben and I would build up these patterns and get very lost in them," said Mr. VanWyngarden. "The best stuff happened after we'd be going for an hour and kind of forgot what we were doing."

Before he and Mr. Goldwasser had gotten far in the songwriting process, they booked studio time in upstate New York with producer Dave Fridmann, who has worked with the Flaming Lips for decades and produced MGMT's first album. "We went into the studio with hardly anything just to see what would happen, and it ended up being the best recording experience we ever had," said Mr. Goldwasser.

Due to the vintage keyboards and components they used, repeating sounds precisely was difficult but welcome. "The album became more about preserving this thing that happened once and can never happen again," said Mr. VanWyngarden, "and then stringing together a lot of those moments and forming these songs."

For the Letterman performance, however, MGMT opted to play "Your Life Is a Lie," a track with more traditional beginnings. "It is a song we wrote by a campfire outside the studio cracking ourselves up, writing all the lyrics really fast," said Mr. VanWyngarden.

The most striking instrument onstage wasn't a modular synthesizer but a staple of classic rock—"this giant cowbell, close to 3 feet long and weighing over 70 pounds, mounted on a giant truss," said Mr. VanWyngarden. "It was a rare example of one of those goofy ideas we had that came true."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 16, 2013, 01:21:06 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09/16/mgmt-new-album_n_3915711.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09/16/mgmt-new-album_n_3915711.html)
MGMT New Album To Drop Sept. 17, 'Definitely Not' A Return To Form

In the wake of the runaway success that followed their instantly iconic debut record Oracular Spectacular, MGMT found themselves feeling very conflicted. On the one hand, there was a great deal of pressure to recreate the mass appeal of hit singles like "Kids" and "Time to Pretend," but the band also longed to evolve as burgeoning sonic artists.

With the release of the band's self-titled third album, which is set to drop September 17 via Columbia Records, we can be certain that MGMT have boldly opted to forge a new path. You won't find soaring synth-pop anthems on this collection of densely psychedelic tunes: multinstrumentalist and co-songwriter Ben Goldwasser says he and collaborator Andrew VanWyngarden have let go of all expectations and crafting a disc that truly embraces their restlessly creative spirit.

"After the wild ride we’ve been on the last few years, we’re getting the sense of being grounded, and [we’re] able to ignore the background noise and let something happen naturally," Goldwasser says. "To us, [the new album] feels like the most honest thing we’ve ever done—not so much irony as some of the music we made before. The more we worked on the album, the more we felt that way about it."

That honesty is reflected in the album's minimalist title. When asked to explain why the band opted to name it after themselves, Goldwasser admits the title started off as a joke about the weight of their expectations. But the meaning quickly shifted, turning into a forthright emblem for where MGMT's collective head is at. The new album is not designed as a "return to form," and they like it that way.

"We thought it was a funny thing to do. There are some examples of bands who’ve self-titled their third or fourth album, and it’s kind of [presented] as the “return to form” or something. It’s funny, because it’s definitely not that for us. If anything, we’re going further into outer space than we’ve ever been, musically."

This interstellar journey is comprised of a set of sprawling, largely electronic-based psychedelic grooves, like "Mystery Disease" and lead single "Alien Days," both of which have been previewed in a live concert setting.

So how exactly did the band figure out how to abandon Oracular's anthemic synth-pop and the madcap '60s-inspired pop of their sophomore album Congratulations? Goldwasser says that a new songwriting process was necessary in order to chart new sonic terrain.

"We didn’t have too much of an idea of what we wanted the record to sound like until we figured out the new way of writing. We started to experiment with having a lot of gear set up and synchronized together so we could perform live and write as we were improvising. We recorded really long sections of music, and [went] back and edited it. Especially the second half of the album, a lot of it was created in that way."

As an album, MGMT is compositionally complex. But Goldwasser adds that in an effort to embrace elaborate songwriting, he gleaned inspiration from a far more straight-forward musical aesthetic.

"Musically, I’ve been really inspired by a lot of punk rock," he says. "Less sonically and more conceptually. I really get into how a lot of punk music really plays around with styles, and doesnt take the ideas of style too seriously."

For a band who spent years searching for the best way to expand upon a signature style in which they felt unfairly confined, the free-floating sound of MGMT most definitely comes off as a punk rock move.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 17, 2013, 02:03:23 AM
I'm going to forgive him for Calling Congratulations "difficult."

http://www.tonedeaf.com.au/reviews/new-music/344344/mgmt.htm] [url]http://www.tonedeaf.com.au/reviews/new-music/344344/mgmt.htm (http://[url)[/url]


Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser have traversed three different phases as a musical duo.

In their nascency they called themselves The Management, before abbreviating the name and releasing the fame-inducing debut, Oracular Spectacular.

With the following Congratulations MGMT explored their own distinctive sound, one that was far from the sonic textures that numerous bands would imitate in the years following Oracular.

Their sophomore album saw them break free from mainstream audiences, creating a difficult yet ultimately rewarding opus.

With Congratulations having prepared our ears, the self-titled MGMT subtracts the difficulty and provides greater rewards.

While synthesizers defined Congratulations, it was grounded in acoustic instruments.  Humanising lyrics serve the same purpose on MGMT, in evidence on tracks like ‘A Good Sadness’ and ‘I Love You Too, Death’.

The album’s motif of finding beauty in melancholia is apparent in such track titles, as much of what exemplifies MGMT is its tones of foreboding. They permeate in ways that counter the wacky spaceship synths on opener ‘Alien Days’.

While layers of ornate psychedelia mesmerise on the likes of ‘Astro-Mancy’, ‘Mystery Disease’ and ‘An Orphan Of Fortune’, there are more straightforward pop hooks to halt the album from falling prey to its own egomania.

See ‘Introspection’, ‘Your Life Is A Lie’ and ‘Plenty Of Girls’ if you’re searching for the earworm tactics they left behind in the grave of Oracular Spectacular.  Yet even these tracks are slow to reveal the richness of their complexities.

Therein lies the triumph of MGMT. The essence of its captivation slowly changes with each spin, ensuring that our interest outlasts the initial promise.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 17, 2013, 03:01:19 AM
From the NY Times  :)
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/17/arts/music/new-music-from-mgmt-kenny-garrett.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/17/arts/music/new-music-from-mgmt-kenny-garrett.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0)

“MGMT” (Columbia)

Something’s always looming and buzzing — or burbling, or clattering, or tapping, or ratcheting, or blipping, or quavering — near the foreground throughout MGMT’s third album, “MGMT.” It makes the album both testing and, eventually, rewarding.

Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, who write and record as MGMT, have embraced excess since MGMT’s 2007 debut album, “Oracular Spectacular.” Their lyrics are ornately elusive, their arrangements deploy a neo-psychedelic profusion of instruments, and many of their songs pack in multiple episodes. MGMT trimmed back those tendencies enough to start their major-label career with three singles from “Oracular Spectacular” that pushed forward drumbeats and keyboard hooks to hint at 1970s pop in “Time to Pretend,” “Electric Feel” and the two-million-selling “Kids.” But MGMT’s second album, “Congratulations” in 2010, spurned pop mechanics, reaching back to the most baroque confections of 1960s pop, yielding no hits.

Behind the disco-ball gleam of “Oracular Spectacular” was a fascination with youthful bravado and disillusionment; the labyrinthine songs of “Congratulations” grappled — and quarreled — with commercial success. On “MGMT,” Mr. VanWyngarden and Mr. Goldwasser have even larger ambitions. They ponder purpose, fate and mortality in songs like “Mystery Disease,” “Your Life Is a Lie” and “I Love You Too, Death.”

The album’s keynote is borrowed: “Introspection,” a folk-rock song from a 1968 album by a Long Island songwriter who called himself Faine Jade. It vows, “There’s a reason, and I will someday find the plan.” MGMT are less optimistic; their songs see growing malaise and the inevitability of loss and deterioration.

Which explains the sound. There’s still a late-1960s foundation to most songs, while MGMT make fewer digressions from verse-chorus-bridge than on “Congratulations.” But the music has turned less antiquarian. With the producer Dave Fridmann, MGMT have piled on layers and loops of percussion, electronics and effects: an almost overwhelming welter of activity, a meticulous clamor that wells up and changes throughout every track. It’s the entropy that, sooner or later, awaits us all. JON PARELES
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 17, 2013, 07:03:31 AM
Here's the full Digital Spy interview as promised 

http://www.digitalspy.com/music/interviews/a513492/mgmt-interview-were-not-trying-to-be-obscure.ht (http://www.digitalspy.com/music/interviews/a513492/mgmt-interview-were-not-trying-to-be-obscure.ht)

MGMT, it's fair to say, aren't the duo most envisioned when they emerged on the scene with the psych-pop hits there were 'Time to Pretend' and 'Kids'.

Congratulations, their follow-up to debut Oracular Spectacular, was a less immediate venture and more like the band they really wanted to become.

With their third album coming, Digital Spy met up with Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden to chat about what fans can expect from their new record, if we'll ever see the MGMT 'of old' and, ahem, listening to David Guetta in the car...

Hi Ben, Andrew. Your new album is self-titled - does that mean it's the all-defining MGMT record?
Ben: "The name is more of a reference to the stereotype that a band's third album is a return to form or their definitive statement. We thought it would be funny to call it MGMT."
Andrew: "We were playing on the cliche of a band to have a self-titled album as their third."

So you're being tongue-in-cheek in calling it MGMT...
Ben: "Yeah, but I think it actually ended up ringing true. I think this is the most comfortable we've ever been - it seemed very uninhibited and the whole recording process had a nice flow to it. I think we ended up actually fulfilling [the title]."
Andrew: "It's not the ultimate sound that defines our band but we're getting as close as we've come to something that combines all our different styles since college."

I've read that you tried to uncover a new sound in pop with this album. Was that hard? Were you ever concerned you were making something that wasn't completely original?
Andrew: "It's never gonna be completely original and we did a cover song on the album, and that's obviously been around. We just wanted to force ourselves to try different things and go out on different limbs. It's also just what was coming out of our heads naturally in 2012. We improvised and jammed and there was this happy feeling, falling on the floor laughing over a synthesiser sound. But then we'd be like, 'Now we have to write our album', then, 'Why can't this be the album?' That's kind of how it happened."
Ben: "We didn't judge what we were doing against a lot of other music. We've played around with making really obvious references to different styles and eras of pop music [before]. We always want to make accessible music and even though the structures of the songs aren't straightforward, it's still a very inviting record. It's not trying to be obscure."

Your last album Congratulations was much less immediate than your debut Oracular Spectacular, but I listened to it more as a result. How can you tell that your songs will grow on people like that?
Andrew: "You can't ever be certain. Our goal is to make the songs sound completely different every time you listen to them, and follow a different path each time. I guess some people will say that's scary cos people's attention spans - these days they only listen to the beginning of songs!"
Ben: "If it has that [growing] effect on us, we're happy. We're not too concerned with what other people are going to think of it. We just hope that if it's music we like, it'll find an audience."

What about your fans? Do you ever worry, 'What if they don't like this new sound?'
Ben: "The thought occurs to us once in a while but it's not something that we really draw on. We have a really good relationship with our fans and it seems like at this point, they're really excited to see us do something different each time."

'I Love You Too, Death' and 'Mystery Disease' from MGMT both have that aura where they sound so fluid but you can tell much hard work and effort was put into editing them down. Was the editing this tough to do?
Ben: "It was a learning process. We'd never worked like that before, where the songwriting was recording ourselves playing. A lot of the tracks on the album are just edited versions of that."
Andrew: "For 'I Love You Too, Death', [the editing process] was at times tenuous as to what the song was. We added all these elements and we wanted it to sound like a train that starts off slow and keeps going."

That feeling of relief when you realize what the song should be - is that the best part of being in MGMT?
Ben: "I think that's when we're the most comfortable. We love playing shows and figuring out how to translate to a live audience. But I think we're probably more comfortable in the studio experimenting with sounds."

Is MGMT a response to current chart music?
Andrew: "In part, I think. When we first met, we were listening to mainstream pop radio and singing along with Avril Lavigne, and we covered a Pink song. That appreciation for all-out mainstream pop music was always incorporated into our sound. I think there is a little bit of that spirit left in us now, but this time it was more of a reaction to every single song on the radio being about going out and drinking like it's the last night of your life. Ben and I were in agreement that if somehow you knew it was the last night of your life, the last place on earth I'd wanna be is in some s**ty club drinking vodka!"
Ben: "[The new album is] not necessarily a direct response [to chart music], but I think we were more conscious of making something that was current. Maybe in the past we've had more nostalgia for older music and this ideal of 'how music used to be', but I think this album seems more like current music to me."

Do you still follow the charts like you did when you first met?
Ben: "Every now and then. The production a lot of the time is really cool and impressive. But it's hard for me to identify with a lot of the lyrics. So much of it seems to be about completely forgetting any sort of responsibility and having fun. It's nice that people have that music to turn off the world to, but it doesn't have the kind of staying power that I crave."
Andrew: "I do a lot of driving cos I'm 45 minutes outside of New York and I switch on Top 40 radio a lot."

Anything ever take your fancy, Andrew?
Andrew: "Not really and I don't even know most of the names of the songs... What's that huge song - I don't actually like it cos I get so furious when it gets stuck in my head - 'I am titanium...'"

David Guetta featuring Sia?
Andrew: "Yeah. It drills into your brain!"

That is quite a confession! It's been three years since Congratulations - at any point making MGMT were you afraid you'd been away too long?
Ben: "A little bit. But when you see how bands come and go, and certain bands find favor with the press then a year later no-one cares about them, that happens so much we don't feel entitled to people paying attention to us every time we do anything."
Andrew: "At the end of 2010, we were playing shows that for us were really big and the crowds were so enthusiastic about the new songs. We were seeing this different world than a lot of people associated with our album... people thought we were trying to distance ourselves from our fans. We're both 30 now and it's our third album on a major label, but [that experience] didn't have the effect of us going into the studio, 'We have to write a hit song now!' As cool as it would be to have that, it wasn't coming natural. I hope one day in the future we can have some awesome ripping pop song like David Guetta!"

There's a mystery to the band, as well. Fans probably only see you when you release and tour an album. How much of this is intentional?
Ben: "I think we're both private people in a way and not really into the whole rockstar image. We're more into making music and finding people who like it. It's hard for us to explain [the music] in words - it's not about one thing in particular or trying to accomplish a specific goal. We're not trying to be obscure by being mysterious in any way - we'd rather people figure out what it means on their own."
Andrew: "It's not like we're wearing masks. I think that's what's so incredible about Daft Punk, how complete their myth is and impenetrable their image is - it's pretty amazing. That's not where we're at, but I'm happy that there is some mystery and questions around our band."

Do you think bands give too much stuff away now, on their Twitter and Facebook pages? And do their fans now expect that?
Ben: "Yeah, that stuff really bothers me. And people have come to expect that from the artist, that they should be sharing every aspect of their lives. It dilutes the whole thing in a way, and I don't know if it'll ever be the same again where there were people like David Bowie. Who really knew anything about David Bowie? He was able to craft this mysterious image that wasn't really him but this character (Ziggy Stardust) he created. You don't know how much of it was him or the character. That's something that is getting lost."
Andrew: "We started tweeting really late, in January [2013]. It felt so cool. But we're about on our hundredth tweet."

Lastly, is there anyone out there you'd like to collaborate with?
Ben: "I think all the people I'd wanna collaborate with wouldn't wanna collaborate with me! Most of the time I hear about a collaboration, it seems pretty contrived."

Not Guetta, Andrew?
Andrew: "I think he actually has maybe approached us."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 17, 2013, 11:48:34 AM
Glide
http://www.glidemagazine.com/40081/mgmt-mgmt/ (http://www.glidemagazine.com/40081/mgmt-mgmt/)


First, a word on that jacket cover: is this a band selling, or a band for sale? The sign hanging above the pictured consignment shop/hair salon — Stylz Unlimited — suggests a bit of both. And in the foreground, MGMT’s Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser appear open for business, content with mingling among the relics.

On MGMT, the duo does its damnedest to avoid alienating those thrown by 2010’s Congratulations. They still navigate the aisles of 60’s psych and 80’s new wave, but they’ve also refined their production patchwork of bleeps and thuds with a prevailing tightness. And good on the record label for refusing to meddle in this third album’s direction; MGMT was free to experiment, which meant more than a year of self-imposed exile and endless tinkering in a New York cabin with their electronics and their egos.

MGMT might stop short of the fun and the success of the 2007 debut, Oracular Spectacular, but it induces an array of subtle, addictive moments: the cascading child vocals of the opener, “Alien Days;” those crashing piano chords behind the murky percussion of “Cool Song No. 2.” And “Your Life is a Lie,” with its punchy, snare-crack handclaps, is the two-minute upper the album needed to survive the trip. For the first recording of their thirties, VanWyngarden and Goldwasser again live up to what they praise in a line from “I Love You Too, Death”:

“You always leave me wanting more.”
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 17, 2013, 07:26:50 PM
http://www.heyreverb.com/blog/2013/09/17/album-review-mgmt-mgmt/77460/ (http://www.heyreverb.com/blog/2013/09/17/album-review-mgmt-mgmt/77460/)

Reverb

MGMT‘s post-”Oracular Spectacular” career has in many ways been like watching a melodrama unfold. First there was the Spin article that featured frontman Andrew VanWyngaarden getting 86′d from a homeless shelter; then the alleged piss bottle hurled at them during their set at Glastonbury. Every time they didn’t play hit single “Kids,” it somehow merited mention in some music blog. Still kids themselves, VanWyngaarden and Ben Goldwasser were understandably bewildered in the wake of their 900,000 copy-selling debut.

Their follow-up album “Congratulations” only served turn the screw harder on the duo. With no discernible singles, it was several notches too left-field for many in their established fan base, who’d signed up for indie-club songs like “Electric Feel” and “Kids”—not the Monster Mash rock of “Song For Dan Treacy.”

While “Congratulations” definitely wasn’t a pop album, compared to the duo’s new self-titled release, it’s downright conventional. The doors of perception are wide open on their third LP, “MGMT,” an overstuffed electro-psych kaleidoscope that’s as fascinating as it is overwhelming.

The songs on “MGMT” rarely stay in one place, flowing inside themselves and following rabbits holes unexpectedly. “Alien Days,” the album’s best-bet single (alternatively the Faine Jade-cover, “Introspection”), starts with empowering rock drum rhythm and bright guitar chords that lull you into a false sense of security before devolving into unease, revealing a manic bongo solo in the final third. The wriggling synth on “Mystery Disease” has a mind of its own, occasionally faltering and following an independent phrase for a few bars, then receding below angelic strings and a bouncing drum sequence. It might sounds ill fated, but it’s fun to pick these little sub-plots out within the songs, which usually work within the album’s non-existent parameters.

This sound packing is at times designed to overwhelm, and it will before too long. “Your Life Is A Lie” is in itself swamping (and especially so when digesting “MGMT” as a whole), boxing your ears with an unrelenting cowbell and throwing three distinct rhythms at you at one point. But in an otherwise weighty record, it’s the album’s goofiest track, expounding on psychedelic revelations with the rhetoric of a pre-K teacher: “Count your friends / on your hands / now look again / they’re not your friends.” Afterward, “A Good Sadness” builds for a minute before laying into a mechanized NIN rhythm, signaling the start of the record’s gloomy second half.



The free-verse “Astro-Mancy” and “I Love You Too, Death” are more thought experiment than song, and most will have no patience for them. Over spare rhythms, VanWyngaarden soothes with sets of obfuscated lyrics in each, both as decipherable as a Rorschach test or any other song on the album, for that matter. The songs are similar in style to the band’s avant-garde set at the Guggenheim, an experience that seems to have factored heavily in how they’ve approached music since. The mood bucks up a little with the psych mantra “There’s Plenty Of Girls In The Sea,” but relents with the record’s weary, Pink Floydian closer, “An Orphan Of Fortune.”

With “MGMT,” the band has again favored the unknown over variations on a theme, which fans of “Oracular Spectacular”—including Columbia record execs—would have loved. If you’re willing to slap on some headphones and give it a few spins of undivided attention, the album reveals some intriguing soundscapes to gawk at. It’ll probably piss a lot of their early adaptors off, but the band didn’t come about by kowtowing to popular demand. Seeing as they’ve branded their latest and weirdest record as self-titled—rock’s version of bold and underlined—you should expect the unexpected from MGMT if you haven’t already.

Follow our news and updates on Twitter, our relationship status on Facebook and our search history on Google +. Or send us a telegram.

Dylan Owens is Reverb’s indie and bluegrass blogger. You can read more from him in Relix magazine and the comment sections of WORLDSTARHIPHOP.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 18, 2013, 05:33:27 AM
Examiner

http://www.examiner.com/review/album-review-mgmt-get-weirder-and-don-t-care-about-it-on-self-titled-record (http://www.examiner.com/review/album-review-mgmt-get-weirder-and-don-t-care-about-it-on-self-titled-record)


MGMT "MGMT" album
Rating:StarStarStarStarStar
September 17, 2013
Alternative rock act MGMT released its third album, a self-titled one, on Tuesday. On the 10-track LP, the band gets weirder and more far out than their past releases. To fans still waiting for the next “Kids” or “Time to Prentend,” there is none of that. Instead, the guys behind MGMT continue to explore more psychedelic sounds and pretty much do whatever the heck they want on this interesting release.

Since the release of their breakthrough album “Oracular Spectacular” in 2007, MGMT has been putting out music that gets more abstract with each album and this latest one continues the trend. Fans knew what to expect (or not expect) earlier this year with the release of lead single “Alien Days,” a deliciously trippy and mind-bending rock track. That is followed up with the appropriately-titled “Cool Song, No. 2.” The song goes bump in the night with Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser sounding like Oompa Loompas on acid. “If you think you're free like a kite / Watch it as it flies by,” they sing in a monotone voice. MGMT is certainly free-range throughout.

The only song with semblance to a coherent rhythm is the pop stomper “Plenty of Girls in the Sea.” Because of that it's also the album's best track. Spacey production still accompanies the breezy tune's heavy-hitting beat as VanWyngarden goes on about artistry. “Ah, the passionate painter will say with a brush:
'It's best to accept it and not make a fuss,'” he sings. A catchy MGMT doesn't come without a big message and the band drives it home here.

Aside from “Plenty,” the rest of “MGMT” follows the band's free-range aesthetic. On the cheery electro-rock track “Your Life is a Lie,” VanWyngarden counts the ways in which he considers some guy's life to be a complete sham. They also throw a cover on here, but even that is of some obscure '60s psychedelic track (Faine Jade's “Introspection”). It sounds at home on the weird album, though, and the MGMT really does it justice.

With their self-titled record, the guys of MGMT further alienate new listeners while giving longtime fans something new and interesting to hear. It might not be something a commercial audience wants to hear but that is what makes the band MGMT. VanWyngarden and Goldwasser aren't afraid to experiment and they take full advantage of that artistic freedom. They just happen to be doing all that under a worldwide scope.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 18, 2013, 11:48:11 AM
Chimes


MGMT charters new territory with shockingly raw new album

By Tyler Davis September 17, 2013

After the release of their debut album “Oracular Spectacular,” MGMT was the epitome of the “indie sellout.” The two singles from that album, “Kids” and “Electric Feel,” were all but inescapable. The same could not be said for their sophomore effort “Congratulations!” That album was met with little acclaim from both fans and critics. With their third and self-titled album, MGMT has done something truly spectacular. Rather than simply aiming for the same sort of commercial success garnered by their debut, the band has struck a chord much more poignant and unique, vying for a more psychedelic feel that was only hinted at in their previous efforts. This release has more in common sonically with Tame Impala than it does with indie pop compatriots Phoenix or Two Door Cinema Club.

DARK AND EERIE SOUNDING MELODIES

The album kicks off with “Alien Days,” a groovy track with Andrew VanWyngarden’s floaty vocals sitting atop a wash of colorfully distorted textures. Lyrically, this track hearkens back to the great Pink Floyd, with contemplative lines such as “Be quick dear / times are uncertain / one month crawling / next year blurring / decades in the drain / monograms on the brain / decide what's working and what's moved on to the last phase.” The sounds and melodies used in this record are far more eerie and dark than those found in earlier releases. The poppy radio-friendly sounds of old have been traded for acid-induced sonic journeys deep into the rabbit hole of psychedelia. Even the album’s most radio-friendly track, the single, “Your Life Is A Lie” has been given a healthy dose of distortion.

HINTS OF ELECTRONICA

One of the instantly likeable qualities about this album is its irresistible grooviness. With popular artists such as Skrillex using glitchy electronic drums, we can all too quickly forget the power of the groove, something our musical forefathers such as Led Zeppelin and The Doors knew very much about. While the songs on this album are all sonically similar, the rich textures, effects and nuances save them from falling into monotony. It contains a seemingly endless amount of guitar and keyboard effects, ranging from ‘60s inspired sounds to futuristic keyboard modulations.

MGMT went a direction no one, perhaps not even they, expected. Rather than forcing themselves to write catchy pop tunes reminiscent of the ones that skyrocketed them into popularity, they did something that too few bands are willing to do: take risks — vying for a much less commercial sound in favor of something much more unique and challenging. And in a time when music listeners are far too used to seeing great, unique bands lose their souls for a more marketable sound, MGMT has provided an escape from the endless sea of mediocrity.

 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 18, 2013, 12:01:49 PM
Wow that last review was so refreshing.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 18, 2013, 12:11:35 PM
Wow that last review was so refreshing.

I'm happy to know that someone's reading these  :P
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 18, 2013, 12:13:22 PM
Wow that last review was so refreshing.

I'm happy to know that someone's reading these  :P
Every damn one of them.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: mssaram on September 18, 2013, 08:04:41 PM
Wow that last review was so refreshing.

I'm happy to know that someone's reading these  :P
Every damn one of them.
Guilty as well! I really liked that last article too!..most of it anyway :p
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 18, 2013, 08:35:11 PM
Glad to know you guys are reading and I'm not just post whoring.

I love this interesting review.  There are some mistakes to be sure, but still some cool insights.

http://www.grantland.com/blog/hollywood-prospectus/post/_/id/87469/psych-rock-pacesetters-mgmt-continue-stark-evolution-with-self-titled-third-album (http://www.grantland.com/blog/hollywood-prospectus/post/_/id/87469/psych-rock-pacesetters-mgmt-continue-stark-evolution-with-self-titled-third-album)

Psych-Rock Pacesetters MGMT Continue Stark Evolution With Self-Titled Third Album

It's only been five years since MGMT's debut album, Oracular Spectacular, came out and turned the unknown musical duo of Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser into instant festival royalty. The pair became reluctant generational ambassadors with songs like "Kids" and "Time to Pretend," which channeled post-adolescent anxieties through a golden haze that made them sound downright optimistic, even if perceived idealism was a willful misreading of the fairly grim lyrics, a trick played on the listener with hooks that channeled the childhood enthusiasm for which the songwriters were actually in mourning.

It was an insanely short slope from obscurity to oversaturation for Goldwasser and VanWyngarden, who met at Wesleyan University and were signed by Columbia Records in 2006, a year after graduating college. It's hard to feel too bad for a band that never suffered through even a year's worth of struggle before hitting it big with a worldwide string of hits that garnered fans like Paul McCartney, but let's try. By the time MGMT achieved ridiculous mainstream success, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden had already begun questioning its validity. Was MGMT really the greatest, biggest band in the world in 2008? Or was it just incredibly lucky, in the right place at the right time, with a giant promotional budget from a record industry desperately trying to figure out how to monetize something — anything — off the Internet and make it into a new business model?

These questions have shaped MGMT’s evolution through its third album, the self-titled MGMT, which arrived on September 17. The not-so-long-gone time when "Electric Feel" lit up satellite radio stations every two minutes already seems like the very distant past, but the influence of MGMT’s first album is still everywhere in the middle-of-the-road genre now known as indie music, the platonic ideal of a blog-hyped band hitting it big. Yet even as the influence of Oracular Spectacular lingers heavily, MGMT itself travels ever further away from "Kids" as a sound, a song, and a general ideology.


That shift began with the band’s sophomore album, Congratulations. Having established themselves as the key purveyors of a wildly popular sound and sensibility, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden decided to reject the very style that brought them so many fans and warm accolades. Congratulations was a poison pen note to the neon headband–sporting, faux-tribal hordes that by 2010 had become an unavoidable part of the scenery at events like Bonnaroo and Coachella. MGMT swung from Oracular Spectacular’s winning and crowd-pleasing formula of indietronica pop with a wistfully acid-brained bent, and instead pointed its sound straight down toward the bowels of psychedelic darkness.

The band expressed a public wish not to release any singles from Congratulations, in an effort to get listeners raised on an ADD diet of streamed singles to focus on consuming the album as a whole. For such a distinctly modern-sounding act, this was an extremely '70s idea: the concept album, and the concept is that the album only works as a whole. Goldwasser and VanWyngarden wanted to prove their rock elite street cred, and they did, with songs devoted to Dan Treacy from Television Personalities and to electronic glam spiritual godfather Brian Eno. "Brian Eno" was the heart of Congratulations, encompassing the band's mission to create intellectual but immediately gratifying songs like those on Eno's first three solo albums, but particularly the Roxy Music redolent art-pop of Here Come the Warm Jets and Taking Tiger Mountain (by Strategy), which combined arch-humorous lyrics with complex but catchy arrangements that often break down into searing noise.

The band's wish to avoid singles was overruled, and four songs from Congratulations were eventually released, with only the title track/fourth single bearing even a passing resemblance to the MGMT sound that had been defined and refined on Oracular Spectacular. In place of Oracular Spectacular’s verdant synth lines and spuming grooves, Congratulations found the boys and their now five-piece band crafting flittering prog with Krautrock beats and bongo solos. Where MGMT’s lyrics had been playfully nonsensical, they became increasingly abstruse, although ultimately not too hard to actually decipher. Despite the surrealist veil, the songs espoused a narrative commentary on the ills of fame and the hollowness of success.

It can be difficult to sympathize with the burdens of success, but all of MGMT's lyrics are shot through with the suggestions that Goldwasser and VanWyngarden consider themselves impostors to the throne. When Radiohead eschewed the era-defining Brit-pop perfection of "Creep" for something much weirder and less radio-friendly (if no less critically praised), crop upon crop of band sprang up to take over where "Creep" had left off, making room for groups like Coldplay to assume the mantle that Radiohead had rebuffed. Likewise, in the wake of MGMT abandoning its original sound, a million Internet acts applied the old fluorescent body paint in tribute, signaling fairly obviously that they, too, would like to be world-famous headliners commanding a swooning army of the young and drug-addled.

If Oracular Spectacular was a drug's come up and peak, and Congratulations the inevitable comedown, then the self-titled MGMT is the day after the rave has ended. It's the afterimage of the strobes, the echo of last night's deafening beat cooling down to a thrum, while you search around the room for your glasses, your wallet, your lost serotonin. It's the sound of what it feels like to melt into the rug. As a trio, the three MGMT albums chart the course of the rise and fall of youthful idealism. Hedonism gives way to genuine exhaustion, nihilism, and spiritualism battling it out for your adult soul. MGMT is not all darkness and despair, but there are a lot of hints that this is a breakup album.

VanWyngarden's voice is run through all kinds of filters to sound higher, more watery, more distant. The album opens with a helium gas tweak version of his voice, just to knock you off-kilter and make sure you stay there while you listen through the rest. The most obvious single candidate is a cover of Faine Jade's bubblegum psychedelic pop gem "Introspection," which VanWyngarden sings through a trippy tremolo effect that sounds just like the one used on "Crimson and Clover" by Tommy James and the Shondells. MGMT as hallucinogenic sunshine pop makes perfect sense. Goldwasser and VanWyngarden did once dress as the girls of "Scooby Doo." Maybe they also grew up listening to '90s bands covering '70s cartoon theme songs and internalized the grunge Day-Glo treatment. Currently, MGMT sounds like the Archies on E.

MGMT also calls to mind Steely Dan, a musical duo who met at a small East Coast liberal arts college and cultivated a shared niche aesthetic into a successful musical career. Steely Dan also seems like a band whose mainstream popularity might have surprised its creators, jazz-rock aesthetes who crafted cynical, cerebral songs in complicated, shifting tempos. For jazz-bearded weirdos specializing in doo-wop inflected songs about '70s sleaze, in a band named after a dildo in William Burroughs's Naked Lunch, Steely Dan remains wildly popular on dive-bar jukeboxes, with more than a dozen undeniably great classic hits. Considering the band seems so outwardly and unapologetically weird, Steely Dan has curiously wide appeal with classic rock fans. Steely Dan’s success is a great argument in favor of pursuing specificity instead of attempting to appeal to everyone: By being insanely specific and trying to please yourself, you might please everyone else, too.

Deeply connected duos like Steely Dan’s Donald Fagen and Walter Becker, or Goldwasser and VanWyngarden, manage to take that particular kind of inside joke that exists within friendships, and convey it through songs. You may not always understand what exactly the songs are about, but the ambiguity can be part of the enjoyment. You get the sense that the duos are speaking to each other through these songs, embroidering on a mutual thought or idea, trying to understand it themselves by expressing it together. But go too far inside, too deep into the code without making any openings accessible therein, and a duo risks excluding the audience altogether. Conversely, go too general, and the band might lose the particularity that made it work to start with. (Steely Dan and MGMT also share a genius for writing happy-sounding songs about depressing things.)

MGMT is both the broadest and most specialized MGMT album yet. It splits the difference between Oracular Spectacular and Congratulations, following its own internal logic toward the muted industrial underpinnings of "A Good Sadness," with shades of Depeche Mode, or the skittering anxious drums of "Astro-Mancy," and then down into the Nuggets rabbit hole again for "Alien Days" and "Mystery Disease." MGMT rejects rock-style minimalism in favor of copious studio tracks, all the better to gauze over the raw emotions being sung about in the detached Eno-esque vocal style the duo developed on Congratulations. Seventies concept albums loom large on MGMT as well, in their ambition, scope, and sheer experimentalism.

MGMT is a headphones album in the best possible sense. MGMT is one of a handful of bands, along with Australian psych-rockers Tame Impala, setting the pace for current psych-rock, pushing the genre forward using whatever technology becomes available. Another godfather who comes to mind is Todd Rundgren, the '70s critical darling who couldn't decide if he wanted to make perfect power pop, or soul, or protopunk, or prog rock, or hard rock, etc., so he just made them all. Some people may have thought that was confusing, or overly eclectic, or, god forbid, pretentious. The chaotic folky electronic soundscape of MGMT’s "I Love You Too, Death" is a little silly, but it's supposed to be. It's both the bleakest and most beautiful, blatantly hopeful cut on the album.

MGMT might be missing a "Kids," but it has its very own "Hello It's Me" in "Plenty of Girls in the Sea." While most of the album is devoted to what sounds like a bad breakup — at the very least an existential crisis — the penultimate track is a fairly straightforward rocker that sounds like some of McCartney's solo songs from McCartney II (the amazing 1980 album in which McCartney discovers drum machines and synthesizers). True to form, "Plenty of Girls in the Sea" is an exhilarating song with lyrics that are pretty sad when read in print. At first, the fact that this sounds like a Beach Boys melody run through a fax machine distracts you from noticing that it's an ambivalent song about making peace with being alone, even if you'd rather not. But rather than turning to pleasure-seeking to deal with it, the narrator accepts that we have to "tend to the void, don't just fill it."

Maybe the kids are all right after all.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 19, 2013, 04:43:50 AM
MGMT: NO CATS WERE HARMED IN THE MAKING OF THIS RECORD
http://www.xfm.co.uk/news/mgmt-no-cats-were-harmed-making-record/ (http://www.xfm.co.uk/news/mgmt-no-cats-were-harmed-making-record/)

Xfm
By Chloe Aust, 19th September 2013, 06:00
MGMT have reassured XFM that no cats were harmed during the making of their self-titled third album, which was released this week.


The band caught the Internet's attention back in January when they posted a picture online of a kitten that they claimed had just heard the new record.

It didn't look best pleased.

In an interview with XFM's John Kennedy - which will be aired along with tracks from MGMT on tonight's X-Posure - Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser admitted the record was a return to their earlier sound and has a bit of a feline theme.

"I think the musical focus shifted more to abstract sounds," Ben explained. "Not knowing that a sound came from a particular instrument or that you'd associate the sound with certain memories or whatever.

"A lot of it you wouldn't know where the sound was coming from or how it was made or anything like that. It was more trying to get abstract feeling."

MGMT formed while the pair were in their first year at Wesleyan University in Connecticut and Andrew reckons their way of working on the new album is a return to the style of their college days.

"We would come up with sounds and go, Oh, that sounds like a screaming dinosaur, or something and we'd be laughing and giggling," he said.

"This time we had a lot of moments where we were like Oh, that sounds like a dying cat and now there's a dying cat on the album and I don't think most people are going to know how that noise was made."

However they have reassured XFM that it wasn't actually a dying cat, just a sound effect, but admitted it does appear on "about half" of the tracks on the album.

"If you really want the deepest dying cat track, I'd really play An Orphan of Fortune - it has a dying cat solo," Andrew recommended.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on September 19, 2013, 04:48:47 AM
Ha! That was awesome. Now I need to go listen to An Orphan of Fortune...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 19, 2013, 08:56:16 PM
Star Pulse
http://www.starpulse.com/news/Brent_Faulkner/2013/09/19/review_mgmts_mgmt_ (http://www.starpulse.com/news/Brent_Faulkner/2013/09/19/review_mgmts_mgmt_)

Alt-Rock’s Trippiest Band Keep on Trippin’ Three Albums In…


Juicy J recently released an album entitled Stay Trippy.  True to it’s title, it was most certainly trippy, amped up by its consistent references to the excesses of the hip-hop lifestyle: drugs (lean, weed, mollies) and girls.  Although vet Juicy J does a fine job of promoting continual irresponsibility by living it up and “putting it on wax”,  Alternative rock band MGMT, three albums in mind you, do a superb job with all things ‘trippy’ themselves.  The trippy-ness that is MGMT must be fueled by their love of psychedelia, bright, minimal synths, and almost surely drug paraphernalia (LSD perhaps).  Their self-titled third set both allures and overindulges in its lush spaciness, playing very true to the MGMT script and delivering another fine affair.

“Alien Days” is a brilliant opener that impresses more and more with each successive listen. Trevor Napoli provides a child singing at the opening, which further adds to the mysterious, left-field sensibility of the cut.  After Trevor’s feature ends, a groove helps to add some more ‘traditionalist’ nature to the cut, further anchored by a rich bass line.  The lyrics are incredibly poetic, a trend that dominates throughout MGMT.  Among my favorites? “Numbers can’t decide if the day’s supposed to smile” or the true thought-control playing “Those days taught me everything I know / how to catch a feeling and when to let it go…” Ultimately, MGMT outdo themselves here.



“Cool Song No. 2” has a tough act to follow, but manages to remain consistently strange and creative.  With nonchalant vocals by Andrew VanWyngarden further leading the mysterious charge, the lyrics take on an even more reflective tone surprisingly: “If you think that you’re free (like a kite) / watching as it goes by (spy the unknown) / focus on the quiet oars / tell me how far you’d go (go where you like) / I know your air won’t last (last one to know) / would you feel better holding the stars up…” Heavy stuff, but good stuff.  Plus, the piano adds a nice timbre to the mix.

“Mystery Disease” feels more accessible than the first two.  There is no chorus per se, but the continual return to the titular lyric gives this song a catchiness about it.  Lyrics such as “Floating impatience / snuffs my limited sapience / black smoke as soon as the pressure’s released / deep space sights, the Mystery disease…” certainly allure.  Throw in a minor key into the mix, and that ‘mystery disease’ truly is dark and mysterious.



On follow-up “Introspection”, MGMT feels a bit less captivating than the previous three, but the careful listener still finds plenty to feast their ears and minds into. The ever popular references to religious skepticism and atheism raise an eyebrow on the noble chorus: “Introspection, what am I really like inside / introspection, why have all the prophets lied…” Prophets such Biblical ones? You be the judge.  If “Introspection” left you wanting more (doubtful given it’s consistency), “Your Life Is A Lie” serves up just the right dosage to more than whet your palate. Pessimistic yet centered in a major key, “Your Life Is A Lie” packs a knockout in just over two minutes.  Maybe the best play on words is “Tell your wife / this is your life / you life is a lie / this is your wife / now she knows, she understands / her life is a lie / nobody wins / try not to cry…” At least it’s a pleasing pessimistic song, right?

Good and sad come together to form the oxymoronic “A Good Sadness”, which continues on MGMT’s odd track.  The cut grows incredibly dense and less accessible, coming over as more soundscape by the end than say notable, memorable song.  Experimental, it is interesting if overindulgent.  “Astro-Mancy” sports busy production work, but a persistent rhythmic groove from the start definitely provides the listener with something to latch on to.  Again, poetry drives the lyrics, led by the incredibly clever “For all I know we were sleeping / arranged like Fate’s vain infantry / stacked in unconscious opposition / blind and happy for tomorrow…” Talk about ‘staying trippy’!



“I Love You Too, Death” opens with pervading minimalist ideas – shocker right? Eerie, VanWyngarden certainly paints death with his vocal approach and those top-notch lyrics.  “Cashiers won’t deduct the pain / loneliness sleeps on the couch…” or “generations of defeat / always assuming you’re the worst…”. Ouch.  What makes it even more strange is that the cut which begins so ‘deathly’ off-putting transforms into ‘love’ by settling into a major key area.  Who’d a thunk it?

“Plenty of Girls in The Sea” is much more straightforward than a number of its colleagues, not to mention its length arriving as the second shortest cut.  Like “Mysterious Disease”, there is no chorus, but the titular lyric once more serves as a central hooking lyric.  The best lyric: “The surgeon performs precise little cuts / but he’s never perfect, he’s thinking too much / and it’s really no comfort to me / there’s plenty of girls in the sea…” Closer “An Orphan of Fortune” ends the effort solidly, though not quite as magnificently as it opened.  Still, with plenty of lyrical prowess at work not to mention continually impressive productions, “An Orphan of Fortune” still  seeks some spins.

Ultimately, MGMT is another well-rounded, strange yet captivating MGMT album. Odd, beautiful, oxymoronic, spacey, and left-field, there is plenty of magic to be experienced by the open-minded listener.  It won’t be for everybody, but if you enjoy out-of-the-box music and prefer MGMT on their experimental vibe, then MGMT should please you.  Better than Congratulations? Nah, but definitely worth the purchase.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 20, 2013, 06:45:19 AM
http://www.buffalonews.com/gusto/disc-reviews/discs-mgmt-sings-the-body-electric-tierney-sutton-sings-joni-mitchell-wilford-brimley-sings-standards-20130919 (http://www.buffalonews.com/gusto/disc-reviews/discs-mgmt-sings-the-body-electric-tierney-sutton-sings-joni-mitchell-wilford-brimley-sings-standards-20130919)

MGMT sings the body electric


When MGMT played an outdoor show at Artpark this summer, the “glass half-empty” view of the proceedings might have suggested a psychedelic music stripped of its give-and-take relationship with the audience – a new trippy music for kids, but with the unfortunate aspect of a spectator sport replacing the give and take. Nonhaters might have taken the other view – that here is a psychedelic music very much of its age, and if 16- to 25-year-olds dominated the Artpark crowd, well, isn’t that a good thing? Shouldn’t we celebrate the fact that music of such eccentric and eclectic tendencies is being embraced by a generation that could just as easily be listening to Skrillex and Miley Cyrus? At Artpark, MGMT did with electronic dance music what early prog-rock pioneers did with primitive synthesizers – they toyed with it, and bent it to their will. Such disregard for “rules” is usually a healthy sign in the creative arts.

The problem, if there is one, with MGMT – principally, the duo of Andrew VanWyngarden and Benjamin Goldwasser – is that the group’s 2007 debut effort “Oracular Spectacular” is such an unblemished masterpiece that it has made the two albums that followed it seem like a letdown. So the naysayers inevitably line up and cry foul. (That the majority of these naysayers probably fell head over heels for the first album and are now, OMG, so totally over it, makes them seem far more fickle than the MGMT guys may or may not be.) If MGMT can’t re-create “Oracular,” then they must be a joke, such logic suggests. Early reviews of third album “MGMT” tended to follow this train of thought.

Thing is, MGMT hit with the “Oracular Spectacular” tracks “Let’s Pretend,” “Kids” and “Electric Feel,” three songs that come far closer to conventional pop structures than anything the band did on the rest of its debut, or in the time since. In a sense, they gave listeners the wrong idea about the band. That Artpark show, with its gauzy psychedelia, its blatant strangeness and its druggy underpinnings, was far more like the real MGMT. And so is this new album, which was rather unkindly granted Spin magazine’s “Worst New Music” stamp last week. More fool you, Spin – “MGMT” is a fortifying psychedelic snack, a soft-focus journey through the considerable musical imaginations of VanWyngarden and Goldwasser and their producer, Dave Fridmann. Anyone looking for concise pop hooks won’t find them here, but that’s far from a deal-breaker, as the “otherness” of the music and the litany of compelling sounds that complement the harmonic constructions more than make up for the absence of conventional structure.

The record starts strangely with the aptly named “Alien Days” – heralded by a child’s voice letting us know that “Sometimes the windows combine with the seams” (huh?) and a tune that heads straight down the rabbit hole into Wonderland – and gets weirder. The closest the album gets to conventional pop music is the comparatively sunny single “Plenty of Girls in the Sea” and its much more bleak counterpart “Your Life Is a Lie,” but the tyranny of the catchy chorus and instantly recognizable verse-chorus structure is something VanWyngarden and Goldwasser seem intent on rebelling against. That means pieces like “Introspection” and “I Love You Too, Death” live up to their admittedly esoteric titles and deliver a form of intricate musical freakishness that will make you feel like you’re on drugs whether you happen to be or not.

It all adds up to a fascinating listen for anyone who finds psychedelic music to be much more than a lark – a legitimate form of imaginative expression rather than a fashion statement. It may not feel or sound so instantly identifiable and magical as “Oracular Spectacular,” but “MGMT” certainly obliterates the sophomore slump that was 2010’s “Congratulations.”

My advice? Turn off your mind, relax, and float down stream.

– Jeff Miers
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on September 20, 2013, 07:01:24 AM
I'm glad to see some positive things in here! And, I liked this part: "If Oracular Spectacular was a drug's come up and peak, and Congratulations the inevitable comedown, then the self-titled MGMT is the day after the rave has ended. It's the afterimage of the strobes, the echo of last night's deafening beat cooling down to a thrum, while you search around the room for your glasses, your wallet, your lost serotonin. It's the sound of what it feels like to melt into the rug. As a trio, the three MGMT albums chart the course of the rise and fall of youthful idealism. Hedonism gives way to genuine exhaustion, nihilism, and spiritualism battling it out for your adult soul.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 20, 2013, 09:38:48 AM
“MGMT” is a fortifying psychedelic snack.  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 20, 2013, 12:23:21 PM
http://thetalkhouse.com/reviews/view/khaela-maricich-mgmt (http://thetalkhouse.com/reviews/view/khaela-maricich-mgmt)

The Talkhouse

What is music for? This question maybe seems too massive to be worth considering, but listening to the new MGMT album, my bandmate Melissa Dyne and I have been asking ourselves this very question. Really, why do people make music, and why do other people listen to it? Music is such a weird thing to begin with. As an art medium it's so potent and accessible. People get angry about music. People have sex to it. These days it's rare to inspire extreme feelings with a painting or an installation. Only some kind of art freak would have sex to a painting. A piece of music, however, can move with ease through broad and diverse populations, like a virus, causing all sorts of powerful reactions. Divorced, these days, from even the plastic of a compact disc, the container for music now seems to be the place within a human being where a song is stored and loved and imperfectly remembered. In the brain? The heart? Some other empty space inside of us?
Listening to a new album from a band with whom I have history has the same highly charged lack of perspective as opening a birthday present. As I'm opening the box I'm trying to smile and remember that someone gave me this because they love me, but really I am thinking that this person doesn't actually get me, and if they did they would just give me what I want instead of some shit that I can tell from first glance isn't going to be useful to me. But an album isn't a special present given directly to me, even though that is how my favorite albums feel. An album is someone else's artwork, a snapshot of where an artist happened to find themselves creatively at a particular time.
I am aware that I have written two paragraphs without saying anything specific about the new MGMT album, so let me say that Melissa and I are very excited about what they've made. The long preface feels appropriate, I guess, because MGMT is a band with whom we have some history, and when I say "we" I mean literally just about everyone, as it's basically impossible to find someone in the indie music spectrum who didn't experience the communal infection of their first album, 2007's Oracular Spectacular. I heard "Electric Feel" playing today in an upscale supermarket in Portland and it sounded as fantastic as ever, pumping through the grocery aisles. The songs from that album are so effortless and inevitable, it's like they weren't even made by people, like they already existed as a natural phenomenon somewhere out in the ether and simply needed to be revealed by humans who were paying special attention. That entire album, like the best popular hits, felt like something we'd all been waiting for without knowing it.
In my and Melissa's limited knowledge, MGMT don't appear to be people who ever set out to make the perfect album, or who approached music as a career goal or a potential social passport. The story goes that they were art students in Connecticut who jammed with each other and made some songs that turned out to be amazing, and that when Columbia offered them a record deal they didn't respond for two weeks because they thought it was kind of ridiculous. These sound like people who ventured out on an earnest exploration of the unknown and stumbled into something massive without meaning to.
So the new album: it's wild. If Oracular Spectacular landed squarely in the sweet spot of being the perfect sound of the moment, much of MGMT sounds like it came from another space and time altogether. A number of the songs hit both of us right where we like it — in the here and now. My first exposure to the album was the video for "Your Life Is a Lie." Halfway through, I was so pumped that I ran into the other room and made Melissa watch it with me and we were both thrilled by how lucid and hilarious and heartfelt these brutal lyrics were. The sound is kind of a mixture of '90s contentment and '60s curiosity, and the message comes off without any of the negativity that you might think a song with this title would carry. It feels like a not rude awakening. The video helps bring this across, like a Cliff's Notes to the dense text of the sound. It illuminates the meaning of the song while coloring it in bright tones and an air of cheerfulness. It made us feel like MGMT are people who are making things for all the right reasons.
There are five other songs ("Your Life Is a Lie," "Introspection," "Plenty of Girls in the Sea," "Alien Days," and "Mystery Disease") that are modeled in the pop song format, easily caught in the head and definitely something one could/will hear on movie soundtracks. The rest of the album keeps one little toe in pop while expanding all other limbs into experimentation. In many songs there seem to be multiple planes of sound happening simultaneously, without an obvious suggestion of which one should be privileged above the others. One of the songs sounds like someone recorded an arena concert from a half mile away and then played it back through a boombox; it's called "A Good Sadness." It's like a casual bystander's perception of a washed-out version of one of their hits. I don't totally get these songs yet and I think that's the point.
The thing about making things is that you don't always know what you are making while you are making it. In the best-case scenario, the thing that you are making is bigger than you or your ability to perceive it or conceptualize around it, so you sort of have to open yourself up and watch as the new life forms come out, and trust that the process won't kill you. (Note: just about every MGMT video features beings that look like space creatures and mysterious life forms, sometimes being birthed or exorcised out of human bodies, just saying). When MGMT were making music in a college dorm for their best friends, the prospect of becoming a band that got invited to the Grammys was a bold step into the unknown. They went on to make songs that girls wanted to take off their shirts to at Coachella, and one can imagine that possibly feeling like old news to them now. These guys appear to be sincere seekers, reaching out into wherever it is that the unheard sounds live, in league with all of us music lovers who are collectively trying to figure out where we go next. We are so glad to have them around.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Ryan15693 on September 20, 2013, 01:52:50 PM
It's nice to see some good reviews, judging from the Wikipedia page I had assumed that most of them were less favorable
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 20, 2013, 03:18:29 PM
Just a note, I'm not posting every single interview that I get, just the ones that have something different to say.  I'm getting a little bored with the rabbit hole reference, but it seems to be unavoidable.  Since Andrew has said that YLIAL is the result of an acid trip, we're pretty much going to be saddled with the drug thing.  Andrew in Wonderland.  There's a lot of overlap in the interviews, so I hope I'm not boring ya'll.

http://whatculture.com/music/mgmt-mgmt-album-review-2.php (http://whatculture.com/music/mgmt-mgmt-album-review-2.php)

What Culture

The beginning of MGMT’s third self-titled studio album starts particularly…strange. Andrew Vanwyngarden’s voice is either replaced or modified by or into what sounds like the voice of a young child. It soon transforms into normal pitch, percussion kicks in, heavy and forceful, followed by soft acoustic guitar strumming and that catchy melody that is ‘Alien Days’. MGMT have returned. And it has been quite the anticipation for anyone who is a fan of this band and genuinely appreciated their sophomore album, ‘Congratulations’, which can be argued as an introduction to what has been unveiled as their “true” sound now running psychologically and above all, musically unrestrained in this new volume of songs.

Many things are heard in this album, from Eastern scales to classic synthesizers to cerebral lyrics. Upon listening to it, one might observe that this band once popular for radio-savvy tunes is making some truly artistic music and on a major label recording company. Surprising, to say the least, considering the ever digressing priorities for major labels. Much more to the point, it’s great to see a blown up band pursuing artistic concepts that most all bands would never do, simply for the sake of keeping their devoted fans. MGMT will always be respected for the devotion not to their fans, but to themselves.

‘Cool Song No. 2′ contains the eastern scales mentioned earlier. The melody is quite pretty and is executed with a certain raw quality, making it the album’s juggernaut, second to ‘Alien Days’. The keyboard is brilliantly used in and around the song, as well as the rest of the album, and we hear Ben Goldwasser extending his reach in musical depth, composing some of his best work to date, particularly during the first half of the album.

‘Introspection’ is in itself, introspective, a new quality that hasn’t really been heard by these guys, besides the final track of their second album. ‘A Good Sadness’ also features a certain sound that was foreshadowed in what you hear on the last two minutes of ‘Siberian Breaks’. It’s a very cool sound and it compliments what could be the songs’ notion that the only good sadness is one completely drowned out by technology. ‘Your Life is a Lie’ is an absolute riot, and the most fun you’ll have listening to ‘MGMT’. ‘Plenty of Girls in the Sea’ is the only track that really feels out of place, and although it’s a fun song, it throws the listener off, and because it’s so near the end of the album, the conclusion, ‘An Orphan of Fortune’, the album feels almost as though it ends too abruptly. It’s subtle how the choice in track progression has the ability to affect an entire album.

There are two noticeable differences throughout ‘MGMT’ in contrast to ‘Oracular Spectacular’ and ‘Congratulations’. First, is Vanwyngarden’s lyrics and delivery. Imagine him offering you a red pill or a blue pill before your personal introduction to the band’s music. If you have listened to the first two albums and are now tuning in to this one, consider yourself to have taken the red pill, because he is now showing you how deep the rabbit hole goes. The writing is even more thought-provoking and creative, and if there had to be only one thing to improve upon, it would be the over all construction of the poems. The second noticeable difference is the band’s growth in progressions and subtle textures that truly compliment the ideas being evoked, especially ‘I Love You Too, Death’, one of the albums finest and most quiet moments.

Every song on the record has something unique to offer. Whether it’s the melodies, sounds or lyrics, there is something to appreciate. Unfortunately few songs have all three qualities crafted together to make the album itself as a whole, memorable. There’s plenty of good in this album, it just feels slightly unfulfilled. Still, it’s a highly enjoyable document of a band who blew up suddenly and chose to be themselves afterward.


Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 21, 2013, 06:32:37 AM
http://move.themaneater.com/stories/2013/9/20/album-review-mgmt/ (http://move.themaneater.com/stories/2013/9/20/album-review-mgmt/)

I'm annoyed that MGMT headlined Lolla and I missed it

MOVE

The band’s self-titled album is a tribute to creativity over commercial value

By Patrick McKenna
Published Sept. 20, 2013

Courtesy of whoismgmt.com
(View large image browser)

Full-throttle psychedelic music has the capability of making listeners connect to the sound on an unimaginably concrete level. Equally possible? A listener becomes confused, feels disinterested or even questions the sanity of the artist as they flip to the next song.

MGMT’s newest album proposes this toss-up for fans, and only time will tell if the vibrant journey offered will stand the test against its increasingly large fanbase.
The Brooklyn-based beat masters MGMT have finally returned with their self-titled third album, which has a sound unlike anything they’ve attempted before. Since the release of fan favorite Congratulations in 2010, the band has flourished, headlining major festivals such as Lollapalooza and building a reputation for being one of the best indie rock bands to emerge in the last five years.

Always the psychedelic enthusiasts, their latest craft seems to be testament to the bands growing desire to hold ingenuity over commercial success. With outlandish instrumentals scattered throughout the album, the band has constructed a sound that pushes the experimentation envelope farther than ever before.

Unlike their past two albums, MGMT’s overall sound gravitates away from accessible psych-pop and towards eccentric electronic.

With the notable influences of Aphex Twin and house music matched with what remains of the band’s melody-based psychedelic indie-rock, the album does an excellent job refraining from becoming another toss-away collection of unoriginal songs. Experimentation on high, MGMT comes away with an imaginative concoction of trippy tunes for the trippiest of tripsters (and hipsters).

Beginning with the slow and majestic “Alien Days,” the album’s progression goes from moderately weird to ridiculously wacky. From “Introspection,” a beat-heavy proclamation of individuality (“There's a season when I will find out where I am / And there's a reason, and I will someday find the plan”), to the final four tracks on the album, Andrew Vanwyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, he men behind the haziness, explore the waters of expression through their ambitious desire to sound different.

The album’s pinnacle comes in “Mystery Disease,” a blend of haunting synths that remind listeners of Bowser’s Castle. This song sparks something in the listener that says, “I’m here, I’m weird, but you still like me.” The possibilities of this being the overarching point to this album are as strong and articulate as VanWyngarden’s soothing vocals.

For MGMT fanatics, the album is a wonderful return that shows experimentation and maturity. After a few listens, MGMT will become the latest reason this band is so powerful.

For people who loved the fun melodies of past hits such as “Electric Feel” and “Kids” and are itching for repeats, I suggest you resort back to the lackluster sounds of our generation’s generic pop.

The truly artful form that MGMT possesses will always be there for those willing to invest in something unique.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on September 21, 2013, 01:39:42 PM
I'm really enjoying these positive reviews. I wish people would stop associating the word "hipster" with them, though...LOL
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 21, 2013, 02:36:07 PM
I'm really enjoying these positive reviews. I wish people would stop associating the word "hipster" with them, though...LOL

Hipster, weirdos, whatever.  I mean, basically they're just the nicest guys you could ever meet. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on September 21, 2013, 03:19:45 PM
I'm really enjoying these positive reviews. I wish people would stop associating the word "hipster" with them, though...LOL

Hipster, weirdos, whatever.  I mean, basically they're just the nicest guys you could ever meet.

I like weirdos much better  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Daisy :) on September 21, 2013, 09:23:10 PM
'sings the body electric'

lolololol I stopped reading because I was laughing too hard.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 24, 2013, 06:47:14 AM
http://themusic.com.au/news/all/2013/09/24/mgmt-we-finally-sound-like-mgmt/ (http://themusic.com.au/news/all/2013/09/24/mgmt-we-finally-sound-like-mgmt/)

MGMT: ‘WE FINALLY SOUND LIKE MGMT’

24 September, 2013
Guido Farnell
The self-titled third offering from MGMT takes the fascination for psychedelia that was clearly spelt out on 2010’s Congratulations and mixes it up into a more playful electronic context. As we move across the album from the freaked-out funk of Aliens Days to the drifting, spaced-out vibes of An Orphan Of The Future, the New York duo offer listeners the kind of trip that even Lucy in the sky might enjoy with some diamonds. It’s reassuring to see that major artists can still stand their artistic ground and deliver delightfully idiosyncratic daydreams for our ears.

The idea of releasing an eponymously titled album actually started as a joke. “We always used to laugh about releasing a self-titled album but in the end it became appropriate,” Andrew VanWyngarden enlightens. “It needed to be self-titled because I think this album is truly representative of our sound. A lot of the album was recorded like the music we made when we were 19 or 20 and recording the first album. We had no idea what we were doing and were just making sounds for the sake making a noise,” says VanWyngarden.

As Mystery Disease swirls with synthesisers, the duo start to sound a little like The Black Angels plugged into synths. “It took me a long time to hear a soul or spirit in electronic music,” says VanWyngarden. “I think I have evolved a better appreciation of electronic music. Ben [Goldwasser] has probably become more interested in synths than myself. I guess I am still exploring the possibilities that electronic music offers. I like these little bubbles of atmospheres you can create on a synthesiser that can take you to a whole other world.”
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on September 25, 2013, 03:49:31 PM
I love...love...that. Daydreams for our ears! They definitely found the soul and spirit in electronic music. So good.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 25, 2013, 09:23:21 PM
I read a shit ton of reviews and it shocks me how many "journalists" don't do their research at all and don't realize that Introspection is a cover.

http://www.kstatecollegian.com/2013/09/24/mgmt-brings-back-1960s-flavor-with-eponymous-record/ (http://www.kstatecollegian.com/2013/09/24/mgmt-brings-back-1960s-flavor-with-eponymous-record/)

MGMT brings back 1960s flavor with eponymous record

Joseph Wenberg

MGMT have grown from their dorm room outfit at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. to international stardom.

Everything started with the music of their 2007 debut, “Oracular Spectacular.” The songs “Time to Pretend,” “Electric Feel” and “Kids” brought the record Gold certification from the Recording Industry Association of America and received generally favorable reviews across the board. “Oracular Spectacular” included some elements of psychedelic rock, but had an even bigger emphasis on electronic sounds and synthesizers. MGMT blazed the trail for groups of similar styles like Passion Pit and Empire of the Sun to achieve fame and fans in the American market.

By 2010, the duo had upped their personnel to include a full band, and with consistent cash flow from the success of their debut album, they recorded and released their second album “Congratulations.” This album has a similar feel to “Oracular Spectacular,” although they took the psychedelia and ran with it.

“Congratulations” is rooted in mid-1960s rock. It sounds like something The Doors or The Beatles would have contributed to the musical landscape when they were at the peak of their illicit drug use. “Siberian Breaks,” the second single released to promote the record, is a 12-minute-long cornucopia that basically strings together eight different songs in an unexpected, yet charming style. Songs like “Flash Delirium” and “It’s Working” took from some of the same vibes that were produced on the first record by songs like “Of Moons, Birds and Monsters.” MGMT’s sophomore effort took many critics by surprise, but they were appreciated for being bold and steadfast.

When 2013 rolled around, following the releases of singles “Alien Days” and “Your Life Is a Lie,” from their self-titled third album, MGMT was doing the same thing all over again – taking their psychedelic roots and expanding them to new heights. They released the first single and album opener “Alien Days” on a cassette tape format. In an Apr. 21 interview with Rolling Stone, frontman Andrew VanWyngarden said the song is “about that feeling when a parasitic alien is in your head, controlling things.” That quote may leave you speechless, but the music will also shut you up and keep you listening.

“Introspection” is one of my favorite songs on the record, strictly because it is a staple of the classic rock sound that permeates the entire album. There are some weird synthesizers mixed in and some strange sound effects and reverb, but the effect is delightful. It sounds as if it could have been included on Pink Floyd’s first album, “The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.” The music from this album will most likely make you picture all kinds of odd colors and shapes.

All in all, the record is incredibly well done. I don’t see it breaking too far into the charts and being successful in the mainstream market, though. As far as MGMT goes, they stuck to their guns, and they did an incredible job of it. If you want to take a journey through the parallels of time and space, or if you feel like living the sounds of the ‘60s through a modern band, this is your record. For fans of psychedelia, the record is top-notch. Taking the mainstream into account, however, the album warrants three-and-a-half stars out of five.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on September 25, 2013, 09:25:26 PM
So he gave it a 3.5 after saying good things because he's factoring in what the "mainstream" world would think? Ok then.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 25, 2013, 09:45:58 PM
So he gave it a 3.5 after saying good things because he's factoring in what the "mainstream" world would think? Ok then.

Yeah, most of the reviews I read are the same.  Some of the reviews I post are simply because I like a sentence or two-there's perhaps an observation that I haven't heard before.  I'll get excited and then they get to the second 5 songs and it goes south.  I feel sad for people who are missing out of the second half of the album.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on September 26, 2013, 04:06:07 AM
So he gave it a 3.5 after saying good things because he's factoring in what the "mainstream" world would think? Ok then.

Yeah, most of the reviews I read are the same.  Some of the reviews I post are simply because I like a sentence or two-there's perhaps an observation that I haven't heard before.  I'll get excited and then they get to the second 5 songs and it goes south.  I feel sad for people who are missing out of the second half of the album.

I don't understand this obsession some folks have with them meshing with the mainstream world...
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 26, 2013, 07:33:34 AM
So he gave it a 3.5 after saying good things because he's factoring in what the "mainstream" world would think? Ok then.

Yeah, most of the reviews I read are the same.  Some of the reviews I post are simply because I like a sentence or two-there's perhaps an observation that I haven't heard before.  I'll get excited and then they get to the second 5 songs and it goes south.  I feel sad for people who are missing out of the second half of the album.

I don't understand this obsession some folks have with them meshing with the mainstream world...

We live in a society that, for the most part, judges art by it's commercial success.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 27, 2013, 04:42:55 PM
Street Sounds: MGMT are daydream believers on third release


By Dean Gordon-Smith - Vernon Morning Star
Published: September 27, 2013 1:00 AM
NYC based psychedelic art-rock duo, MGMT pay tripped-out homage to the spirit of Syd Barrett on their third album, the self-titled MGMT.

The 10-song recording, sympathetically co-produced by Dave Fridmann, is a dense sprawl of airy sound that spills over into a hypnotic controlled mess.

The twosome, Andrew Van Wyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, allow entire songs to be buried in all manner of beautifully bent keyboard/ guitar effects. Some tracks will emerge or suggest themselves just long enough for a tune or pattern to become legible (Alien Days) – just long enough for a glimmer of interest to appear.

MGMT is ideally suited for background music – the daydream type. It’s too abstract to get a firm fix on as there’s no boundaries on which to focus. But that’s not the aim here.  One thing is obvious: MGMT isn’t looking for radio play (except on satellite) or commercial acceptability.

They sound like a spaced-out cousin to The Shins or Broken Bells with 1966 being year one.  The swirling sound waves they generate are captivating (Mystery Disease, Introspection) and confounding (Astro-Mancy) but never pedestrian.

The ozone is the destination; sound shaping is the engine; and heavy sound candy is the result.  It is fluorescent cotton candy mixed with some hallucinogenic substance.

They put the p in psychedelic.

— Dean Gordon-Smith is a Vernon-based musician and freelancer who reviews the latest music releases for The Morning Star every Friday.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on September 27, 2013, 10:57:11 PM
Swirling sound waves of fluorescent cotton candy, eh?  ;D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: puredaze on September 28, 2013, 10:47:52 AM
Swirling sound waves of fluorescent cotton candy, eh?  ;D

Arguably the best way I've heard someone describe this band.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Bubble on September 28, 2013, 11:53:46 AM
Swirling sound waves of fluorescent cotton candy, eh?  ;D

Arguably the best way I've heard someone describe this band.

Just perfect.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 02, 2013, 10:14:07 PM
Kind of a quirky little review.

http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-10/rim-shots-justin-timberlake-mgmt-ty-segall-108827 (http://www.wbez.org/blogs/jim-derogatis/2013-10/rim-shots-justin-timberlake-mgmt-ty-segall-108827)

MGMT, MGMT (Columbia)

Though it made quite the splash in 2007-2008, spawning a handful of hits and quickly marking the band that Benjamin Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden formed at Wesleyan University as a staple on the festival circuit, Oracular Spectacular left me cold with its mix of dance-floor grooves and psychedelic tomfoolery. Congratulations (2010) was the thumb-your-nose backlash-to-success record, heavier on the tomfoolery and far lighter on the catchy hits, while the self-titled third album is the one nobody cares about. Yet, confounding expectations, it’s the one I like most. Working again with Flaming Lips producer Dave Fridmann, the sonic pranksters seem to have stopped making noise for anyone but themselves, gleefully reveling in twirling the knobs and working the pitch-shift wheels on their analog synthesizers, dialing up the effects until the needles are in the red, and letting the drum machines run rampant with runaway grooves that are relentless even if they aren’t always comprehensible. Meanwhile, the ghostly vocals echo early Pink Floyd and subsequent solo Syd Barrett—sort of what “Bike” might have sounded like if the madcap had been produced by the Aphex Twin.

Rating on the four-star scale: 3.5 stars.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 03, 2013, 05:07:51 PM
Interview with Ben.  This is google translated.  Not horrible, but still some things lost in translation.
http://www.20min.ch/entertainment/musik/story/20698214 (http://www.20min.ch/entertainment/musik/story/20698214)

You say you tried something "honest to the press to be". What does this mean for your interviews?

We have learned that people often have trouble to understand our humor. We often talk nonsense and people understand that then literally. Therefore we try to be a little less sarcastic ... sometimes.

You and Andrew Van Wyngarden are the creative minds behind MGMT. What happens if you do you differ?

Then there's discussion and of which we had for this album well enough. Eventually, we come but always to a point where we both laugh. We then ask ourselves what actually is to argue about such trifles.

In October you play in Zurich. What do you associate with Switzerland?

Last time it was really great for you. I remember that we were on the river and thought about, reinzuspringen. But then we have not done it, because we thought the water was too dirty.

You have already admitted to experimenting with drugs. Do you do that? Also on tour

I'm kinda over it. Drugs can also weaken the musical performance. For me it's just great today to fully enjoy the moment.

What's going on in the studio?

Since we are only quite sober. Drugs can intensify listening to music though. But I have found that many albums that were recorded on drugs do not enjoy listening.

What is the most annoying thing, make the people during your concert?

On arduous are people who sing our hit "Kids" after each song. But I also can not stand when people record the show on their smartphones. Then keep the whole show on her phone in the air, instead of the whole thing to enjoy.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 05, 2013, 11:19:29 AM
http://obsession.nouvelobs.com/musique/20131004.OBS9852/mgmt-des-acides-et-des-ailes.html (http://obsession.nouvelobs.com/musique/20131004.OBS9852/mgmt-des-acides-et-des-ailes.html)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 06, 2013, 11:11:08 AM
http://www.scotsman.com/what-s-on/music/mgmt-are-done-with-the-kids-stuff-1-3128142 (http://www.scotsman.com/what-s-on/music/mgmt-are-done-with-the-kids-stuff-1-3128142)

The duo that make up MGMT explain why whey are in no rush to revisit the pop hits of their debut album

On the in-car swimming-pool-excursion mixtape, the track of the moment is Daft Punk’s Get Lucky and the improbable fave oldie is Mouldy Old Dough by Lieutenant Pigeon – but the kids still shout for Kids. Indeed, only last weekend my six-year-old son inquired from the back seat: “What’s MGMT’s third album like, Dad? Is it a return to the delirious rush of great pop singles that was their debut – or more of the wilful perversity of the follow-up in which they seemed to hate fame, themselves and their fans to equal degrees?”

Okay, that was me. But not just me, a few others too. Lots of people loved Oracular Spectacular – it sold a million – and were then left confused by Congratulations’ disavowal of sunshiney melodies for a psychedelic exploration. Album No 3 is indeed here, and once again Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden have chosen not to rewrite Kids or Time To Pretend or Electric Feel. They’ve ventured even further into their trippy burrow and they’re loving it down there.

“I’m sure some people are going to make a big deal out of this record,” says Goldwasser when I catch up with the American duo on the tour bus en route to Colorado. “Either they’re going to say we’ve made a brilliant record or we’ve completely ruined our careers. Whatever it is, this time we’ll be prepared.” Last time they weren’t. Not for the acclaim, which was significant, or the backlash, the biggest suffered by any act in recent times.

Now both 30, the pair met at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, which the US likes to call “the coolest college ever”. Time To Pretend was written there, a little brother to Joe Walsh’s Life’s Been Good, itemising the rock star’s rococo lifestyle, but from the perspective of fantasy. As VanWyngarden said at the time: “We were these little guys at a private school talking about owning islands and dating models, and all of a sudden we were playing the song on David Letterman. It started out as a joke and then it wasn’t – or it became this cosmic ironic joke. A year and a half later we were still playing Time To Pretend every night. We had no idea what we were getting into.”

“These songs were happy accidents,” says Goldwasser now. Time To Pretend and the others became summer-festival anthems. He admits, though, that their fantasy included a second act. “We joked about how it would be really funny to achieve that kind of fame and then ruin it in the most spectacular way possible.” The pair didn’t end up hating their monster hits, only that they became monsters.

“We still love those songs and love the reaction they get,” adds Goldwasser, “but if we’d tried to capitalise on their success, to copy them, we’d almost certainly have failed. People wouldn’t have liked that. We’d have got forgotten about.” Some would argue MGMT are set to achieve this anyway, but at least it’ll be on their terms.

Goldwasser recalls them being left “shellshocked” by appearances at awards ceremonies. “People thought we were this thing. We didn’t really feel like that at all.” The duo didn’t approach the second album in the best frame of mind. “We’d never toured on that scale before and struggled to cope with all the attention. We were confused, paranoid and completely overwhelmed. Congratulations wasn’t a happy record, although I still really like it.”

It did, though, reflect who MGMT were; their changing tastes. They’d outgrown the wonky, cheapo, junior keyboard riffs of the hits and started to demand more adventurous sounds from their synths. “Our tastes started to move away from rock ’n’ roll,” says Goldwasser. That music got a little tired for us.” To emphasise the point, when I ask what influences helped in the creation of the third, self-titled album, he mentions films first. “Francis Coppola’s The Conversation, about a jazz-loving surveillance expert, which is a whole movie about sound, and also some Terrence Malick films like Days Of Heaven. But I was listening to some music, mostly punk rock. I got pretty obsessed with the Stranglers.”

Goldwasser says people wrong-footed by the music that’s come after Oracular Spectacular possibly didn’t listen to the second half of the debut, or the 14-minute track on Time To Pretend’s flipside. But he concedes the third album is another kettle of spaced-out fish altogether. “One of the things we tried to do on this album was let ideas have their moment and room to develop. That’s really challenging because it’s very easy to think something isn’t working and put it away. In a way this was like going back to how Andrew and I first played together at Wesleyan, where we’d jam and jam for hours. A lot of my favourite moments on this album came out of us playing these long jams and we’d get to the point where they became a little bit transcendent. Five or six songs developed out of tiny portions of improvisation, although we really didn’t know where the music had come from. In a way it felt alien.”

So: over-indulgence by eternal students or genuine sonic questing? The debate rages. They’re not kids any more and there’s nothing as good as Kids here, but MGMT stay on the mixtape.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 06, 2013, 11:14:41 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 06, 2013, 11:16:10 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 06, 2013, 11:19:30 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr. 
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 06, 2013, 11:23:06 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr.
Wait, from the interview I posted last on here?  I don't see that quote in the interview. Is there another one?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 06, 2013, 11:31:17 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr.
Wait, from the interview I posted last on here?  I don't see that quote in the interview. Is there another one?

last full paragraph
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 06, 2013, 11:32:46 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr.
Wait, from the interview I posted last on here?  I don't see that quote in the interview. Is there another one?

last full paragraph
And there it is.  Wow.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 06, 2013, 11:47:01 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr.
Wait, from the interview I posted last on here?  I don't see that quote in the interview. Is there another one?

last full paragraph
And there it is.  Wow.

What night are MGMT playing in Louisville??
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 06, 2013, 11:50:34 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr.
Wait, from the interview I posted last on here?  I don't see that quote in the interview. Is there another one?

last full paragraph
And there it is.  Wow.

What night are MGMT playing in Louisville??
HAHAHAAAA!!!  I know, I kept saying Thursday.  But it's Friday.  Definitely Friday.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 06, 2013, 11:55:02 AM
I actually read that last night and cringed a few times.
Yeah, ehhh.  It didn't really say anything we haven't heard before.

I did like Ben's quote.  I put it on my tumblr.
Wait, from the interview I posted last on here?  I don't see that quote in the interview. Is there another one?

last full paragraph
And there it is.  Wow.

What night are MGMT playing in Louisville??
HAHAHAAAA!!!  I know, I kept saying Thursday.  But it's Friday.  Definitely Friday.

Just dye it blonde Lisa...that's what I did  :-*
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 07, 2013, 09:11:26 AM
An audio interview http://www.egofm.de/Musik/Musikmeldung/Artikel/1329651/MGMT-im-egoFM-Interview/ (http://www.egofm.de/Musik/Musikmeldung/Artikel/1329651/MGMT-im-egoFM-Interview/)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 08, 2013, 06:23:35 PM
From Agenda (Brussels)  http://issuu.com/brusselnieuws.be/docs/agenda_1395 (http://issuu.com/brusselnieuws.be/docs/agenda_1395)

(http://i40.tinypic.com/9srr0j.jpg)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 09, 2013, 06:37:11 PM
http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsfilmtv/artsvibe/this-band-is-not-for-turning-245745.html (http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsfilmtv/artsvibe/this-band-is-not-for-turning-245745.html)

MGMT’s Ben Goldwasser wouldn’t change a thing. Three years ago he and Andrew VanWyngarden, his musical other half, released an opinion-splitting second album, Congratulations. Angry and obtuse, it was an ill-tempered retreat from the chart friendly swagger of their 2008 debut, Oracular Spectacular. Fans and critics were confused – many loathed Congratulations. The backlash rumbled on and on and, it could be argued, continues to this day.

“We learned a lesson,” Goldwasser sighs. “We are still very happy with Congratulations. Ultimately it’s not a very positive record. We were disorientated and disillusioned — that comes across in the music. A lot of the lyrics are about being in a band.”

Bloodied and battered by reviewers, Congratulations did not sell well and the case can be made that MGMT’s popularity never recovered. The subject is foremost on Goldwasser’s mind this morning as he and VanWyngarden are about to unveil a follow-up. Heavily influenced by late 1960s British psychedelia, MGMT is a fine LP, albeit not nearly as catchy as their early output. On a promotional trip to Berlin, Goldwasser is uncertain as to how it will be received.

“This time around we did not want to write an introverted record,” he says, “We were eager to create a body of work that was looking outward more, that was grounded in the real world. We took a year off and it did us all the good in the world.”

He is right. MGMT is much lighter and less hermetic than Congratulations. However, anyone expecting a return to giddy, glitter-splashed smashes such as ‘Time To Pretend’ or ‘Kids’ may feel let down. That MGMT is gone and isn’t coming back.

“It is not something we are interested in,” says Goldwasser, 30, an amiable but rather wary native of Essex County, New York. “I understand that, for some people, those are the best songs we ever did. We want to try new ideas. It isn’t good to be tied down by your past. I think MGMT is the best record we have made. We are very proud. And I hope it finds an audience that appreciates it as much as we do. It is ridiculous that anyone would compare the music we are making now to what we did 10 years ago.”

Goldwasser and VanWyngarden met in 2003 at Wesleyan College, a preppy third level institution in leafiest Connecticut. From sensible, middle class families they bonded over their shared love of alternative music and fratboy partying (their early press was dominated by breathless tales of naked dorm-room gigs and freewheeling undergrad jinks).

Eventually they tired of goofing around and grew serious about songwriting. When several hissy demos found their way to Columbia Records, MGMT were snapped up. Nine months later, Oracular Spectacular was released, ‘Time To Pretend’ became a monster radio hit, and life was never the same again.

They recorded MGMT in rural New York, at the facility owned by Flaming Lips producer David Fridmann. They’d collaborated with Fridmann previously. “We had never before made the whole record in a studio with him. Dave brings out the best in us,” says Goldwasser. “He encourages us to go in new directions, to not limit ourselves. On the other hand, he lets us know if he thinks we are full of shit. We trust him to the nth degree.”

In an era of plummeting music sales Oracular Spectacular was a notable success for Columbia and its parent company Sony. You wonder what executives make of MGMT’s continued determination not to be a commercial act.

“They don’t interfere, I’m sure some artists are put under external pressure by their record companies. We have always had complete freedom. We’re not interested in hits for their own sake. The idea of working with a big producer would be an anathema to us. It would be like we’d sold our souls.”

You’d have to suspect Goldwasser and VanWyngarden genuinely found overnight stardom an ordeal. Worse than that, as ‘Kids’ and ‘Time To Pretend’ became hits, they started to attract a mainstream following – audiences went to their shows expecting a pop group, not an experimentalist double-act. You suspect it was these people they had in mind when they wrote Congratulations’ most notorious cut: the dissonant, 11-minute quasi-instrumental ‘Siberian Breaks’. It was less a song than an attempt to dissuade the wavering listener.

“The most frustrating aspect is individuals going to the concerts expecting one experience while we are presenting ourselves in a completely different way, ” says Goldwasser. “We see ourselves as a band that likes to take chances and improvise live and not play tracks the same way very night. It is annoying if they just want to come and hear ‘the hits’ and won’t tolerate a noise jam in the middle.

“‘Kids’ in particular was a tune we used to play in college to 30 people. For it to go from a song nobody heard, a song nobody judged us for, to a piece of music fans felt they had ownership over and that we were defined by was extremely strange. On the other hand, we understand a lot of people wouldn’t have heard of us it wasn’t for it.”

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 09, 2013, 08:25:50 PM
http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/reviews/music/37228/MGMT-MGMT (http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/reviews/music/37228/MGMT-MGMT)

by Edward Sharp-Paul

Mon 7th Oct, 2013 in Music Reviews

Culled from endless hours of studio jamming, the songs that comprise MGMT’s third, self-titled album belie the method of their creation by sounding just like the Brooklyn duo always sound – pop songs, smeared with a layer of proggy, psychedelic sludge. In this, way, MGMT is a revelation.

Having courted one of the biggest backlashes I can recall with “difficult” second album Congratulations, MGMT proves that MGMT aren’t just toying with us, that there is a characteristic tone embedded in their work, regardless of the superficial fluctuations that caused all that angst. What I’m trying to say is that MGMT combines the expansive sonics of Oracular Spectacular with the thorny, complex songcraft of Congratulations, and the hooks that have been there all along. The result is a very good album, albeit one that might take a good dozen listens to get one’s head around.

While the acerbic ‘Your Life Is A Lie’ and ‘Plenty Of Girls In The Sea’ give up their peculiar charms fairly easily, the best moments, like ‘Alien Days’ and ‘Mystery Disease’, come a little slower. Possessing a seemingly bottomless textural depth, they recall Syd Barrett in their intermingling of the childlike and the sinister – though with filtered, bad-acid synth tones instead of acoustic guitars – with sing-song melodies floating above shape-shifting, disorienting arrangements, and producer Dave Fridmann’s trademark booming drums.

The overriding sense is not that MGMT are figuring out their strengths – they’ve always been apparent – but that they’re figuring out how to balance them for maximum effect. MGMT is the work of a pop band, but one that’s never happier than when they’re burying their pop just out of sight.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 09, 2013, 08:42:49 PM
I don't feel that it's right to post a partial review.  That being said, please forgive the ignorance of the author's opinion of Congratulations.

MGMT: MGMT
by Joshua Levine
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MGMT: MGMT
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Brooklyn duo MGMT showed up too late in the electro revival to be considered artistically important. But their debut album, Oracular Spectacular, and its trifecta of hit singles were as perfect as pop music got in 2008. Nevertheless, the group was unhappy with their perceived insignificance and returned in 2010 with Congratulations, either an ill-conceived attempt at credibility or a grand prank on MGMT's pop fans. Neither explanation made the record successful, resulting in one song worthy of their debut, the gorgeous title track. The rest of the album was bloated prog rock, and profoundly boring.

MGMT splits the difference between their first two albums by combining the song craft of Oracular and the experimental instrumentation of Congratulations, along with its song-cycle feel. This album is a sleeper; it lures you in gently and ends up being a place worth staying. "Alien Days" begins at a leisurely pace, dynamically building intensity until its winding, whimsical melody sticks. "Cool Song No. 2" follows in the same formula, as does the slightly menacing "Mystery Disease."

The laid-back moodiness ends with the single "Your Life Is a Lie," which is innocuous and vapid on its own, but in the context of the album, its short electro punk blast is climactic and exhilarating. Then the cycle restarts. "Astro-Mancy" and "I Love You Too, Death" are unsettling paranoia drones, while the glam slam "Plenty of Girls in the Sea" repeats the trick of "Your Life Is a Lie." While MGMT isn't a masterpiece, it is a triumph, and after Congratulations, that's more than enough.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 11, 2013, 08:40:15 AM
http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/entertainment/music/9267428/MGMT-MGMT (http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/entertainment/music/9267428/MGMT-MGMT)

It's been acclaim all the way for MGMT, who've managed an intelligent balancing act with that difficult beast known as psychedelic rock.

Their previous release, Congratulations, let them blow off some steam; this one veers back towards tie-die territory, jumping right into the deep end with the lysergic swirl of Introspection and the smothering synths of A Good Sadness.

They sound like they've been self-consciously swotting up on hippie folk in Alien Days, and Mystery Disease has all sorts of bells and whistles.

But they still have one eye firmly fixed on rock, which helps to keep things disciplined, from the steely Your Life Is A Lie to the silky dark spaces of Astro-mancy, and they even have enough confidence to attempt something like the ticking, groaning menace of I Love You Too, Death.

Best tracks: Introspection, I Love You Too, Death.

- © Fairfax NZ News
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 11, 2013, 12:51:41 PM
http://svenska.yle.fi/artikel/2013/10/11/mgmt-more-g-strings-more-trouble (http://svenska.yle.fi/artikel/2013/10/11/mgmt-more-g-strings-more-trouble)

I'll leave the translation up to you.  But I like the play on MGMT standing for More G-strings More Trouble.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 13, 2013, 03:34:46 PM
The google translation of this one is horrible but if you'd like to try...

http://blog.xoxothemag.net/post/63638871974/mgmt (http://blog.xoxothemag.net/post/63638871974/mgmt)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 13, 2013, 04:45:22 PM
Lots of details on their recording gear and the whole recording process. I know it's hard to see it here so you can read it better in the link starting on page 16.  http://issuu.com/franciscojgp/docs/electronic_musician_november_2013 (http://issuu.com/franciscojgp/docs/electronic_musician_november_2013)

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Insert:
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Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 14, 2013, 11:09:27 AM
Audio interview w/Andrew https://soundcloud.com/radiocittadelcapo/mgmt-intervista-interview/s-Kfc60
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on October 23, 2013, 10:35:09 PM
Audio interview with Andrew and Ben for BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/c485632c-b784-4ee9-8ea1-c5fb365681fc (http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/c485632c-b784-4ee9-8ea1-c5fb365681fc)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 14, 2013, 03:53:22 PM
(http://www.undertheradarmag.com/i/logo.jpg)(http://www.undertheradarmag.com/uploads/article_images/MGMT_Interview_Under_the_Radar_Double_Page_MGMT3cmyk.jpg)
MGMT
Fated to Confuse
Nov 14, 2013 By Matt Fink Photography by Ray Lego    ISSUE #47 - SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2013 - MGMT
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"This is our decision/To live fast and die young/We've got the vision/Now let's have some fun." Those words, taken from MGMT's 2008 breakout single "Time to Pretend," have become a rallying cry of sorts, a party-'til-you-die anthem for people who want to dream big and party defiantly. Written by multi-instrumentalists Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser while they were seniors at Wesleyan College in the early 2000s, the song appears on the surface to be poking fun at a checklist of rock star clichés—the girls, the drugs, the money—and the realization that such a life of excess was only a fantasy, that they were "fated to pretend" that it could ever be theirs. Read deeper, though, and perhaps the song isn't about rock star wannabes and their unattainable daydreams as much as it is about two college kids making fun of people who would want such a life in the first place, a satirical swipe at those who want to live (and die) a cliché. Maybe the song isn't serious at all. Maybe the song is a joke.

Whatever their intentions, the reality is that, in a spooky self-actualization kind of way, "Time to Pretend" came true. MGMT did become rock stars, selling two million copies of their debut full-length (2007's Oracular Spectacular) while they dated models, did drugs, toured the world, and managed to have an indecent amount of fun without dying young. But if the song was prescient in envisioning where the band was going, it didn't anticipate the part where the now-successful rock stars had to make a second album, 2010's Congratulations. Nor did it imagine that second album pissing off a large portion of the band's fan base, puzzling many critics, and taking a commercial nosedive after a strong opening week, its focus on experimentation and sonic exploration frustrating those who wanted more radio singles. If "Time to Pretend" was at least partly a joke, some saw Congratulations as the punch line. And some started to think that MGMT had such a lust for the reckless self-destruction expressed in that song that they were intentionally throwing everything away.

"I'm sure that's what some people were thinking about," admits VanWyngarden. "At some point in college we would joke about this big fantasy of getting as popular as possible and then destroying it in this bombastic and crazy fashion. Even if it was a joke, that little seed of a fantasy, some people would pick up on that and see us putting out an album like Congratulations as fulfilling that kind of prophecy. That was the twisted part, like, 'No, actually this is the first time we've sat down and made music that we feel is like a really honest and deep and personal reflection, and it's more of an artistic statement than we've ever made before.' But the good thing from all of that worry and woe is that in the end, we were able to come out of it proving ourselves as a band that is not going to be so easy to categorize or fit into any specific sound or style. And the reward of the fight was to allow ourselves as artists to have more freedom and do whatever we want. I mean, why wouldn't we want to fight for that?"

The fight did not end with the mixed reception of Congratulations, however. Where "Time to Pretend" couldn't have anticipated the struggle of delivering a successful second album, it also didn't predict that MGMT would arrive at a point where their third album would have so much hanging on it, positioning them at a creative crossroads that would either push them back towards their crowd-pleasing anthems of their debut or push them deeper into the creative weeds. With MGMT, they double down on the latter.

"Andrew and I were talking about how everyone that we played it for at first was really into it, but they were also saying, 'Wow! This is the best record that you've made so far, but you need to write a hit or something that people are going to grab onto,'" says Goldwasser on a sunny Santa Monica morning, a few hours before he has to board a flight to Milwaukee for the band's appearance at a festival. "And, at first, we were thinking maybe they were right. Maybe we do need to do that. But then at a certain point we realized that maybe we didn't need to do that, because so far everyone we've talked to has liked it. I think it's more that people are thinking about what other people are going to think, but I don't know who those other people are. For us, we made a record that we're really proud of and that we think is really accessible, even if it doesn't have obvious hit songs on it."

That might be an understatement, as apart from trippy space-rock of first single "Alien Days," it's hard to imagine any of the 10 songs on MGMT having any future on Top 40 radio or in a TV commercial. If Congratulations was daringly experimental, especially for a band that had a lot to lose, MGMT is the sound of a band that has weathered those losses and is ready to roll the dice on what they have left. Built out of hundreds of hours of improvised studio jams and abstract song fragments, it's an entrancing, often confusing, and ultimately rewarding song cycle—if you have the time (or patience) to peel back its layers of content. Though it is largely electronic, it is not exactly an electronic album. Often surreal and hallucinogenic, it's not exactly a psychedelic album, either.

"I try not to read too much press, because I get self-conscious, but I was quoted as saying it's not a record that people will understand the first time they hear it," Goldwasser explains. "And I feel like that's a horrible context to put that in, because it makes it seem pretentious in some way. But I believe that's true; I don't think it's possible to really understand it the first time, but I think that's because it changes every time you hear it. It's not like there's this moment where it's like, 'Aha! I get it.' It's more like it takes some time to appreciate what's going on."

The question, then, isn't whether MGMT have made their most visionary and challenging album—they have. The question is: will anyone other than their most ardent fans be up to the challenge?
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Every Stranger Is A Ghost
Andrew VanWyngarden is back at the hotel after a rainy sound check in Milwaukee, asking whether it's safe to eat a steak that he forgot to put in the refrigerator the night before. The hotel, VanWyngarden says, is  rumored to be haunted, though he doesn't seem to be particularly concerned. "There were a couple of channels on the TV that were crazy, like melting and psychedelic, but I don't think that had anything to do with haunting activity," he says between bites of rib-eye. "I think it was just a bad satellite signal."

VanWyngarden says he doesn't believe in ghosts, but the album he just made is a haunted, if not spooky, release. The textures are kaleidoscopic, spectral synthesizer lines stacked on top of each other in a blurry smear of sonic colors. The rhythms are hypnotic and trancey, with multiple time signatures intersecting in small and barely perceptible ways. VanWyngarden's writing, too, has an eerily existential quality, ditching the winking satire and pop culture references of past releases in favor of ruminations on death ("I Love You, Too, Death"), examinations of drug addiction ("Mystery Disease"), and critiques of unexamined lives ("Your Life is a Lie"). Throughout, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden are the ghosts tangled in the buzzing and whirring machines, the latter's vocals floating just above the fray, stoic and distant, tracing the outline of each song's subtle melodic shifts. But if the album ended up taking them into unfamiliar territory, it started where the others did, right at home.

Beginning work as a duo in their Brooklyn studio in late 2011, VanWyngarden and Goldwasser started writing as they had done before, building songs off of chord progressions and riffs. Soon, they had the album's first single, "Alien Days," a track which sounds like the culmination of their other albums, a surreal space-rock epic complete with darkly theatrical choruses swirling around sighing, sing-songy verses that VanWyngarden says tell the tale of a "less sinister-type parasite" that controls human behavior. But other songs written through that conventional process lacked the spark they were seeking and were soon abandoned. Further conversations about possible directions for the album yielded no consensus. So, in lieu of having a clear direction, they simply began making music, compiling hours and hours of improvisation—some melodic and pretty, some harsh and dissonant, none of it structured—in hopes that something would provide a clear direction in which they could channel their creative energy. Free from the conventions of writing songs based around verses, choruses, and bridges, they found their new ideas were odd and exciting in a way that they hadn't been since they started the band nearly a decade earlier.

"And then there was a moment when I was thinking, 'Wait a minute. It's not like this is this other thing that we're doing, and then we're going to go write some songs. This is way more fun and exciting than trying to be all stiff and methodical about the whole thing. We should just enjoy it,'" Goldwasser says of their soft-focus jam sessions. "We didn't really know when we started working on the album, because we thought we were just having some fun in the studio and that it would turn into something else, and before we knew it we had already recorded a lot of the music on the album."

So even if they didn't know exactly what album they wanted to make yet, they knew how they wanted to make it, and they soon packed up their gear and headed to producer Dave Fridmann's Tarbox Road Studios in upstate New York. Having recorded Oracular Spectacular with Fridmann back in 2007 (as well as having him engineer Congratulations), VanWyngarden and Goldwasser had someone who could help them bring some order to what was becoming a wholly unwieldy collection of sounds. With so much material to sort through, what did they hope to find?

"It's not going to help clear that up, but they wanted to be able to surprise themselves," Fridmann says in answer to that question. "They're both excellent traditional musicians. You could say, 'Okay, here's a chart,' or 'Here's how the song goes. Follow the changes. Go!' And they'd just be able to pick it up and play. It wouldn't be any big deal. And on any instrument—they both play drums, they both play the keyboards, they both play the guitars. It doesn't matter. So it's hard to surprise yourself if you're in that position. So that was really the key to them in the creative process—somehow backing into something that was like, 'Oh. Well, I didn't know that was going to happen. I never could have imagined that you'd play that chord before the chord I'm playing. Now we're playing all 12 notes at once, but I like it. Let's go!'"

Though VanWyngarden and Goldwasser are quick to acknowledge they are very different people both in and out of the studio, they appear to share the common goal of reaching their listener through the art of surprise. Just as they are opposites in physical appearance, they are also opposites in conversation. Charming, distractible, and often flashing a mischievous sense of humor, VanWyngarden is a natural entertainer, charismatic, and engaging. He is also prone to occasionally saying things he probably shouldn't, such as when he, apparently jokingly, suggested in a 2010 interview with Scottish newspaper The Daily Record that Columbia wasn't pleased with MGMT's dwindling record sales and would be more involved with their future creative decisions. (Not true, he says, noting that the label has been unfailingly supportive and immediately loved the new record.) Goldwasser, on the other hand, is focused, polite, and extraordinarily careful, answering nearly every question with a humble "I don't know" before offering a succinct elaboration. In conversation, they make an odd pair. In the studio, their personalities balance each other in ways that allow them to pull in different directions but to ultimately wind up at the same end point. Fridmann got to see that relationship work itself out in real time.

"In terms of what is currently interesting them, Ben is obviously very focused on the technology component of it, and Andrew is focused on just the feel part of it more than anything else," Fridmann explains. "It's great, because they also work in a wonderful way of complementing each other. If we're looking at a technical problem, Ben will be like, 'Well, I know how to get this sound. I need to do this, that, and the other, and then we'll be in the right place.' But knowing all the technology doesn't necessarily mean you'll find the right sound, and Andrew will come over and hit 10 switches that you're not supposed to touch and be like, 'Wait. That gives me a new idea. Let's try this other sound!' And they'll go off in some other direction. That same goes for Ben. Andrew will be sitting there going, 'I don't know. It just doesn't feel right!' And Ben will come up with, 'Well, see, we just need to do this chord and that chord, and now we've got a progression that travels through there and makes the melody make sense.' And then we're onto it."

In that way, MGMT is the sound of Goldwasser's head and VanWyngarden's heart combining to create something that is both cerebral and impulsive, engaging and often bewildering. Hearing them describe it, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden appear confident that, quirks and all, listeners will accept their new album for what it is. Unfortunately, they thought that the last time, too.

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We Like To Watch You Laughing

In the summer of 2009, MGMT were on top of the world. They had opened shows for everyone from M.I.A. and Beck to Radiohead and Paul McCartney, adding each of them as fans in the process. They had toured around the world, earned Grammy nominations, and were knee-deep in their sophomore release, recording in Malibu with Spaceman 3's Pete Kember, a hero of theirs. For a band that had three years earlier been more or less defunct, it was a stunning change of luck. And VanWyngarden knows the exact   moment that their luck began to turn.

"It was a headline of an article," he says with a sigh. "We hadn't even finished the album yet, and it was an in-the-studio preview piece in Q Magazine in England. And they had done some phone interview with us, and we were still writing the album, so there are times with any artist when you're in the studio and all you're really doing is listening to it and making it up, you're not sure if it's good or bad or what it sounds like or what people are going to think about it. I think that's good and healthy to have that feeling, but it's not the best feeling to try to describe to the journalist from England. So here we are on the phone, and he's asking us about our new album, and we're like, 'Oh, I don't know. We can't tell. Maybe it's terrible.' And when they wrote the headline of the article, the title was 'MGMT: How is your new album? "Terrible."' And from that moment, it set everything in motion, every magazine running with this whole idea that we were trying to intentionally destroy our fan base or that it was a 'fuck you' to somebody. Just watching that unfold was not fun for us."

Generally, there were three kinds of responses to Congratulations. First, there were those who were either confused or disappointed, many of them fans and music critics who had championed the band, all of them lamenting the fact that MGMT hadn't written any pop hits on the level of "Time to Pretend," "Kids," or "Electric Feel." Second, there was a smaller (or perhaps less vocal) group who liked Congratulations from the start, praising it as a refinement of the psychedelic half of Oracular Spectacular and a boldly weird step for a band that could have cashed in on their reputation. Then there was a third group, made up of those who didn't really know what to make of the album but ultimately listened to it enough that they eventually appreciated its eccentricities. Listening to VanWyngarden and Goldwasser, one gets the impression that this response was the most satisfying. Still, as much as it has been speculated that they welcomed the criticism that greeted Congratulations, it's apparent that the backlash stings, even today.

"I think it was a pretty obvious reflection of how the world is," Goldwasser says, "and the people with the loudest voices during that time were the people who were being snarky and complaining that we didn't write another 'Kids.' You know, whatever. We know a lot of people got the second record and got really into it. I guess it was just a learning process for us. At first, it was really disappointing, and we didn't really understand why so many people were saying negative things. But we learned to shut that out, and after a year a lot of people came around to it and started saying really nice things about it. I feel like at this point we've learned not to care too much about that stuff."

The fact that the album sold only one-third as many copies as Oracular Spectacular in the United States attests to the damage done through mixed reviews and negative word-of-mouth. But if Columbia Records was disappointed, they can't say they weren't warned that MGMT wouldn't be interested in remaking Oracular Spectacular over and over until no one wanted to hear it anymore. In fact, when they were signed to a record contract on the strength of their first two EPs, Goldwasser and VanWyngarden told the label just that.

"We were very adamant about that, even then," VanWyngarden says. "Because we knew. We weren't that dumb. We knew that they liked 'Kids' and 'Time to Pretend,' and they knew they had a chance to be popular songs, but even then, in 2006, it was three or four years after we'd written those songs, and we'd already gone through college, where they were minor on-campus popular tracks. We were already over those songs, and we were trying to convince our A&R woman not to put 'Kids' on our first album," he says, laughing. "That gives you a bit of an idea of why the negative reaction to the last album was frustrating for us, because we were pegged from the get-go as electro-pop, and I don't think we'd ever want to deny that portion of our fans or that it's part of us, because it's a major part of us. We appreciate that side, too. But even the first meetings with the label, we were like, 'Are you sure? You know, we're going to make some weird psychedelic prog-rock sounds.'"

Though both VanWyngarden and Goldwasser are careful not to portray any of their early singles as stylistic outliers rather than the songs that they are still most associated with, the college kids who wrote those songs bear little resemblance to the 30-year-olds who made MGMT. In fact, listening to the band's evolution, one has to wonder if the band that made those seminal tracks was ever really the band they wanted to be. Ask them what drew them together in the first place, and they both point to their mutual love of music, an appreciation for the outdoors, and a shared sense of humor. Put two of those three things together, and you get the early MGMT tracks. But were the songs jokes?

"Not jokes. 'Jokes' is the wrong word," VanWyngarden says, correcting himself for using that word moments earlier. "For instance, 'Kids.' Ben wrote the music for that one on his own, and he told me he was out at a party at college and came back to his dorm room and was a little drunk and wrote that song and the music as a joke to himself, like 'What's the stupidest pop progression I can think of?' And then he played it for me, and I wrote lyrics really quickly, and we performed it on my birthday when I turned 20. And the first time we played it, we put a section in the middle that was an extended instrumental section that sounded a lot like 'Jump' by Van Halen or something like that. And we put in these sound effects of ice hockey, so it was ice skates slashing along and pucks and crowds cheering, and in the middle of the song we got hockey sticks and a hockey puck and went and played in the crowd. You couldn't really call it a crowd. I think it was six or seven people. So that's the kind of stuff we ended up doing a lot in our live performances in college."

VanWyngarden's tone brightens when telling these stories, and it's obvious that he has a lot of them. How about the first time he and Goldwasser performed together in public, clearing the room of all but one audience member with a 45-minute version of the Ghostbusters theme song? Or the time he and Goldwasser, then freshmen, had the audacity to disrupt a dorm talent show by secretly recording another band as they played, and then using their keyboard amp to blast that band with manipulated versions of their own music while they were still onstage? Or how about the story of how "Time to Pretend" was originally entitled "The Mantis Sailing Home," a tribute to a pet praying mantis whose eggs hatched and inundated VanWyngarden and his roommates with hundreds of baby mantises? Then called "The Management," they were performance artists as much as musicians, and the world was ripe for their satire.

"I don't think we were trying to be GG Allin provocative or anything like that," Goldwasser says, "but I think we really enjoyed playing pop music in order to make fun of pop music, and at the same time, we love pop and appreciate it and love dance parties and whatever. But a lot of the willfully stupid elements of pop music are really funny and fun to poke fun at, and I don't think there was a moment when we decided to become a serious band or something like that. But I think we did get a little sick of irony and not being able to be totally sincere at any point. I'm kind of bored of music that's insincere. I like music that has elements of satire in it, but I feel like you can have that even though you're getting at something real and sincere. I think it was kind of surprising to us that a lot of people didn't get the joke. 'Time to Pretend,' which is definitely not a song that's advising people to forget about the world and party all the time, became known for that. That wasn't necessarily the message that we were trying to express."

That said, even if VanWyngarden and Goldwasser weren't writing joke songs, they also weren't thinking of MGMT as a serious project quite yet. By 2005, they had graduated college, had released two EPs, and had toured as an opening act for of Montreal, but just a year later they were on an unofficial hiatus with no plans to make any more music. Having relocated to Brooklyn, VanWyngarden was writing songs with of Montreal frontman Kevin Barnes and had essentially joined his band as a guitarist, even going so far as to do press photos with them for an upcoming tour. Goldwasser wasn't doing music at all, having decided to pursue a career in social work, setting his eyes on relocating to New Orleans. Then Maureen Kinney, an A&R rep at Columbia, was given a copy of their Time to Pretend EP and emailed the band to express her desire to offer them a contract. VanWyngarden, thinking it was spam, deleted it.

Luckily, the band's manager received a copy of the email as well, and alerted VanWyngarden that it was actually real, leaving him to begin the process of tracking down Goldwasser to convince him to give music another shot. After persuading Goldwasser that a major label contract was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, he reluctantly returned. But there was one final issue to deal with: there was already a band called "The Management."

"And that was the first moment that we had to behave like an actual band, because legally we couldn't have the same name, so we had to think of ourselves like a real band," VanWyngarden says. "With the name change came this rush, especially once we were signed to Columbia and we were writing songs for our first album, and we had to think of ourselves as a band. We couldn't write a whole album of joke songs, so that's when we started transitioning into what music we would really want to make and play for people. That was a big turning point."

Now a real band, the newly christened MGMT took their major label money and headed to Dave Fridmann's studio in the spring of 2007, giddy to be working with the legendary Flaming Lips and Mercury Rev producer. At first hesitant to put those future hit singles on the album, they ended up building the rest of the album around more distorted versions of them, writing a new batch of songs that would begin the shift from college pranksters to burgeoning psych-pop auteurs.

"What I always find humorous is that what people think Oracular Spectacular isn't what Oracular Spectacular is," Fridmann says. "That is not a dance record. That is not a club record. That is not a dance band or an electronic band. Those songs have tons of big distorted drum kits on them. That is not club music. People got this idea of what it is, but they're not listening to it. I still get people who come in and say, 'Make it sound like MGMT' and I'll start distorting stuff, and they'll say 'What are you doing?' Well, did you listen to the record?"

As we know, Oracular Spectacular blew up in the way few albums do, selling two million records and positioning MGMT at the odd intersection of mainstream pop ubiquity and hipster chic. By the time they got around to writing their follow-up, they decided to work as a full band, bringing their touring group into the studio for an album that was both a daring exercise in art-rock extravagance and a weary assessment of their lives as rock stars. But having had so much success in such a short period of time, they had forgotten their warning to Columbia a few years earlier. Congratulations was that weird prog-rock album they had once promised they'd make, but they no longer remembered why such albums carry a risk for both label and artist.

"The second album was the first time that we started from scratch—no songs, nothing," VanWyngarden recalls. "We were going to make something completely new that represented us at the time.... I think we were too far immersed in it to realize that there were things that people were going to react to the way they did. I think that's good, because that wasn't in our heads when we were making the songs, but that also made it rougher on us, because we're more sensitive and we hadn't experienced that yet. We were still writing [the album] off of 2008 and people loving the first album, almost like sailing on this naïveté from college, like, 'We're fucking around and this is great and we can just continue to fuck around and everything will continue to be fine.' And then the harsh reality that some people aren't going to go along with every single whim and whatever you want to do if you're a band that's on that scale. I think that was a tough realization for us."

Before the backlash had subsided, the band had been accused of everything from self-sabotage to self-indulgent pretentions run amok, and the perception set in that MGMT had become drunk on their own sense of creative freedom. Even the album cover—a decidedly trippy image of a surfing cartoon cat who is about to be submerged by a massive wave that is also in the shape of a cat's mouth—was attacked for being silly and over-the-top. But if Congratulations was a divisive release, even though it wasn't a huge departure from what they had done before, what will those same people make of this even more experimental version of MGMT? Could another wave of confusion be building off in the distance, ready to crash on them again?

(http://www.undertheradarmag.com/uploads/article_images/MGMT_Interview_Under_the_Radar_by_Ray_Lego_IMG_7807_1z2CMYK2.jpg)

Don't Expect To Be A Winner

In the history of popular music, there are two reasons to make a self-titled record. One: it's your first album and introduction to your audience. Two: it's a restatement of purpose, a message to the world that this is the purest distillation of your musical essence. Often artists will use this tactic to send a message to their listeners that, even if they've been lost in the creative wilderness for a while, they've thought better of it and they're back to doing what their fans loved about them in the first place. And though they've reined in most of their prankster impulses, MGMT admits that they've allowed themselves this one indulgence: MGMT is self-titled to mock the notion that they believe this album is either definitive or a concession to those who believe they would have been better off churning out album after album of synth-pop anthems. In a strange way, despite sounding little like the band they were six years ago, they're now—philosophically at least—at a place very similar to where they started as college freshmen. They're again making music with the sole goal of entertaining themselves, and they're still into subverting the conventions of popular music.

"I think we're both a little bit bored with rock in a lot of ways," Goldwasser says. "I think there's still a lot that can be said with rock music, but I think people take it for granted sometimes. It's this thing that's always cool, but if you think about it, a lot of it is really not that cool. I think there are still things you can say within that, because there are all these clichés that everyone recognizes and you can use them and make something new out of them. I think that's exciting. But when it just turns into, 'There's this band, and they're a rock band. They do these things, and they're cool because they do these things that everyone knows is cool'—that can be really boring. I'm really tired of that."

To that end, if MGMT is no longer a rock band in any conventional sense, they're in good company. And while MGMT is a decidedly strange, genre-dissolving album of abstracted pop songs, they're only further deconstructing what Animal Collective, Dirty Projectors, The Knife, and a host of experimental electronic bands have done in the past decade. It might not be an album that will make much sense on first or fifteenth listen, but MGMT might sound utterly visionary in five years.

"This new record, to me, is very much a record of the times," Fridmann says. "It has been more clear lately that we're not thinking of music in the same classical, circle of 5ths, music school kind of songwriting. Music is becoming more and more of a different type of tonality that is allowable, and listeners accept multi-timbral, polyrhythmic music and just say, 'Okay, sure. Why not? I like it.' People don't even question it anymore. You can put things that would be unthinkable in music in the past, where you'd say, 'Oh, I'm going to put this chord over that chord and have this giant tone cluster.' So I don't think of it so much as an abstraction or that this is some sort of divergence from music. I think this is where music is going. I think the Western ear is slowly dying, and we are changing. I think they're just on top of that front of strange music—strange new music."

For all the struggles to describe the music contained on MGMT, "strange new music" might be most accurate. Even after a decade of music drifting away from traditional verse-chorus structures at an increasingly accelerated pace, an album as boldly uncompromising as MGMT is still startling. If those aforementioned experimental acts have maintained their audiences and even brought on new listeners, they've done so because their audiences were ready to follow them. Because of their success, MGMT has a different audience, one that they say is getting younger and more open-minded but whose less adventurous members are probably one weird album away from abandoning them. If true, they don't seem particularly worried about that response.

"I think that it's going to be mixed," VanWyngarden says, his tone suggesting that such an outcome isn't entirely unwelcome. "I hate it when people say 'mixed reviews,' because that always has this negative feeling to it. When people say, 'That album came out to mixed reviews,' you say, 'Oh...mixed reviews.' But really, I think that's great. If people are thinking about it and forming their own opinions on it, of course not everybody in the world is going to be accepting and like, 'Yes. This is a great album.' But I think a lot of people will like it. I hope that they find themselves surprised that it is pretty out there and different and experimental, but it's also not that hard to get into it. It's more open than the last record, and I don't think it feels as much like we're trying to prove something or get somewhere," he says, appearing to reach for a metaphor to tie everything together but giving up.

"I'm just totally happy being able to exist on this planet as an artist and a musician and be able to think abstractly and have my head in the clouds. To just do what we do with our new album and our last album and kind of just take risks as an artist and still be able to have a career and survive..." he says, trailing off once he hits the word "survive," as if it has triggered a thought he's going to keep to himself. "I think that's really lucky and cool."

[This article first appeared in Under the Radar's September/October issue.]
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 14, 2013, 08:41:14 PM
http://www.jambands.com/features/2013/11/14/mgmt-from-phish-to-fade-jade#.UoV4y6W9yIw (http://www.jambands.com/features/2013/11/14/mgmt-from-phish-to-fade-jade#.UoV4y6W9yIw)

Published: 2013/11/14
by Mike Greenhaus
MGMT: From Phish to Fade Jade
lala's note:  How does this shit get past proofreading?
 
“I was a huge Phish fan—I was obsessed with Phish. And I remember reading at some point in high school Trey [Anastasio] talking about something he called the “kill mummy” phase—just how at one point he kind of forced himself to break from that and step out and try something else,” Andrew VanWyngarden said in late spring, while finishing work on MGMT’s third, self-titled album. “I think that’s kind of what happened with us on this album with rock and roll.” VanWyngarden has experienced a lot of changes since MGMT released Congratulations in 2010: he rediscovered electronic music, moved out to the Rockaway Beach section of Queens, NY and managed to massage a series of dark, synth-heavy jams into his band’s most psychedelic release yet. Plus, he turned 30 and is in the midst of a “Saturn’s Return” phase of his career. “The kind of mystical side of me thinks that there’s kind of like this development of what it means to be a human, kind of the whole people wanting kind of a medicine band, music to kind of push them and open up different perspectives or whatever,” he muses on a spring day during a series of interviews with Relix and Jambands.com for our July/August issue. “So I think that’s what psychedelic music does when it’s doing it best.” Let’s start with the new album. Can you give us a quick rundown on when you started working on MGMT and how you came up with your new recording approach?All the recording sessions were all up in Buffalo. We did some writing and improvising with these little synthesizer kind of jams that would become some of the parts of the songs at Ben’s house and my old house in Brooklyn, where we used to have a studio. But pretty much every track was recorded at Dave Fridmann’s studio. That’s the first time we’ve done it like that. Dave worked with us on both of our other albums but [the approach was different]. The first one was sort of loose and the second one was sort of mixed recording wise. With this one we recorded every track in the studio and it’s all super well engineered and high quality—as opposed to the other ones which would have tracks that Ben and I recorded with our limited but expanding knowledge of recording techniques. Dave Fridmann also had a bigger role kind of as a motivator and also kind of pushing us to go with certain sounds.In terms of a timeline, at what point did you start sketching up those original ideas at Ben’s house and then start making the pilgrimage up to the studio in the woods?January 2012 is when we started doing those jams in Brooklyn at Ben’s house or at my house. Early March 2012, was the first Taxbox session [at Fridmann’s studio in Buffalo]. And then over that last year we went up there I think a total of five times, maybe six. Some sessions were more productive than others, but it really wasn’t until the last two sessions when we kind of saw it come together as a whole and made sense to us. It was one of those situations where the last song we mixed was the last song of the album and once that was there with vocals and everything, it all kind of made sense as a whole. It was a nice way to end it.You recorded Congratulations with your live band and captured the psychedelic feel of your stage show but decided to revert to the original MGMT duo for your new studio album. Was your initial goal to create an album that was a true “studio project” or did that idea really marinate when you went into the studio with Dave? The only goals we had initially were really just to… We wanted to be a little less inhibited with our musical decisions and just kind of let things bloom and grow a little bit more because we had a bad habit of starting an idea and then just cutting it off. The moments that felt like things were really working together and Ben and I were grooving and feeling happy were coming out of these extended kind of improvisations. We would have drum machines and Ben’s module loop here and synthesizers and sometimes guitars and everything going and sometimes we would be doing it for like an hour and a half, two hours, and then that’s where the meat of the jam would be and we would take those sections and that’s when we were getting really excited and feeling happiest. We didn’t really have a set approach but we knew that it was going to be different.I’m sure that this new approach allowed you to shift your roles a little bit. Yeah, on some of the tracks it was definitely like that. It was much less like, like you said, like I’m the guitar player and Ben’s the keyboard player. For the first two albums, I played a lot of the drum and bass parts, but really Ben was more kind of master of the keyboard and synth area. But we both just love making sounds together even though it is usually a point of contention to the particulars of the sound because we love making weird and original sounding synthesized stuff. Dave was important in that we would kind of do a bit of a jam or get something going and then kind of like laugh and kind of go do something else and Dave would be like, “No guys, you should keep going with this. This sounds cool.” That was really helpful and good. But yeah, I played more synthesizers than I’ve ever played.I actually saw you play synthesizers at that Joshua White performance you guys did.That was kind of like we’d never done something like that before in front of people. But that’s what we do on our own so that was kind of cool. That’s how a lot of the songs came about on this album.Did that Joshua White performance come to fruition because you were kind of working with this template or was it just kind of a great coincidence these guys asked you to do something?I guess it was both. I mean, they asked us to do something and it was early in the year and we were like, “Well, we don’t want to play a full band show but we could do something kind of one-off for this.” And it would be kind of a challenge to what we were used to and we went for it.In terms of the improvisation, I know that psychedelic music has been something that you guys have been interested in for many years, but when it came to actual jams was it more like you guys actually jamming live or was it you were going to loop and Ben would kind of flesh it out or vice versa and then Dave would just roll tape and then focus in on those moments? There were a bunch of different approaches. It kind of goes song by song. For “Alien Days,” that was one of the first songs that we wrote during this writing period. That came more from me kind of strumming on the verse chords on my acoustic guitar, and then going into Ben and we kind of worked out the song, which is way more the way we used to do things. But then something like “A Good Sadness”—that whole song is just a chunk taken from a long jam. All the chord changes we were doing live and then we just kind of arranged a little bit, added a few things and sang over it. Then Dave kind of mixes it. And then something like “Your Life Is a Lie” was much more kind of a spur of the moment, just kind of really quickly done song that we thought was funny and made us laugh but was kind of crazy. So there’s a mix.At what point did you add the lyrics to these jam sessions? Like with the first two albums, it’s always coming last.That said, since this was recorded over so many different sessions, over a chunk of months, did you find there were some lyrical themes that run through all those songs or was it almost like “Alien Days” was written at this point and this other song was written at a different stage, where you were?I think there are some themes. Ben and I kind of started to see the first album as this sort of wide-eyed, kind of naïve, psychedelic fantasy, post-apocalyptic thing. And kind of just like this beautiful energy, and then the second one I feel like was kind of the result of all the touring and kind of us being naïve and not knowing what we were getting into with being a band and touring. The second one’s more of I guess melancholy and looking inside and kind of more closed off and a lot about just being a musician. And so I think we had to get that one out and kind of like therapy, and this one feels much more like kind of where the first breaths of feeling comfortable with the music we’re making and excited about being free to do whatever we want, which is kind of scary on one hand that we’re taking risks. The themes I think were kind of this feeling of being overwhelmed or feeling of a constant chaotic sensation which is daily life in New York or whatever, and trying to make sense of it or accept it or kind of accepting these kind of multiple realities. I don’t know it’s us searching for answers or something [Laughs]. I think we enjoyed finding sounds that were abrasive and putting multiple melodies that you wouldn’t think would go together, throwing them on top of each other and taking the result of that as the sound. That’s something that Dave got really into with us, which I think would be cool if you could talk to him about it because he was always amazed or kind of impressed that we would have these songs where there was… You couldn’t really tell at the end of the song what the chord at any given moment was or sometimes where the beat is but it still made sense and it was still sing-able.I think that’s the kind of angle that he really wanted to help grow and encourage.2013 has been the year psychedelic music returned to the mainstream. Do you think that that’s a result of the fact that people who have grown up with this music have had the opportunity to present this music to a larger audience and embrace it or do you feel like there’s some sort of trend that’s going through, with Tame Impala being on the other side of the world and embracing the same thing too?Yeah, it’s interesting to see it sprouting up simultaneously around the world. I think it’s a combination of a certain group of kids that probably have slightly similar musical backgrounds. I’m sure that all of our parents played classic rock and psychedelic stuff from the ‘70s and late ‘60s. Growing up, that was just a part of our musical knowledge and possibly even some of the last generations of kids that didn’t kind of have that, so I think that’s part of it. And then the kind of mystical side of me thinks that there’s kind of like this development of what it means to be a human, kind of the whole people wanting kind of a medicine band, music to kind of push them and open up different perspectives or whatever. So I think that’s what psychedelic music does when it’s doing it best.You see this in bands like Tame Impala and Flaming Lips, too. Their new album is pretty dark and out there, I mean, just kind of embracing the pretty utopian side of psychedelic music as much as the fucked up side of it.I think it’s interesting from the Relix perspective—being a magazine that was formed as a Grateful Dead fan magazine and obviously has grown along with the jamband scene—that psychedelic music has entered a dark sonic period recently. A band like Tame Impala wouldn’t have fit with the “happy-vibe” of the Clinton-era jambands. Yeah, well not to be too political or social by bringing that side of thing into it but with the Internet I feel like so much information is available, pretty much everything you want to know so that it’s harder for there to be this abstract concept of “the man” that you’re writing songs about so it kind of leaves you. If you’re a psychedelic band that wants to be political, it’s like what are you really going to go into that’s safe?I guess that’s kind of the distilled situationist approach. But Ben and I, and I think the Tame Impala guys too, were definitely were inspired in college a lot by way antagonistic groups like Suicide and Throbbing Gristle and bands that kind of had this sort of kind of like nasty prank side to it or something. I was definitely not like everything is roses, the other side of it.
In terms of the approach, it does sound it’s something that you guys have been building towards for a while. Is that why you decided to self-title this album? Well, just like with the last album, which we decided to call _Congratulations like when we first started touring for the first album. We thought would be funny to call the second one Congratulations, this one we decided to self-title it while we were touring for the last album. And then we kind of just felt like we had to stick with it. But I think it kind of makes sense. It’s like The Band how their self-titled record being their second one versus their first record and whatnot, kind of with that whole arc of a rock band. Yeah, it’s kind of playing with that cliché. I think it’s other bands that have done that too, where their self-titled one is not just like the third or second one. I guess Ben and I were also just like as musicians are prone to do, kind of looking at the careers of other bands and realizing that for a lot of bands that we listen to and love, they put out like four or five albums before they found their sound. But a lot of the times those first four or five albums are the ones that Ben and I are more drawn to [Laughs]. So I don’t know. I feel like Simple Minds and The Cure and R.E.M., it takes a while to crystallize their sound and that was kind of comforting for us in a way. Not that we’re trying to put ourselves on the same level as those bands but just kind of seeing what can happen and try not to be stressed out about it, like a make or break situation. It’s interesting. We talked about the evolution of our generation and where we are now ultimately some of the first people to see rock clichés in bands that were designed to break society’s clichés about how a lot of these groups coming out for independent, less mainstream releases and then they had their big break. R.E.M. had ten years under their belt before they had their first album. There are probably a lot of R.E.M. listeners who didn’t even know there was something before “Losing My Religion.” Have you found that knowing Ben now since you were 18 years old that you guys have evolved musically together in terms of your listening interests? There was a major shift in musical influences for this album. I think simultaneously Ben and I both got a little sick of rock and roll, which if I heard myself say that four years ago I would be like, “What are you talking about?” But it’s true. I think for the first two albums we were listening to a ton of Rolling Stones and Elton John and just a lot of classic rock and I think we just kind of got a little bit over that or something. I don’t really know why. But I think a big part of it for me was in 2011, I finally started really getting back into electronic music and something changed in my brain where I was able to hear like soul and just heart and kind of a real spirit in electronic music which before I never really broke through. And then at the same time when I would try to listen to “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” or “Brown Sugar,” I could only hear something that was tired and really fun. Obviously they had it down, they did some amazing shit but… I was a huge Phish fan. I was obsessed with Phish. And I remember reading at some point in high school Trey talking about something he called the “kill mommy” phase, I think he was talking about Jerry Garcia, just how at one point he kind of forced himself to break from that and step out and try something else. I think that’s kind of what happened with us on this album with rock and roll. I mean and it was probably more extreme with Ben even because he was listening to a lot of this band Denim, which he got really into. Because they have a guy kind of got into this world in the ‘90s of writing songs that were like rock and roll songs making fun of rock and roll. When did you get back into electronic music? I also think it’s important to qualify what electronic music you are referring too because your new album definitely isn’t a dance album it’s more Aphex Twin then say even some of your earlier stuff which has a dance beat to it but was much less abrasive. Yeah. Well, I didn’t listen to electronic music until I was a freshman in college. It really was Ben who introduced me to a lot of music that we were really nuts about early on, like Mouse on Mars and Aphex Twin and this band called Bridge and these more cut and paste electronic groups that I think that was a major influence early on, our love of alien and insectoid sounding synth noises. But then in 2011 when I started getting back into electronic music, it was much more the house side of things. And maybe that was a result of having toured so much that I found listening to house music while traveling was really great because it kind of just got your whole system into this groove and kind of let you get through things. And we were on this tour in Australia that we really felt a little bit out of place on the Future Music tour. But Tame Impala were there too that was like our only friend. We made a lot of friends, it was mostly DJs and electronic guys, but I made friends with a couple people and the last night of that tour, this legendary DJ Spinback, who was on the tour, he DJed at the artists’ after-party and I danced until six in the morning and that was another kind of breakthrough moment where I kind of realized what it’s all about with electronic music and the skill involved with a really good DJ. So then from there… So that was first starting off I was really into this guy Omar-S, who was a Detroit guy, but he’s definitely influenced a lot by the other Detroit electronic acts from the ‘80s, Also, this band Woo was a big influence, they’re not really electronic per say but it’s more like this kind of atmosphere, and then the Orb was probably the biggest… I got really into the Orb. And not to talk about drugs or anything, another major breakthrough for me was like I had just made this playlist one time while I was on an airplane and it had like “Slug Dub” and it had a couple whatever that 20 minute long Stereolab and EAR song and it had all this stuff that I kind of just threw on there, and then I took really good clean acid in Hawaii and put the mix on and like I had never listened to really electronic music while tripping, and to hear something like “Slug Dub,” which just goes everywhere, you realize that’s what it’s meant for [Laughs] and like I know I’m probably like the five billionth person to have that revelation but it was special, you know? Lots of kids have smoked pot and listened to Dark Side of the Moon and had that experience. It doesn’t mean it’s less special. Yeah, I know, I know. It was cool. It’s like, I hadn’t had a moment like that since college so that was pretty cool. Do you feel that drugs do have a role in the creative process at this point, not just for you, but for artists in general? We didn’t really do too much. I mean, we were pretty clean, straight, for this whole session. It was really only one song that I could say was coming from a drug experience that we had up at the studio, that was “Your Life Is a Lie.” It’s funny how these two worlds have kind of come back together in a weird way. It is almost like you have circled back to a scene that was evolving parallel to the ‘90s Phish scene you were part of. Definitely. And there’s a huge, not even in the past five or six years, it’s been a huge growth in electronic music in that underground world. But Ben and I have our own take on it. It’s not like we haven’t felt like we’re coming late to the party or anything. It’s almost like when hip-hop got involved in music in like the ‘80s, it’s so current you can’t ignore it otherwise you’ll sound overtly retro. When’s the last time you saw Phish? At the side of the stage we played before them, a couple of days before them, at Outside Lands. My mom and sister were there, they were at the last show, so Trey came into our dressing room and we all hung out with my family and got our band, we watched from the side of the stage. We had a great time. I’m sure as somebody who grew up with Phish, you know, and I know that you’re part of the wave of indie or psych-rockers who have roots in Phish, it must have been great to have him… I know he teased you guys at one of the festivals, teased “Kids,” has name-dropped you and stuff. It’s pretty epic. Pretty cool. When do you feel you kind of fell out of listening to them? I guess it’s kind of when I got to college. It wasn’t that I turned against them or dislike them, I just, I think in a way my high school musical world was pretty small and closed off. Not that it’s a result of this, but high school in Memphis was much more oriented towards jambands, classic rock, the Grateful Dead and what my sister listened to. It was harder to kind of… When I got up to college, people were playing all sorts of shit I had never heard of so I just ran away with that. Do you have a favorite show you went to? My friend and I did a summer run 2000 on the East Coast and I really liked the Lakewood Amphitheater, Atlanta show and they did a great “Bathtub Gin.” The Holmdel show in Jersey that was really good. But I think the most special show for me was probably when they came to Memphis when I was I think a junior in high school, back in ’99. They played at the Pyramid and it was Trey’s birthday, one or two days after, but the crowd sang happy birthday. It was nice.
You mentioned surfing before. I know you moved out to Rockaway not too long ago, is that because you wanted to be closer to the beach or did it just feel like time to leave the hustle and bustle of Brooklyn and Manhattan? Yeah I guess. I mean, I love my old house but I was going out to Rockaway all the time and I was sharing a room, renting a room out there, and surfing a lot. I told myself that if a house ever popped up in this little neighborhood, this little couple block area where I was spending most of my time, that I would consider buying Actually it was the first time I went out, got my car, and it’s like January, kind of dead of winter, and, I was telling my friend, I’m going to go out and see if there’s any houses for sale. I got out into my car, drove 50 feet and turned a corner and there’s a “For Sale” sign. It was meant to be. I was like, “Yeah!” and I called and three months later, it wasn’t the smoothest sale with the owners, but yeah I bought it and started renovations and then it’s crazy because six months of renovations later is when Sandy happened. So it was a crazy end of the year. But I really like the feeling out there right now. I mean, it’s a little scary obviously but there’s like… I don’t know, it feels really bohemian and I got a few friends who have young kids, and my friend Sarah’s making soaps and my friend Zach has a coffee shop, and they have this temporary dome out there that MoMA built, selling coffee and we DJed in there and I don’t know, it just kind of has a nice vibe that needs to grow a lot obviously. I went there a couple of times last summer just to walk down the boardwalk. It feels like a really cool artist community, which Woodstock probably was before it became commercialized and whatnot. Did your apartment get badly damaged in the storm? It got some damage, yeah. My basement was full of water and trash and the concrete on the basement floor got all messed up. But you know, compared to a lot of spots around me it was not that bad. Do you ever see Patti Smith walking around there? Yeah, I met her out there, talked to her a little bit. That would be pretty cool… She seems pretty great. She told me when I met her that she in a way had given up on Manhattan as a place for innovative artistic people to really flourish. So she’s kind of trying to find this fringe neighborhood that has infinite possibilities and I think she feels like Rockaway is that zone. It’s cool. Do you feel like you’re a New Yorker for life now? Or having grown up in Memphis, going to school upstate and then… I don’t know, I guess… I mean, I always entertain the possibility of living somewhere else or trying to live overseas somewhere but it usually ends up coming back to New York being the place that I get down with most. At this point are you guys working on the live show? And if so, what’s that process been like picking these songs that were born out of jams and then applying them to your live band and also I don’t know if you can reinterpret them exactly or do you need additional people with you? We’re not going to have additional people. We’re trying to do things differently though, and we really want to make it easier on ourselves. Which I think… We’ve been playing since 2007 as a live band where we play everything live and try to recreate all these sounds. Ben’s playing a keyboard part with two hands and then having to switch to another one and then sing, and James is playing tambourine and keyboard at the same time… All this stuff that we kind of had a moment where we were like, “Who’s really impressed by this? And what are we losing with the kind of stage show and entertainment value by having to be completely focused on all these parts?” We’re going to try to have some sounds sequenced that we’re playing with. But in a way that still allows for extended parts and jamming and stuff like that but it’s already kind of taking a big bit of stress off of our backs I think. And it doesn’t feel wrong it just feels kind of nice and I think we’ll look happier and more into it on stage. Do you think you will incorporate moments of improvisation in the live show or stick with a more stylized performance? No, I think there are still going to be moments of improvisation. I mean, it’s a combination, we’re trying to go back and re-arrange all of our old songs too, mostly just by re-arranging by changing up the sounds and \ adding sounds that make it more in line with some of the new songs which I think is cool. It’s not like they’re unrecognizable by any means but they’re different, fresh and I think that people will like that. In that sense, do you feel like obligated to play “Kids” or “Time to Pretend” or “Congratulations” or any certain songs from your past or in a sense do you feel like Animal Collective, where they only play new songs? And they’ve done a good job at that but I’m sure at some point these people are going to want to hear something off of Merriweather Post. We’re still getting songs from every era. We’re trying to think of it from the perspective of the audience a little bit because you don’t want to deny some simple pleasure of hearing a song that they want to hear. I can understand really wanting to push it and be experimental but our whole goal as using some backing tracks, I guess you could say, even though that’s where it sounds bad, it’s just to free ourselves up so that we can engage more and can feel more like an experience live. You know, I think Tame Impala was an inspiration for us for our live show because their live show is incredible and it’s super tight and they have some things that are kind of sequenced filters or effects that kind of make things sound just like the album when it needs to or they can kind of go off and do something, but their show flows well. That’s what we really want to do is have things flow and kind of have an arc to it. I got really into Parliament live. I got a double LP in Memphis, I really liked that one and I really like a couple DJ mixes I’ve gotten, this guy Intergalactic Gary. I listen to WFMU all the time and have the app on my phone so I’ll hear a song and be like, “What’s that?” and take a picture and then go download it. We’re putting out a single cassette of “Alien Days” for Record Store Day and the B-Side of the cassette is this guy who I heard on WFMU called Hardy White. He has this show where he’s just got this incredible way of kind of with this really. We just got in touch with him through the radio station. Recently, I haven’t really seen much live music at all. I’ve been like DJing a little bit in Rockaway but just random parties and kind of low-key things for friends. But I’ve really gotten to enjoy DJing—building sets and having an arc to it that’s really fun. I’m glad you say that because I feel like since the iPod, a lot of times musicians DJing is just playing their iPod it’s cool to see you treating it like a setlist, organizing all this stuff. And do you do vinyl mostly? No, I’m still digital with the goal of kind of once I figure out the set that I really get into, then I’ll try to track everything down on vinyl. But I like using this virtual DJ program which is probably not the top thing but I’ve been using it for years because you can have like six virtual turntables at once, but I use four so I can have these going and set a loop and I can have three other songs or three other loops playing so you can kind of end up making your own music which is pretty cool. You cover a Fade Jade song on MGMT how did you pick that cover? It’s a ‘60’s kind of like flower pop band from Long Island called Fade Jade. The song we covered, I’m pretty sure it’s on one of the Nuggets compilations, is called “Introspection.” That was a band that my friend introduced me to five or six years ago and I’ve always been into that song and then there was a moment in the recording process when last summer or something when it felt like we didn’t know what to do next and we still didn’t know what we were doing and so I was just like, “Screw it, let’s try a cover.” So we started recording that and then we were just really happy with the way it sounded. Do you think that influenced the tone of the sessions after that? Yeah, I think lyrically it fits in that theme of the record because actually Dave was the one who was really pushing for this final track order. He thinks there’s this kind of story line that really works so “Introspection” comes kind of after this initial introduction to the darker, slightly more menacing, questioning side of things, then comes “Introspection,” and then the result of the introspection is like the realization is that your life is a lie or something. It’s kind of like really twisted. I feel like there’s two distinct halves, sides to the record because the second side is way more the kind of dream sequence, kind of nighttime, trippy side. You mentioned that this concept of life being a lie but what you said in the last hour or so it sounds like your life is the opposite. You’ve kind of reclaimed the artist community, you’re working the DJ set, you’re playing the music you want to play, it’s not a lie in that sense. Who knows where that song came from. While we were like tripping hard on acid by a fire but I just started singing that. I kind of think it must be directed at some other people. I think Ben and I kind of enjoy going on rants about people that we don’t really agree with their approach to life. But at the same time it’s interesting that sometimes people will be listening whether it’s at a bar or a party and not getting the life element. That’s why I think it’s funny too is that that’s kind of like the catchiest, shortest song on the album so that would be really incredible I think if that song were to get popular because then everyone’s singing, “Your life is a lie.” When you find yourself singing older lyrics listening back do you channel who you were then or did you sing it to put on a good live show for your friends or your audience? I still connect to the older lyrics, a lot of them. I mean, some of them not as much but I think it’s important to try to channel the feelings when you’re singing it and get into that zone.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 21, 2013, 08:41:40 PM
This is a terrific piece in Memphis magazine that's quite comprehensive.  I'm not including the numerous links to videos and interviews simply because, well, I'm not getting paid to do this and I'm exhausted.  So instead of reading it here, follow the link that I've provided.


http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2013/The-Music-of-Andrew-VanWyngarden-Part-Two-Congratulations-and-Beyond/ (http://www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901/November-2013/The-Music-of-Andrew-VanWyngarden-Part-Two-Congratulations-and-Beyond/)

The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden, Part Two: "Congratulations" and Beyond

In the December 2011 Memphis magazine cover story “The Future is Now,” I took an up-close-and-personal look at Andrew VanWyngarden, the world-famous musician who hails from Memphis. As lead singer of the indie rock band MGMT, VanWyngarden's career has led him to platinum records, Grammy nominations, and the world's biggest stages.

Who is Andrew VanWyngarden and how did he become one of the hottest musicians on the planet? Read the full story to find out. You can buy it here.

As a web-only supplement to the story, Memphis magazine examined "The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden", ostensibly in two parts.

Part one looked at VanWyngarden's musical outpout during his time at White Station High School, in the bands Glitter Penis and Accidental Mersh. It also examined the music of MGMT from the Time to Pretend EP and culminating with the band's smash major-label debut, Oracular Spectacular.

Part One was posted in December 2011 with the promise that Part Two, about "Congratulations and Beyond," would be released in imminent fashion. I admit it has strained the definitional bounds of the phrase “Coming Soon” to put it out almost two years later.

But, you know what? This isn’t all on me. I’ll take 55 percent of the blame, but, like, 45 percent is the fault of MGMT. I realized that Part Two couldn’t be properly assembled until MGMT’s third album dropped, because the band was still collecting material for the "beyond" indicated in the title of the post. In early 2012, that seemed like that album really was coming soon. But it didn’t come out until freakin’ September 2013. And I knew the band had a tour date in Memphis during the fall. So, I decided to time this post with their show.

That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

At long last, I’m pleased to present Part Two of “The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden,” which considers the MGMT album Congratulations and beyond. Well, at least up to when MGMT enters the orbit of their third, self-titled album.

Which is terrific, but the subject of some distant day blog post.

I PROMISE.

Congratulations (Columbia Records)

The headline of a Reuters dispatch upon the release of MGMT’s second album, Congratulations: “Justin Bieber, MGMT lead U.S. album chart.” With 66,000 units sold upon the album’s release, it was MGMT’s best week ever, commercially. Congratulations charted and sold well around the world. This album was a departure for MGMT, though. After touring and playing songs like “Kids” over and over for years and doing it karaoke style, MGMT wanted to make an album that was music that they felt good about that wasn’t overly serious but wasn’t joke-y either.

“With the second album, Congratulations, we had toured a lot and seen the major label system from the inside, and seen other bands and how it affected them, so it was much more a diary of the album. It was personal. A lot of relationships went in the lyrics, between musicians or romantic relationships. But I feel it’s more cynical in a way.”

Despite the opening week’s sales, on a micro level, Congratulations did not share the success ofOracular Spectacular. It didn’t have those three big hits — or any, for that matter. As MGMT began its tour to support the album, some critics ripped them, and the fans didn’t respond to the new material live at first.

That changed over the course of a year-plus of playing sold-out shows around the world. In May 2011, after recently completing a leg in Asia, VanWyngarden was excited about how fans were responding to Congratulations. “By then it had come full circle and we were playing some of the best shows we’ve ever played, and the crowds were singing along to all of the new songs. It’s turned into a really positive thing.”

 

“It’s Working”

A great song that lets telegraphs in the first millisecond a new direction for the band. Great surf-music vibe.

I love this video and definitely know what it's about.

 

Also: "It's Working" on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson

“Song for Dan Treacy”

Named after the lead singer of Television Personalities.

 

“Flash Delirium”

The second best song on Congratulations, I totally love it. "Flash Delirium" has one of my favorite wry commentaries MGMT makes on itself: "The hot dog's getting cold, and you'll never be as good as the Rolling Stones."

And if you've never seen the video, you must you must YOU MUST! It contains all three of the following: singing vagina, phallic snake monster, and anus machine.

I love this video and definitely know what it's about.

 

"I Found a Whistle"

A wistful and deeply meloncholic song.

 

“Siberian Breaks”

The best of all MGMT songs, and if you don't agree I'll fight you. It's 9 or 10 different songs, beautfully structured together. I can listen to it on infinite repeat, if necessary. Don't tempt me.

Memphis magazine: "What’s your songwriting process. 'Siberian Breaks' is a long song; there are a lot of words in that song. Do you write the lyrics then build the song around them, or vice versa?"

Andrew VanWyngarden: "Usually, songs will be complete instrumentally and musically, and we’ll have an idea of the melody and the lyrics over a few months. Lyrics usually come last."

Memphis: "You’ve been on movie soundtracks, but what about doing a score? When I hear 'Siberian Breaks,' I can hear Ennio Morricone and Angelo Badalamenti in it."

VanWyngarden: "Definitely. I love Morricone. We’re waiting for the right movie, the right screenplay to come along. We’ve had some offers and we really want to do it but don’t want to make our debut on a movie that’s not really our style. But, yeah, we’re really into that idea and could do something fun. I’ve always wanted to make something more in the Tangerine Dream kind of old school synthesizer. I really like Daft Punk’s Tron Legacy score. I was worried it was going to be too Disneyed out, but it’s not. It’s pretty sweet."

 "Brian Eno"

MGMT performed "Brian Eno," named after the influential musician and producer, along with "Flash Delirium" on Saturday Night Live, hosted by Gabourey Sidibe.

“Lady Dada’s Nightmare”

MGMT sounds like what a 1960s band might have sounded like if the'80s happened first. Frequently pschedelic, the music is nevertheless rooted in electronic sounds and snth pop heaven. It invites and in some ways confounds the listener.

 

"Congratulations"

A lovely acoustic, mildly Asian-sounding closer, the thematic bookend piece to Oracular Spectacular's "Time to Pretend."

Plus, the video! Such a sad thing.

I love this video and definitely know what it's about.

 

...and Beyond

MGMT was busy in between the albums Congratulations and MGMT.

They showed up during Conan O'Brien's Pink Floyd week in 2011 and played an awesome version of "Lucifer Sam," replete with lobstermen ambience. Watch it here, while you can, I guess.

 

"LateNightTales"

They also curated an entry in the LateNightTales mixtape series. The

Here's the commercial for it.

"Guggenheim Museum"

In November 2011, MGMT pulled off one of its best tricks so far. They played at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, playing all new music inspired by and in the midst of an art installment by Maurizio Cattelan.

Here's Pitchfork on the event, including stunningly gorgeous photos. And more photos.

 "Future Games"

In Summer 2012, MGMT went back to mining oldies for its cover of Fleetwood Mac's "Future Games," for a tribute album. Hear it here.

 

"MGMT"

MGMT went back to the studio and knocked out their third album, MGMT. That's the subject of "The Music of Andrew VanWyngarden, Part Three: MGMT and Beyond-erer," Coming Soon!

 

To tide you over, here's a brand-stankin' new interview with VanWyngarden in the Memphis Flyer, written by my colleague Joe Boone. Read it read it!

 

MGMT is on tour now and plays Memphis' Orpheum Theatre on Saturday, November 23rd. Opening act is Kuroma, fronted by VanWyngarden's Accidental Mersh bandmate and sometime MGMT guitarist Hank Sullivant.

I will be at the show and will have a review up on the Flyer soon thereafter, which I'll link from here when it's live. Honestly.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 21, 2013, 08:43:33 PM
http://m.memphisflyer.com/memphis/new-mgmt/Content?oid=3551439 (http://m.memphisflyer.com/memphis/new-mgmt/Content?oid=3551439)

MGMT comes to the Orpheum this Saturday. And for member Andrew VanWyngarden, a 2001 White Station High School graduate, it's something of a return home. VanWyngarden is half of the platinum-selling musical duo that formed at Wesleyan University in 2002, along with Ben Goldwasser. (VanWyngarden is also the son of Flyer editor Bruce VanWyngarden.)

We talked with one of Memphis' biggest musical successes about MGMT's new self-titled third album on Sony Music and the storm of commentary that seems to follow the band.

Memphis Flyer: Everybody has an opinion about this record. What do you think?

Andrew VanWyngarden: I'm a little biased, because I made it. I like it. I think it's not very comfortable-sounding music. It's something Ben and I tried to make intentionally a little upsetting in a way. It's not easy listening. We try to avoid the word challenging, because I think that's a bit pretentious. It accurately reflects Ben's mood and my mood when we were recording in 2012. I think it's an honest and real album. I'm proud of it and happy to tour around to promote it.

How did your approach change from the earlier albums?

It was just me and Ben in the studio. On the second album [Congratulations], we were definitely going for a more live, whole band, sort of psychedelic folk sound. This time around, it was more about the two of us experimenting in the studio. We weren't thinking about translating the songs to a live setting. It's really all about the listening experience. And this is studio time. It's been different for each of our three albums. This time, it was more about starting off with sessions of improvisation and finding moments that we both liked and building songs out of those. A lot of arranging and editing. We haven't put out an album that has live takes or more than one person playing at once. Maybe bass and drums or something. We've always worked more in the sense of setting the time and then getting it together.

Did you intentionally abandon formal song structures?

There are still songs like "Alien Days" and "Plenty of Girls in the Sea" that are more traditionally structured and have verses and what we call choruses and that kind of stuff. But, in general, the headspace we were in while we were making it was about creating dense sonic worlds that you can get overwhelmed in if you want to. It was more about trance, in the sense that we would do things that were repeating over and over. And the chord progressions are more simple than on the first two records. So it's more about repetition. What we were looking for in the improvisations and the moments we try to build songs on were usually ones where Ben and I felt like we were in a trance state. In the moment we were making it, we felt like it was automatically happening.

You wore your early influences on your sleeve. Who influenced this new direction?

Our musical tastes have evolved. I think we were definitely going for a Beach Boys Surf's Up thing [on Congratulations]. But also definitely influenced by tones and personalities of more obscure English '80s bands like the Deep Freeze Mice, the Monochrome Set, that kind of stuff.

This time around, what makes this album different — and I think what makes it cool — is that we didn't go into it with specific musical references in mind. For the second album, we knew we were consciously trying to reference a moment in musical history. This time, we weren't doing that at all. The music we listened to while we were making it was much more about textures and the kind of environments than sounds ... Woo, the Orb, and Aphex Twin. The songs are their own individual worlds to go into.

Why did you return to work with producer Dave Fridmann after an album with Sonic Boom?

Even on Congratulations, we mixed it at Fridmann's studio. So he was still part of that album but not as much on pre-production. Since we first went up to Tarbox Road Studios, we have felt comfortable there recording and creating. Dave is the kind of guy who helps to push us and motivate us to do the crazy ideas we have. He's such a good guy. He doesn't have an underlying intention or motivation to mess with the song or stamp his own kind of sound on it. That makes us feel comfortable working with him. This time, it was cool to go back. We've only done this a couple of times, when we're writing everything in the studio with Dave.

How important is it to isolate yourselves from the social-media commentariat?

That's one of the things about being at Dave's studio in rural, western New York — it's easy to forget about that side of the music world and to kind of push it out. I think that's what Ben and I have done while making the second and third albums. Both times, we've gotten completely into our own world and come out and released it and been a little bit giddy. Back to that naive mindset thing ...

Ben and I both feel a little bit shocked [at the response]. We're both sensitive dudes. A lot of times it feels like it's a competition to see who can say the snarkiest thing. It's so much less about listening deep into the music, which is all we want to do. The good thing is that if music critics aren't doing that, then our fans are more and more. We hear it from them. That's why we play shows. We're fortunate that we've established and developed deep connections with our fans. They've kind of followed us along and gone down different paths of experimentation with us. And that's what we want.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Rachel on November 21, 2013, 09:49:33 PM
Loved that one. Ooohh, our boys.  :)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: shra on November 21, 2013, 10:28:37 PM
That last paragraph gets to me, awwww :D
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Hunter Clark on November 21, 2013, 11:48:39 PM
I'm glad they know we care, it makes me heart ache in all the right ways.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 22, 2013, 04:46:40 PM
http://whoismgmt.com/image/67780316856 (http://whoismgmt.com/image/67780316856)

You can read the NME interview ^
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 27, 2013, 12:19:31 PM
http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/mgmt-turns-inward-on-new-album/Content?oid=1712255 (http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/mgmt-turns-inward-on-new-album/Content?oid=1712255)

MGMT turns inward on new album
"I think there's a universal human feeling of not living up to our full potential."

"We are trying to process the feeling of being confused and overwhelmed," says MGMT's Andrew VanWyngarden. "And not overwhelmed by band experiences, but by life experiences. The themes of the [new] songs get into existential problems and bigger issues that affect everyone, and not just us."

As these themes suggest, VanWyngarden is just like you and me. In fact, he spent some of his formative years growing up in Wilkinsburg, went to McEwen Elementary (a now-defunct school in Shadyside), and even almost lost his prized Pirates hat when it slipped out of his hand and into centerfield during an early-'90s Pirates game.

"I had to convince the usher it was mine instead of Andy Van Slyke's," he says. "But I got it back."

Unlike you and me, VanWyngarden is the frontman of a popular, successful band — making the existential musings intriguing, a thematic departure from the humor-and-irony-driven ascent of the band's initial surge to stardom.

On MGMT's new self-titled full-length, gone are the days of sunnier psychedelic dance pop, that earlier, broadly popular era punctuated by ironic and humorous gold singles "Time to Pretend" and "Electric Feel," and the platinum, world-breaking ode to the comforting longings of nostalgia, "Kids." Founding members VanWyngarden and Benjamin Goldwasser have chosen to descend toward creating structure-defying, gauzily-produced and heavily layered songs with existential themes: the end of civilization ("Mystery Disease"), alien invasion ("Alien Days"), self-examination ("Your Life Is a Lie", "Introspection"). There is an integrity behind this inward turn and continued experimentation: Instead of shamelessly attempting to re-create the past's ironic success, MGMT chose to get serious.

In the early 2000s, Van Wyngarden and Goldwasser were slumming in the dorms of Wesleyan University, making funny sounds with old synthesizers, hosting "concerts" consisting of friends sitting in a circle and being weird. An EP of jokey pop songs released on the small indie Cantora Records seemed to serve as the peak for another obscure college act only their friends would remember. But in fact — that EP found its way to the ears of Columbia Records, who declared the group worthy of a record deal. Next came collaborating with star producer Dave Fridmann and recording an album, Oracular Spectacular, that, on the strength of its ironic and humorous songs sold 900,000 copies in an era where albums don't sell 900,000 copies.

The band's first hit single, "Time to Pretend," comically trumpets: "Let's make some music, make some money, find some models for wives." The ultimate irony is how prescient the song turned out to be. But success was overwhelming.

MGMT's second album, 2010's Congratulations, was a personal reaction to being thrust into stardom. Humor and irony are replaced by an intimate sensitivity. Abandoning the immediate, hook-heavy pop of the first album for complex and ambitious multi-part suites, these songs welcomed being spun on a turntable in some darkened basement, examined seriously.

Debuting strongly at No. 2 on the Billboard top 200, Congratulations ended up selling a little over 200,000 copies — respectable, but a far cry from the Oracular Spectacular rocket ship. Quick success had created the difficult second album; would this be a momentary diversion before the predictable, return-to-their-popular-roots third act?

Quite the contrary, this third album shows Congratulations was a spot on the map towards MGMT's ultimate destination. Bridges and codas appear unpredictably out of an ether of swelling instruments; a darker, psychedelic pop supports more mature lyrical themes. This approach is divisive, adulated by some and discomfiting to others, who, VanWyngarden believes, do not wish to examine the issues these songs confront.

"The lyricism is about why there is a dissonance of knowing you should be somewhere a little further along, and knowing that you're not and trying to figure out what's keeping you from getting there," VanWyngarden says. "I think there's a universal human feeling of not living up to our full potential."

We like to think of our celebrities as transcending existential dilemmas — this idea is at the core of the great American desire to be famous. But, when a successful band admits to being tormented by the unanswerable questions that affect us all, the illusion of celebrity is shattered. This is challenging to an audience, and negative reactions are inevitable. This can also be rewarding, and the third album is: Initial inscrutability gives way to illumination.

Reacting to success will be the overarching storyline in MGMT's career. When a debut album explodes, most bands pursue duplication — to try to make that same album again and again. Bands who completely diverge from a successful formula confound their initial supporters, open themselves to fail at their new experiments, and cast a shadow of doubt over the veracity of that initial success. But this approach also liberates and dignifies. Let's appreciate the poignant idealism behind the struggle with being identified that drives a band towards experimentation; most importantly, let's appreciate a band for whom success may not be and never was the ultimate goal.

This time around, the second single, "Your Life Is a Lie," is the band's ironic song — appearing on an album where the band's primary objective is to tell its fans the honest truth.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on November 27, 2013, 04:19:22 PM
http://m.metro.us/newyork/entertainment/music/2013/11/26/no-more-time-to-pretend-for-mgmt/ (http://m.metro.us/newyork/entertainment/music/2013/11/26/no-more-time-to-pretend-for-mgmt/)

No more ‘Time to Pretend’ for MGMT

MGMT’s Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser never wanted to be famous. But quirky poppy zingers like “Kids,” “Electric Feel” and “Time To Pretend” from their 2007 debut, “Oracular Spectacular” made them household names, especially after being featured in movies such as “21,” TV shows like “The Voice” and a Nokia ad. It was like their psychedelic private art house jamming session had been crashed by an accidental open Facebook invitation.

Rather than embrace the masses, the Brooklyn-based duo stoically continued with an ever more zany second album “Congratulations,” in 2010. Indeed, the early days of face paints, hippie headwear and neon accents were discarded in a now forgotten fancy-dress box – and “Kids” was no longer on the set list.

This apparent fan neglect reads as career suicide; MGMT’s paradoxical style can seem frustratingly hipster but they, as self-indulgent as this sounds, are out to please themselves. The 30-year-old rockers are in an enviably privileged position with the backing of a major label [Columbia], free to satiate their musical whims – something they’ve taken into their self-titled third album “MGMT.”

Here, Goldwasser chats about the new album, pop culture and his disdain for social media.

 

You said that your music has been misunderstood and labeled incorrectly in the past. Is this album about reestablishing your identity?

I feel like we’re presenting ourselves in the way we’d like to be seen. I think it’s a little strange to us that people want to impose a narrative on us as a band. We’re not thinking too much about what our image is or what we’d like to be known for.

 

Your music is often described as paradoxical. Is it important for you to create something that’s intangible or ineffable?

I think in a lot of ways music is always about the intangible. I think our album is music that a lot people could get into, potentially. We’re not trying to scare or be intentionally experimental but also I don’t think you want to be known only as a band who writes quirky pop songs.

 

You get a lot of criticism for alienating your fans but you’ve got nearly 4 million Facebook likes. Do you find it frustrating that critics and people keep harking back to the days of “Time to Pretend” and “Kids”?

It’s frustrating. We’ve never intentionally alienated anybody. We’re people who appreciate lots of different music: catchy dance music, noisy industrial stuff and quiet pretty music that you’d listen to in your living room. Maybe a lot of the critics who said we’re trying to alienate our fans only have this one-dimensional appreciation of music.

 

You only started tweeting in January of this year. Why have you been resistant to embrace your fans via social media?

I guess we just started doing it because we were bored in the studio and we were looking for something to do. But I don’t personally do any social media stuff.

 

NoFacebook?

No, I’m not on Facebook, no. I just do Instagram – posting funny things I see on the street. We don’t really like putting our egos out there as a band – I don’t really have the energy for that kind of stuff.

 

Is it because you’re concerned about your privacy?

I mean, partially. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t care about having some sort of privacy. I don’t really appreciate that level of ego-driven social media behavior – I just think it’s really obnoxious. It’s a similar thing to how people behave really differently when they’re behind the wheel of the car and they’re anonymous. They do all those things that they would never do face-to-face with someone else. I think social media is really similar to that in a lot of ways – there’s a lot of disgusting behavior.

 

What do you dislike about pop culture?

I don’t want to say that I dislike it. It has its place but I think there’s room for a little more subtlety in pop culture. It’s really strange for us as a band because we’ve been accepted by mainstream culture kind of by accident. But we also draw so much of our inspiration from underground stuff that never reached the mainstream. So we have a complicated relationship, I guess.

 

In “Plenty of Girls in the Sea” you say “The trick is to try to stay free.” Why splice politics into your lyrics?

I think there is a lack of freedom here. I think if more people started acting on what they really believed in and started saying what’s on their minds or that kind of thing, there would be a lot of opposition. A lot of people are afraid and too comfortable or don’t want to risk giving up that level of comfort for potentially something better. I feel like things could go in a nasty direction if people realized that the comfort that they thought they had is in fact transient.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 02, 2013, 02:06:07 PM
http://www.courant.com/entertainment/hc-mgmt-at-oakdale-1205-20131202,0,3251383.story (http://www.courant.com/entertainment/hc-mgmt-at-oakdale-1205-20131202,0,3251383.story)

MGMT Plays The Oakdale by Michael Hamad

During a period of relative stability, MGMT has produced its least stable-sounding record so far.

"MGMT," the self-titled new album by the duo of Benjamin Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden (their fourth overall), gathers together 45 minutes of lysergic bluster, arena-rock drums, synths and sirens, fraying interludes and unexpected codas. It's also the band's most confident statement to date, wrapped in an increasingly unhinged sound-world.

"While Ben and I feel more confident and at ease with doing what we want to do and not letting outside influences or expectations get in the way artistically, I think that the new album sounds pretty uncomfortable," said VanWyngarden.

To write and record "MGMT," the two holed up in a Buffalo, N.Y. studio for a half-dozen sessions, surrounded by banks of keyboards and wires. They jammed for hours, without preconceived notions of what they were looking for, cut off from the outside world. Chemicals were ingested. Four measures of groove here, 15 seconds of texture there, a genuine vibe or feeling: signs of a successful session. The lyrics, for the most part, came later (except for "Your Life is a Lie," which emerged fully formed).

"We tried to get into this crazy realm," VanWyngarden said. "We surrounded ourselves in a circle of instruments we had all set up in a room, all plugged into a board. We went in without any sort of goal... We were trying to get to these points that felt that we were coming from another world... It's hard to put it into words without sounding cheeseball."

VanWyngarden cites filmmaker David Lynch, who practices Transcendental Meditation, and the late Lou Reed, who often didn't understand his lyrics until weeks after writing them, as models. "A lot of other artists have worked this way," VanWyngarden said. "We didn't know what we sounded like or where it was coming from. That's the kind of thing that's been taken out of the promotional materials."

Comb through the lyrics to any of "MGMT"'s 10 tracks, and you're bound to find a few head-scratchers. "Must've skipped the ship and joined the team for a ride," VanWyngarden sings on "Alien Days," the unabashedly psychedelic opening number, "A couple hours to learn the controls and commandeer both my eyes." (You'll want to spend some time with this one, he seems to say.) "A Good Sadness," which opens in a swirl of harmonically wandering synths, finds VanWyngarden distilling his thoughts down to a few repeated, disconnected utterances: "No line / Disprove / Mean time / Desperate / Confide / Inrush / Disprove." On "I Love You Too, Death," he recites a series of couplets, over stacked fourths and sevenths, like these two:

Try to memorize your smell

It reminds me of a field

Crickets clearer than a bell

Have all their guts recast in steel

Other than a faithful cover of "Introspection," a 1968 song by the Long Island, N.Y. band Faine Jade, you're unlikely to find much comfort in the music either. Chords spontaneously change stripes, flower-power progressions devolve into coloristic word-paintings; even the gentle, swinging groove of "Plenty of Girls in the Sea," the album's other conventional song, is undermined by what sounds like a police siren. Amid calm seas, there's always disruption.

"I'm happy with the new album," VanWyngarden said. "It was unexpected to me, the music we ended up making."

Not surprisingly, the album's accompanying visuals are pretty damn trippy. A high-budget, glossy video for the song "Cool Song No. 2," directed by Isaiah Seret, stars Boardwalk Empire's Michael Kenneth Williams as The Plant Hunter, a mercenary who infiltrates an illegal drug manufacturing compound to rescue his lover, Tree, a junkie who's slowly mutating into a plant. Seriously.

Like Tree, the band seems to be transforming. Once derided as a mediocre live act, their shows have improved considerably. They've embraced taping at shows, perhaps with an eye toward drawing the jam-band crowd. (VanWyngarden is a huge Phish fan.) Once resistant to oversharing on social media, they've announced an Instagram contest where the winner will bang a giant cowbell onstage during "Your Life is a Lie."

When we spoke, MGMT had just wrapped a European tour, their first since 2010, and VanWyngarden was happy with the reception. "It was a very intense tour in terms of how many shows we played," he said. "It all went really well. People get it in their heads that we are one thing and not another. We definitely have a reputation as a bad live act, so it felt good to play some great shows."

MGMT arrives at the Dome in Wallingford on Dec. 6. The appearance, which falls toward the end of the tour, is a kind of homecoming for VanWyngarden and Goldwasser, who met as freshmen at Wesleyan.

"I saw shows [at the Oakdale] when I was in college," VanWyngarden said. "That's a very special area in the country for me. I'm excited to come back."
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 03, 2013, 06:00:30 PM
http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2013/12/03/mgmt-new-music (http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2013/12/03/mgmt-new-music)  You can listen in this link, or below is the transcript.

JEREMY HOBSON, HOST:

It's HERE AND NOW.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TIME TO PRETEND")

MGMT: (Singing) I'm feeling rough. I'm feeling raw. I'm in the prime of my life.

HOBSON: That is the well-known 2008 song "Time To Pretend" from the band MGMT. The band members were just college kids when they wrote the song, which is about what it would be like to be famous.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TIME TO PRETEND")

MGMT: (Singing) This is our decision, to live fast and die young. We've got the vision. Now let's have some fun.

HOBSON: Well, they did become famous. They won a Grammy. They played with Paul McCartney. But their second album didn't go over as well. So they decided to take some time off. Well, now they are out with their third album, and they're here to share it with us. Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden, welcome to HERE AND NOW.

BEN GOLDWASSER: Thank you.

ANDREW VANWYNGARDEN: Hi. Thanks.

HOBSON: Well, tell us what you're trying to do with this new album. It's been a while since you guys have come out with an album.

VANWYNGARDEN: Yeah. Well, we took about a year off from really touring or writing and then used our rejuvenated spirits to kind of go into the studio, and through improvisation we recorded an album. And we didn't really have like a goal. We kind of just wanted it to be a pure representation of working in the studio and being in the moment, that kind of thing.

HOBSON: And sometimes hours and hours of improvisation, right?

GOLDWASSER: Yeah. We wanted to get to the point where we weren't overanalyzing what we were doing. And that was the best way to do it, which is to play for long enough that we kind of forgot what we were doing. And then it kind of seemed like the music was coming out of thin air.

HOBSON: What's the best example of one of the songs on the new album that benefited from all the improvisation?

VANWYNGARDEN: "A Good Sadness." Most of the song came kind of fully formed out of an improvised section of music. Originally it was like 20 or 30 minutes. But in general the structure of it and the kind of the main sounds that are going on, that's how they were played live.

HOBSON: Let's take a listen to a little bit of that.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "A GOOD SADNESS")

HOBSON: Of course a lot of people know you from your first album. How was the process different for this one than that?

VANWYNGARDEN: The first album, it was all pretty new to us. We just signed to Columbia, to a major label. And we went in to write songs to go along with three songs that we had already written in college: "Kids," "Time To Pretend" and "Electric Feel." So we found, like, a little dance studio in the industrial part of Williamsburg. And the songs pretty much all have a lot of tracks that we recorded ourselves in kind of like a lo-fi way, unintentionally at least.

So this new one is way different since we recorded everything, you know, over the course of a year and didn't go in the studio with any songs already written.

HOBSON: And as you were doing this, did you feel pressure from fans who wanted to hear that early stuff, "Electric Feel," as you said, "Kids"? They wanted that sound.

GOLDWASSER: I mean, in some ways it's a tough relationship because on the one hand we're really grateful for the fans we have. But at the same time, we've seen how opinions can change. I feel like we have kind of a mutual respect between us and our fans where they trust us when we want to do something different and they're patient with this. And those are the fans that we really want to keep around.

HOBSON: But there are some fans that have not been patient with you. You were booed at a concert in London when you didn't play "Kids."

VANWYNGARDEN: When was that?

HOBSON: 2010.

GOLDWASSER: Did you read it in NME?

(LAUGHTER)

HOBSON: Is it wrong? Did that not happen?

VANWYNGARDEN: Well, I mean lots of things were weird in 2010. I think, you know, that was right after our album - second album came out. And definitely, it was a shock to some people who only knew us for a couple of songs, like you were saying. And so Ben and I got a little bit of enjoyment out of going on stage and playing these long, psychedelic, sweet-style songs and denying people what they really wanted.

You know, I think at that point, the scales were a little bit tipped towards giving the people what they didn't want. And now we've come back and kind of found a good balance where the live show has songs from all three albums, and I think it's really working well.

GOLDWASSER: I don't want to make it sound like we didn't care about giving people a good show though. And I think that touring for the last album, the music press was kind of sensationalizing how we'd completely abandoned any sort of pop music structures or things like that. And in reality, the shows were really great and most people enjoyed them. And, you know, it wasn't as black and white as it was made out to be by some people.

HOBSON: Well, let's take a listen to one of the songs on your new album. This is called "Alien Days."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALIEN DAYS")

MGMT: (Singing) A couple hours to learn the controls and commandeer both my eyes. Hey, be quick, dear. Times are uncertain. One month crawling, next year blurring. Decades in the drain, monograms on the brain. Decide what's working and what's moved on to the last phase. The floodgate alien days, I love those alien days. Mm, the alien days.

HOBSON: There is a spacey sound to that, isn't there?

VANWYNGARDEN: Yeah, I guess you could say that. It definitely has references with the drums and maybe the harpsichord. A little bit of, like, glam or space rock from the '70s.

HOBSON: But I do want to ask you about the titles of some of the songs because if you look at your earlier songs, you've got "The Youth," "Electric Feel," "Kids." And then the titles of these ones - "Mystery Disease," "A Good Sadness," "I Love You To Death" - people might ask, are you getting older and bitter?

VANWYNGARDEN: No. You know, you're asking about songs that we wrote when we were 19 and songs that we wrote when we were 30, and obviously, like, we've had a lot more life experiences. We've had the experiences with our band, which are pretty surreal and bizarre at times, in their own right. And maybe on the second album there was like a little vein of bitterness, kind of confusion as to what had just happened.

And the new song titles, I think, are just trying to be a little bit more real and open and honest. And just for us both, there happened to be moments of melancholy or confusion still and just wondering why things happen.

GOLDWASSER: I think in a lot of ways the new music is - for us it's the most positive music we've ever made because it's coming from a really honest place and we're not really trying to hide from anything or escape. And our old music, even though, I mean a lot of the lyrics were really idealistic, in a way for us it feels like more of a positive thing to write songs about how life is not always easy and there are some bad things happening in the world right now and confronting that and recognizing that everyone is thinking about that right now.

HOBSON: Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden from the band MGMT. We'll be back with them in a moment. You're listening to HERE AND NOW.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

HOBSON: It's HERE AND NOW.

Let's get back to our conversation with Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden from the band MGMT. They are best known for songs like this one, "Electric Feel," from their first album.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ELECTRIC FEEL")

MGMT: (Singing) I said, ooh, girl, shock me like an electric eel. Baby girl, turn me on with your electric feel.

HOBSON: Well, with their new album, MGMT continues to turn away from that poppier sound to a sound that's a bit darker.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COOL SONG NO. 2")

MGMT: (Singing) Wherever scientists turn lead to birds, torment ignites, essence delights from the Earth. What you find shocking, they find amusing. Something else to soften a sadistic urge.

HOBSON: That is "Cool Song No. 2" from their new album, which The New York Times calls both testing and eventually rewarding. And I want to ask you, Andrew VanWyngarden, when I spoke with John Gourley from the band Portugal The Man recently, he was talking about the difficulty of writing songs that are short, that it's a lot easier to write longer songs. And I notice that "Your Life Is A Lie" from your new album is only a couple of minutes long. Is it difficult to write a song like that?

VANWYNGARDEN: No. I think we wrote that song in like two minutes.

(LAUGHTER)

VANWYNGARDEN: I think that's one of the things I like about our new album, is that there's a lot of different styles and methods that went into the making of the songs. Like we said before, we have a song, "A Good Sadness," that's coming from improvisation, and then "Plenty Of Girls In The Sea," which is - we were trying to write almost like a standard or something. You know, we were like thinking about music from the '20s and...

(LAUGHTER)

VANWYNGARDEN: ..wanted it to be kind of like a novelty song. That's what I'm looking for.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PLENTY OF GIRLS IN THE SEA")

VANWYNGARDEN: I don't know. We're just kind of having fun in the studio. Ben and I really love working and writing in the studio and producing. And, you know, we did have a good break before starting on this third album, and now we're both in the mindset of really wanting to make more music more often. So hopefully that'll happen.

HOBSON: So that break is important. It's nice to take a little time off.

GOLDWASSER: It was at that time. We were feeling a little burnt out and disconnected after not having really taken much of a break between touring for the first album and the second album or - and recording the second album. It had a direct effect on our attitudes and the music that we were making. And sometimes it can be a little annoying when musicians write too much about being musicians and not enough about other things and feel like we were kind of going into that territory.

HOBSON: You got to get in touch with the outside world.

VANWYNGARDEN: Or the inside world.

GOLDWASSER: Yeah, or everyday life in general.

(LAUGHTER)

HOBSON: Who has influenced you in the last year or so, people that you've been listening to that maybe you weren't listening to when you were doing your earlier albums?

VANWYNGARDEN: Well, I mean it's different for the two of us. But I think maybe we kind of went in opposite directions. But for me, personally, compared to what I was listening to on the second album, which was a lot more psychedelic rock and folk from the late '60s and '70s, for the new album I definitely started getting into music, I guess, that you would call electronic music and dance music. It was kind of a new universe for me to explore. And I definitely moved away from rock and roll a little bit and got a little bit tired of rock and roll attitude.

(LAUGHTER)

VANWYNGARDEN: It sounds like a child behaving badly. I'm tired of your attitude.

(LAUGHTER)

HOBSON: Well, what is - let me ask both of you this question. What is your favorite song on the album? We can start with you, Ben.

GOLDWASSER: I think my favorite would be "Astro Mancy." I have a really good memory of recording it, and we kind of did a live mix of the song, which is mostly how it ended up on the final - the album version where Andrew and I were both sitting at the mixing board and we each had our own half of the board to be in control of, and we would just fade certain parts up when we felt like it was appropriate. And it has this really cool organic feeling to it.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ASTRO MANCY")

GOLDWASSER: Also, when we were in Chicago, it came on in a Starbucks, and I thought that was really cool.

HOBSON: Hmm. Really?

GOLDWASSER: Yeah.

VANWYNGARDEN: That was cool.

HOBSON: You still get excited when you hear it in a Starbucks?

VANWYNGARDEN: Corporate bastards.

(LAUGHTER)

HOBSON: What about you, Andrew? Favorite song on the album?

VANWYNGARDEN: My favorite song in the album is probably the last one, "An Orphan of Fortune." I just like the emotion in the last one and I think it's a nice closer on the album. I was really satisfied with how it ended the whole thing, tied everything up.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "AN ORPHAN OF FORTUNE")

MGMT: (Singing) If I don't feel right, polishing off the sand, lay by me and we'll erode as gently as we can into the twilight. Into the twilight. Into the twilight. Into the twilight.

HOBSON: As you're writing these songs, of course you have to think about what they're going to sound like. But you also have to think about the video that's going to go along with them these days. How does that process work? When do you start to think about what the video is going to be?

GOLDWASSER: Well, we do get a lot of imagery just in our heads when we're writing. And I think that did translate in a lot of ways to the videos that we've put out.

HOBSON: Well, I'm thinking of the video for "Your Life Is A Lie" with some people kicking a bucket on the ground when a cowbell is hit every time.

GOLDWASSER: Yeah. The original idea for the video was that it would be like a Whac-A-Mole game and like...

VANWYNGARDEN: Well, just something that emphasizes cowbell hits - just felt like, you know, a giant Whac-A-Mole baton thing, hitting people that were walking down the street would be funny. But I'm really happy with the way the video turned out. I think it fits the song really well, just the kind of - I don't know. The song definitely has a tongue-in-cheek element to the structure and obviously the lyrics. So I think it fit really well.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "YOUR LIFE IS A LIE")

MGMT: (Singing) Tell your wife this is your life. Your life is a lie. This is your wife. Now she knows, she understands her life is a lie. Nobody wins. Try not to cry. You must survive on your own, on your own.

HOBSON: Well, Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden of the band MGMT, thanks so much for speaking with us.

GOLDWASSER: Thanks for having us.

VANWYNGARDEN: Thank you.

HOBSON: And Robin, I cannot let this moment go by without mentioning that I know Ben's grandparents very well. Ned and Lizzie Goldwasser, they're great family friends from Champaign-Urbana. They have been married for 72 years. They've just celebrated their 72nd anniversary.

ROBIN YOUNG, HOST:

Well, I'm sure they're thinking right now, you know, we thought our kid was doing well. But now he's really made it.

HOBSON: Their grandson is doing very well.

YOUNG: He's been on Jeremy's show.

(LAUGHTER)

HOBSON: From NPR and WBUR Boston, I'm Jeremy Hobson.

YOUNG: I'm Robin Young. This is HERE AND NOW. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 05, 2013, 02:24:42 AM
Just a little pre-Toronto blurb but there are a couple of quotes that I like.

http://www.nowtoronto.com/music/story.cfm?content=195624 (http://www.nowtoronto.com/music/story.cfm?content=195624)

MGMT
Brooklyn duo learn to be who they wanna be
By KEVIN RITCHIE

MGMT was not an easy band to be in three years ago.
The introspective psych-folk of Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser’s second album, Congratulations, asked more of listeners than their celebrated debut, 2007’s Oracular Spectacular.
That album’s trio of feel-good electro-pop hits – Time To Pretend, Kids and Electric Feel – launched the Brooklyn-based duo’s career and inspired legions of neon-headband-wearing fans to emulate their shamanistic hippie pop star aesthetic.
When Congratulations came out, critics and fans alike accused MGMT of insolence and self-sabotage. Kids, their biggest hit, vanished from the set list, and audiences’ disappointment was palpable.
“In 2010 we went through a weird phase of feeling really self-conscious onstage,” singer/guitarist VanWyngarden explains during a tour stop in Charlotte, North Carolina. “But we probably made it worse ourselves than it really was.”
The press honeymoon effectively over, the pair took their psychedelic experimentation in a blistering electronic direction on their self-titled third album (Columbia).
Written in the studio with producer Dave Fridmann (The Flaming Lips, Black Moth Super Rainbow), its densely layered songs are full of feedback-drenched hi-hats, vocal effects and churning noise that nod to the solo work of Martin Rev and Alan Vega from influential proto-punkers Suicide.
MGMT’s sunny pop melodies occasionally shine through the digital din on tracks like Alien Days and Introspection – a cover of a 60s psych-pop obscurity – but others completely dispense with pop structure.
“It’s a tiny bit abrasive, aggressively mixed and a little bit grating sometimes,” VanWyngarden admits. “But what we’re trying to do under that initial messiness and noisiness is to create a whole slew of paths you can take through a song. So you can follow one sound and hear the song completely differently from the last time.”
VanWyngarden’s lyrics were inspired by surrealist poet Philip Lamantia, whose druggy verse conjures a world of erotic mysticism and melancholy. A political undercurrent grapples with disillusionment and apathy about current affairs.
That theme is bluntly articulated on confrontational single Your Life Is A Lie, a reaction to the blue-eyed escapism the band revelled in on songs like Electric Feel.
Nowadays, MGMT make room for both the escapist and the introspective in their set list. Having weathered the awkward sophomore phase, VanWyngarden and Goldwasser are high on a sense of liberation.
“We feel more at ease with the fact that there’s not a certain sound that we’re expected to make,” he says.
“Anything could be MGMT.”
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 06, 2013, 09:29:29 PM
http://espn.go.com/blog/music/post/_/id/6420/mgmts-vanwyngarden-recalls-luck-visit (http://espn.go.com/blog/music/post/_/id/6420/mgmts-vanwyngarden-recalls-luck-visit)

MGMT's VanWyngarden recalls Luck visit
By Daniel Dodd | ESPN.com
(http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2013/1206/sn_g_vanwyngarden01jr_576x324.jpg)

MGMT has come a long way since forming on the campus of Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT in the early 2000s, just a stones throw from ESPN headquarters.

The "dazzling electro-psych" band, as described by Rolling Stone in a review of the their 2008 debut album "Oracular Spectacular," has since opened for Paul McCartney at Fenway Park, released two more critically-acclaimed albums and been nominated for two Grammy Awards. Back in the Nutmeg State for a tour stop, we caught up with lead singer Andrew VanWyngarden to ask how he got Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck on stage at a show back in November.

Andrew, thanks for the time. So let’s get right to it. MGMT and Andrew Luck on stage together. Set the scene.
We usually have some kind of contest in each city and the winner gets to play the cowbell. Or we might bring out a friend. Our tour manager had played at the same venue with another band and Luck had come to that show. They were still in contact so we asked Andrew if he wanted to play and he did! Him and Anthony Castanzo came and played. Andrew seemed like a pretty hip dude. I had a great time and it was amazing just to stand next to him. The cowbell is like 75 pounds and it comes with a giant drumstick. Seeing this mega-man doing it was pretty funny to watch.

You’re not a huge sports fan though, right? Did you realize who these guys were?
James Richardson, our guitarist, was even more into it than me. He’s obsessed with everything NFL and fantasy football. He’s a Redskins fan, but he was still really into it.

Do you guys still get excited by finding out who listens to your music or in what areas of the world you are most popular?
Definitely. It’s always exciting. We’ve gone to places like South Korea where people are singing every word. It’s amazing to see. It’s fun to know when a celebrity or athlete likes our music.

What was it like playing Fenway Park when you opened for Paul McCartney?
We’re not really a stadium band. It was amazing to see Paul McCartney with all his pyrotechnics and stuff. I think a stadium like that is more suited to legendary acts like him. Being on the field at Fenway was very cool though.

Coming back to Connecticut must be a bit of a trip down memory lane. As was your recent show in Pittsburgh where you grew up. What has the last week been like?
Pittsburgh really was a trip down memory lane. We hadn’t played there since I think 2005. I haven’t really been around there much since I grew up. I went out with my tour manager just driving around to see the school I went to and the house I grew up in. And the place we are playing here in Connecticut, I think I went to a show or two there when I was in college.

Coming up you have the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. That’s still a fairly new venue, not a ton of artists have played there. Are you particularly excited about that show?
We’re really stoked about the Brooklyn show. It will be our first show in New York in over three years. It’s nice for that to be the closing show of this big US tour. We’re playing with Dinosaur Jr. and Kuroma. It’s going to be pretty sweet. I hope all my friends can come.

Are you going to get some time off after that show?
We don’t get much time off until mid-January. We are going to Australia and Japan over New Year’s. I hope I can get some surfing in. I have some friends in Sydney and I hope we can get in the water.

What is it about surfing that you fell in love with?
I already loved the ocean and being in nature. I was into skateboarding and snowboarding when I was a kid, so this is the perfect thing for me. It’s therapeutic to just sit out there, even by yourself in 30 degree water.

What should people expect when they go to a MGMT show?
It’s gotten to a good point where it’s a combination of songs from all three of the albums we have put out. We play with a six-piece band. It all works well together, especially the visuals behind us. We’ve been having some of the best shows we’ve ever played in the last couple months. I’m anxious to show everyone in New York how far we’ve come since 2010.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 13, 2013, 09:29:43 AM
http://au.news.yahoo.com/entertainment/a/20306051/mgmt-reflect-on-reality-before-aussie-tour/ (http://au.news.yahoo.com/entertainment/a/20306051/mgmt-reflect-on-reality-before-aussie-tour/)

Life could all be just one big hologram.

So muses MGMT's Andrew VanWyngarden as he reflects on the inspiration behind Your Life Is a Lie, a song on the psychedelic pop rock act's self-titled album.

The other half of MGMT, Ben Goldwasser, sings and plays keyboard, while VanWyngarden is the lead vocalist, lyricist and guitarist.

VanWyngarden opens Your Life Is a Lie: "Here's the deal/Open your eyes/Your life is a lie/Don't say a word/I'll tell you why/You're living a lie/Your life is a lie."

He says he wrote the song in about 45 seconds in front of a campfire.

"It seems to have manifested out of some sort of subconscious frustration with something," VanWyngarden says.

"I don't know, I think maybe monotony, or a kind of routine, or just kind of a feeling of floating through life."

He adds that he recently read an article about physicists who suggest the universe could in fact be a hologram.

"A new study has come out from scientists who have evidence now that it's more likely that our reality is just a giant hologram than it's not.

"It (Your Life Is A Lie) kind of fits in with that.

"Who knows really what reality is?"

MGMT is the group's third album, following Oracular Spectacular in 2008 and Congratulations two years later.

VanWyngarden says the record is not meant to be a defining statement about the group, despite being self-titled.

"We thought it was kind of a rock and roll cliche, a self-titled album, and we had to do one so we did."

The album also features Plenty of Girls In The Sea, in which VanWyngarden sings: "The trick is to try and be free."

He says the song is a reflection on feeling like the grass is always greener on the other side, whether you are in a relationship or single.

MGMT will play at The Falls Music & Arts Festival later this month and then head to Southbound in Busselton.

During Your Life Is a Lie, an audience member will have the honour of playing a giant cow bell the band has taken on tour.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 17, 2013, 05:37:47 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/arts/music/mgmt-performs-at-barclays-center.html?smid=fb-share (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/arts/music/mgmt-performs-at-barclays-center.html?smid=fb-share)

Wide Repertory Invites Plenty of Meandering
MGMT Performs at Barclays Center
(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2013/12/16/arts/MGMT/MGMT-popup.jpg)
A handful of hit singles gives a band some leeway, and MGMT used all it has at Barclays Center on Friday. MGMT — led by the singer Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, who both play guitars and keyboards — strategically doled out the three hits from its 2008 debut album, “Oracular Spectacular”: “Time to Pretend” early in the set and “Electric Feel” and “Kids” near the end, each one drawing arena-wide squeals of recognition.

In between, MGMT plunged into the musical and verbal convolutions that make up far more of the band’s repertory. While the hits lean toward 1970s pop, most of MGMT’s other songs put new twists into the already labyrinthine legacy of psychedelic pop. It’s not bait and switch; MGMT’s albums have always revealed its woolier side. But the band — which has been mostly touring theaters with 2,000 to 3,000 seats, not arenas like Barclays — now has two different constituencies: those who know the happy-sounding hits and those who are willing to follow the band’s more abstruse ambitions.

On its second album, “Congratulations” in 2010, MGMT stepped away from writing choruses and keyboard hooks, choosing instead to build songs as a string of verses — often two or three contrasting ones — with arrangements that grow more elaborate each time around, like a theme and variations. Mr. VanWyngarden’s lyrics turned gloomier and were particularly skeptical about success and materialism. “Mass adulation not so funny/Poisoned honey,” he shrieked at the end of “Flash Delirium,” the set’s opening song. “Congratulations” also included a 12-minute suite, “Siberian Breaks,” that tested the crowd’s attention before MGMT regained it with “Electric Feel.”

“MGMT,” the band’s 2013 album, kept its songs shorter and somewhat less meandering, with more obvious refrains. But those refrains can be bleak — like that of “Mystery Disease” — and MGMT still isn’t courting a mass market. It unearthed “Introspection,” the title song from a 1968 album of psychedelic pop that had become a collector’s item, “Introspection: A Faine Jade Recital.” And on Friday, it brought out Faine Jade himself to play guitar and sing along on it while much of the audience wondered who he was.


The band performed calmly and meticulously, offering more musicianship than showmanship as it summoned echoes of the late-1960s Beach Boys, early Pink Floyd, the Byrds, the Beatles and considerably more obscure ’60s artifacts. Bright colors rippled and flashed across the video screen overhead. And when MGMT got to “Kids,” its poppy and arty missions converged. The song’s perky keyboard line and lyrics hinting at environmental consciousness for a young generation — “Control yourself/Take only what you need from it” — had the whole arena singing along; then, using the momentum of the bass line, MGMT went into a one-chord jam full of layered rhythms from staccato keyboards, hypnotic and propulsive in the zone where kraut-rock and disco overlap. It was something for everyone in the arena.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on December 17, 2013, 10:26:44 PM
http://www.busseltonmail.com.au/story/1978807/mgmt-southbound-set-to-be-bands-first-wa-visit/?cs=1435 (http://www.busseltonmail.com.au/story/1978807/mgmt-southbound-set-to-be-bands-first-wa-visit/?cs=1435)

AMERICAN psychedelic-pop band MGMT hit the international stage after their debut album Oracular Spectacular in 2007.

Now with three albums under their belt – Congratulations in 2010 and self-titled MGMT released this year, the band are preparing for their visually stunning set at Southbound Festival in the early new year.

Founding member and multi-talented vocalist, guitarist and keyboard player Benjamin Goldwasser spoke with the Mail’s entertainment reporter, Tasha Campbell, about how the band is looking forward to visiting Western Australia for the annual festival.

Will this be your first trip to Busselton in Western Australia?

I believe so yeah, we've only been to Byron Bay before so we're really excited to come down; it should be a good time. It will be nice for us to get a little warm weather too, it will be great.

Being your first time to play Southbound festival – what are you looking forward to the most?

Everything I’ve heard about the festival. It sounds like it’s a really good airing for what we do with our live shows and I have a good feeling about it.

Do you prefer playing festivals or sideshows?

It’s nice to have a mixture – we’ve been doing a lot of our own shows over the last couple of months but we started out this year doing mostly festivals so we’ve had a pretty good taste of both.  We feel confident enough with the show that I think it’s going to be really fun to do festivals, although I think sometimes that festivals can be a little stressful for us when we’re having technical difficulties and when people are expecting a spectacle that’s seamless. But we can’t wait to come over.

Do you have a favourite album to play out of your three?

The new one because it’s the best we’ve been able to represent ourselves and we had a really good time making it and I think we really put in as much work as we needed to make it the way we wanted to. It still does something to me when I go back and listen to it – I still find new things in it, which is the first time that has really happened. I think in the past when we have made music we’re ready to just be done with it and once we’ve finished it we don’t really want to hear it anymore.

What do you think has changed across them?

I think we’ve always been trying new things and I think in a lot of ways we are the same people but we now have more perspective and I think when I go back and listen to some of the earlier stuff we’ve done I can hear how we were trying to do something that didn’t quite get there and I’ll always hear things that I would have done differently. I’m sure it will be the same when I go back in a few years and listen to this album but we just keep growing, however I do still like our old music.

What can the Southbound crowds expect from MGMT?

It’s a really cool show these days – it’s just musically really tight and we’re having a lot of fun on stage and we’ve been playing with the same musicians for a long time now so we’re feeling each other really well and we have a really good visual show. Our friend Ella is doing our live projections behind us so she performs it live with the music in response to what we’re doing and there’s a lot of interactive stuff going on so it’s pretty neat.

What is the most rewarding thing about being an artist?

The fact that we get to play so much music and second to that would be getting to do a lot of travel. But if I had any other job I would still be wishing I had more time to play music – wait, I still wish I had more time to play music now.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 26, 2013, 08:18:36 AM
http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/change-of-pace-puts-mgmt-back-in-control-20131226-2zxrz.html (http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/change-of-pace-puts-mgmt-back-in-control-20131226-2zxrz.html)

Change of pace puts MGMT back in control
The indie poppers are out to prove they're not Kids any more.

It's easy to think of MGMT as one of those "I like your old stuff better than your new stuff" bands. But the truth is, they haven't maintained a particular sound or style for more than one album at a time. Each of their three releases has been entirely different from the former.
"It just changes naturally," says Andrew VanWyngarden, who with Ben Goldwasser makes up US indie poppers MGMT. "Every time we've sat down to write an album we've had different things that are influencing and inspiring us."
Their 2008 debut, Oracular Spectacular, spawned the mammoth pop singles Kids and Time to Pretend, and the band were named by Rolling Stone as a top 10 "artist to watch". Then, in 2010, their second release, Congratulations, left fans confused, as the feel-good festival songs were dropped for an ambitious and psychedelic romp.
With the third album, the self-titled MGMT, the pair shed their skin again and emerged fearless and satisfied. "For the first and second albums, there was definitely anxiety from not really knowing what was going to happen," says VanWyngarden. "We didn't want that to be a part of the process this time. We didn't want to think about some stupid critic somewhere, or what other people were going to think."
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Compiled from hours of improvisation, toying with guitars, synthesisers and drum machines, MGMT are happy with the results – and they don't mind showing it: "I think it'll turn some people off, but I really like it. No harm can come from being proud and confident in something you've made."
MGMT last visited Australia in 2011, playing at Future Music Festival, but they're now returning to headline Falls Festival and the duo are relishing the change in pace. "I'm relieved," says VanWyngarden. "Falls seems like it's much more in line with the vibe of our band."
So how does a band choreograph a festival set that encompasses such a diverse range of albums? "It's a challenge, but I'm very satisfied with how we've put together a show that seems to make everybody happy," says VanWyngarden. "It's songs from every era of our band, and the way we've been writing the set list, it flows nicely. It doesn't really feel like there's one thing that's out of place."
Audiences can also expect to see the performance enhanced by technicolour visuals, created by artist and long-time collaborator Alejandro Crawford. "We're not the kind of people who jump around on stage and scream at the audience to put their hands in the air," says VanWyngarden.
The duo have even taken the visual element one step further and released The Optimiser, an album-length video accompaniment to MGMT. Featuring colourful visuals and psychedelic imagery, the idea is that fans can sit back, relax, and enjoy the full MGMT "experience" from the comfort of their own home.
"It's really helped consolidate our live show into more of an experience. We put the album out and figured, why not do that to the recorded songs, too?" says VanWyngarden. "We're in our own heads, playing our own music. This helps to get people onto the same wavelength as us."


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/change-of-pace-puts-mgmt-back-in-control-20131226-2zxrz.html#ixzz2oaR0cnLJ (http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/change-of-pace-puts-mgmt-back-in-control-20131226-2zxrz.html#ixzz2oaR0cnLJ)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 07, 2014, 07:13:01 PM
http://www.newspressnow.com/life/st_joe_live/music/article_eb1931b7-0ce6-5330-9541-c7a7bb1a0097.html (http://www.newspressnow.com/life/st_joe_live/music/article_eb1931b7-0ce6-5330-9541-c7a7bb1a0097.html)

Songs that capture a generation

Posted: Thursday, March 6, 2014 11:55 pm | Updated: 2:31 pm, Fri Mar 7, 2014.
By Shea Conner | St. Joe Live | 0 comments

Every now and then, we're allowed to run off with a really crazy concept for an article here at St. Joe Live. Well, this one was certainly crazy. It was also frustrating, thought-provoking and darn near impossible.
For this story, we asked local musicians, writers and those close to the music scene — of all ages and backgrounds — one simple question: "What song from your generation best captures your generation?"
Maybe it was foolish and pretentious of us to think there are songs that embody an entire swath of very different individuals. Actually, it is. But the point of this question was to generate a discussion that would help fill in the musical generation gaps and get people to bust or confirm stereotypes about their own generations. It also would allow people to opine about their peers and essentially create a very meaningful setlist influenced by history and sociology.
The results were, well, not what we expected.
Most simply didn't respond. Some said they'd give it some thought before ultimately choosing not to retort. Some answered the question with little or no elaboration. Some answered the question by not answering the question, and some were offended that we posed such a query in the first place.
But, ultimately, a brave few picked one song that they felt best summed up their formative era. We are saluting those intrepid souls by printing their contributions, as well as our own takes on this whole generational anthem thing. What we learned was that young music fans thought a lot about this, '90s kids almost unanimously crowned Nirvana and people who grew up in the '60s and '70s didn't even bother trying to narrow it down. Take a look.

Shea Conner, St. Joe Live writer

The Millennial Generation (or Generation Y) has often been described in labels that aren't so flattering. We're arrogant. We're weak. We're lazy. We're self-obsessed. At least that's how our older peers have often defined us.
Frankly, I just don't think they know us that well.
We're not arrogant. We're confident. Maybe it's because we grew up watching rappers, rockers and professional athletes make their boastful declarations with an utter lack of remorse. Or maybe it's because confidence plays a key role in achieving career aspirations and it's been pounded into our heads by nearly every authority figure we've met since we were teenagers.
We're not weak. We're impressionable, compassionate and open-minded. My generation was the first to be raised with an entire world at its fingertips, and we've absorbed various types of culture, art, history and silly Internet things like a sponge. What we lack in wisdom, we make up for with increasing self-awareness and eagerness.
We're not lazy. We're not self-obsessed. We're dreamers who have been encouraged to never stop chasing their aspirations. In an intimidating world that's overwhelmingly connected, economically baffling and full of uncertainty, my generation has placed a greater value in the pursuit of happiness. Perhaps that's why MGMT's "Time to Pretend" will always make such a lasting impression on me.
"I'm feelin' rough, I'm feelin' raw, I'm in the prime of my life. Let's make some music, make some money, find some models for wives." From the very first lines of the song, MGMT's Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser set out to establish a feeling of invincibility and optimism as they fantasize about becoming rockstar folk heroes. As the title "Time to Pretend" implies, the song is a daydream, but the duo makes you feel as if that daydream is never quite out of reach.
"Yeah, it's overwhelming, but what else can we do? Get jobs in offices and wake up for the morning commute?" We've seen previous generations immerse themselves in jobs that were just that — jobs. So many people have locked themselves up in occupational prisons because the money was good. In the past, security defined success. That's not the case anymore. Our generation whole-heartedly believes that if you can make a living by doing something deeply rewarding, you've already prospered.
Throughout the rest of the song, MGMT laments about feelings of inadequacy and false idolization while also fondly recalling authentic love. I find this quite poignant because, as I age, I'm learning that it's not about how cool people think I am or the number of Facebook friends I have that's meaningful, but rather the lasting relationships I'm making. That's tough to grasp in this new world that places more stock in the quantity of kinships rather than the quality.
Even the music of "Time to Pretend" feels unique to the time period. It's a mix of electronic dance with big strokes of psychedelia, pop and garage rock. Like so much of the great music of this era, it's a display of today's technological influence while also serving as a nod to the past. Honestly, why would we want to ignore such amazing influences?
In the end, the protagonists find that their dreams weren't all they were cracked up to be. They were inevitably "fated to pretend." More than anything, "Time to Pretend" details a crash with reality and the fact that nothing comes easy. That's something we're still largely struggling to deal with, but MGMT gave us fair warning.
Either that, or it's just a song about a bunch of arrogant, weak, lazy, self-obsessed losers who won't grow the hell up.
Andrew Gaug, St. Joe Live writer
Speaking for Generation Y, I'd go with Outkast's "Hey Ya," not only because it was one of the best (and most played) songs of the '00s, but because it captured the feelings of the generation so well.
Taking it on a facetious level, it's a super fun tune with its Beatles-like melody, call-and-response, two-word chorus and funky dance breakdown. Despite its sunny demeanor, it's a song about chasing thrills and the inevitable emptiness associated with the fact that there's no emotional investment.
In our budding and then full-blown Internet age, you could find something for any specific thrill that you were seeking out. It was unlike anything any previous generation experienced.
Even though technology brought more stimulation, we still proved to be an unhappy generation (hence, the emo movement of the 2000s, with its overbearing and often juvenile lyrics), but we were afraid to show that on the surface.
If you saw us on the street, we appeared happy. If you looked at our AOL Instant Messenger or Myspace profiles or read our texts and personal e-mail, there was a sense of longing for something deeper.
Underneath the cheery facade of "Hey Ya," there's a feeling of darkness that could easily be overlooked if you didn't take the time to actually invest yourself in the material.
Happy people could just ignore the lyrics and like Andre 3000 says, "Y'all don't want to hear me, you just want to dance." While those that dug deeper saw questions like "If what they say is/'Nothing lasts forever'/then what makes/love the exception?"
"Hey Ya," like our generation, played both sides of the fence -- endearingly happy, while frustrated underneath as it learned the old adage that what comes easy doesn't last. At some point, you have to get out of the Caddy and meet the person's daddy. It's something we're still learning.
Kevin Krauskopf, former St. Joe Live writer
I've found this to be an almost impossible question to answer. By the time I started high school in 1998, the popularity of bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and the Smashing Pumpkins was no longer at its peak. Rap/metal happened, briefly, and then the Blink-182s of the music world took over — and were any of them good enough to carry the mantle for an entire generation?
No. No, they weren't.
But then one particular artist popped into my head. Dave Grohl. I almost immediately dismissed him as too obvious a choice, but who else better bridges the gap between generations for those of us who don't particularly identify with any one of them?
Far from my favorite song in the Foo Fighters catalog, "Learn to Fly" still nails it on what it was like to come of age in the late '90s and early '00s. As Shea put it, the Digital Revolution changed everything — and us 20- and 30-somethings were shoved from the plane without a parachute into this rapidly evolving world.
Fortunately, we learned to fly before we crashed and burned. We had to find our own way — older generations no better understood this new world than us — and it took some time. Maybe that's why we came off at first as brash, arrogant and narcissistic. With the world quite literally a click away in this digital era, however, we were exposed to so many different ways of thinking. We also saw more clearly, and came to detest, the harsh oppression of those who didn't conform. Thus, we gave up on the "make your own way" ideal, embraced our differences and decided our best way forward is together.
And that's why Grohl's line "Fly along with me, I can't quite make it alone / Try to make this life my own" resonates so deeply.
Corey Riley, Blue Oyster Culture Club
Hands down, Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit." No other song has made an entire basement full of stinking pubescent teenagers stop and actually listen. It changed everything.
Amy Heath, co-owner of The Lucky Tiger
I was smack dab in the middle of Gen X. It was a generation that only had top 40 stations, and if you wanted to hear something different, you traded tapes and sent away for a whole label's discography. It was the fall of my sophomore year when "Smells Like Teen Spirit" hit and it seemed like everything changed overnight.
I would say it really was the anthem for my particular generation, and even though it is not what represents me personally or my favorite, that is THE song. I cannot see much argument on this if you went to high school in the early- to mid-'90s.
Danny Phillips, local music critic
For me, as I stare hard at 40, Nirvana's "Negative Creep" from their debut "Bleach" speaks to my generation. Most would probably go to "Teen Spirit," but for me, when I heard "Negative Creep" it described me and where I was at the time: It was dark, had a heavy riff and, above all, it was pissed off.
Nirvana came along at a perfect time for me and "Negative Creep" was the song that lit my fuse. When I think of my youth, think about days gone by that have shaped me, it's "Negative Creep" setting the scene of the movie.
Todd Ward, The GasTown Lamps
"Fell In Love With a Girl" by The White Stripes and "Last Night" by The Strokes. Those bands kicked off a resurgence of rock in the early 2000s and put the final death nail in rap metal. The influence of that era is still reverberating throughout music, both underground and mainstream.
Matthew Coman, The Wood Pile
I want to pick a song that most people would be aware of, but I keep coming back to a song called "Here" by VAST. That was during a very formative time in my life. I was 15 when I first heard this band.
The song, to me, is about feeling a state of paralysis when being bombarded with information. I think it's an analysis of the digital age, and the feeling of not knowing what to believe. At the same time that it speaks to this paralysis, it also speaks to the feeling of joy for living in a time that is sort of chaotic. You're not sure who or what to trust, but you're happy you're along for the ride. This band really left an impression on me.
Ryan Richardson, DJ and writer for The Joplin Globe
I was just off the cusp of being part of the vaunted Generation X that seemed to epitomize cool when I was a teenager. The millennials, in their short time here, have already become alien to me to the point I don't relate to their values. Born in 1981, I land squarely in the middle of the lost Generation Y.
My generation is pulled into two different directions. We're the ones buying up vinyl records because they epitomized our childhood and then disappeared with it too. We're the ones who embraced the computer age with open arms and wide wonder because that technology matured with us. We were too young to be completely cynical like our Gen X counterparts who had worked under the assumption that they could expect less than their parents. But we're too old to be blissfully ignorant of the squandered potential of all the technology and information that had finally been placed within our grasp. We're dutiful wanderers née slackers, with no direction home.
The single "1979" off of The Smashing Pumpkins double LP "Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness" was credibly the first taste of that aimless feeling that I never have been able to shake since. Four years earlier, Cobain had screamed "Here we are now, entertain us" and Billy Corgan responded in earnest by giving us the justification on why we were so listless in the first place.
This song didn't feature the soft verse, loud chorus we had been groomed to expect during the rise and fall of grunge. This was the same, steady drumbeat from start to finish. It was Corgan, speaking on our behalf while speaking to us at the same time, flashing us soft-spoken realizations that no direction still put us at the same place as everyone before and after us. The song was a heartbeat, keeping perfect time until the end until it evaporated leaving nothing behind. We were told it was going to be ok to be vacant and bored, while residing in the land of 1000 guilts.
Corgan and his bandmates were poster boys for late Generation X'ers, but in this song he bridged the gap to his younger siblings and told us it was OK to not expect it all to work out. When the Baby Boomers looked down their noses at them citing squandered potential, they were looking to us with an encouraging nod. They were saying that they still believed we could figure it out.
And if even if we didn't immediately, everything would still be there when we did.
Steven Garcia, Deco Auto
"Where the Streets Have No Name" by U2 from "The Joshua Tree."
First, the sheer poetry of the lyrics: "I want to reach out and touch the flame. Where the streets have no name. Ah! Ah! Ah!"
Hmm... OK. That's not so great. How 'bout this: "We're still building then burning down love. Burning down love. And when I go there, I go there with you. It's all I can do."
No, that's pretty bad too. In fact, it's pretty damn awful. So why this song?
Well, this won't speak for everyone in Generation X, only those of us who hoped and prayed for something just a tiny, itty-bit different than what everyone else was listening to.
For us Midwestern Generation X-ers who weren't digging on classic rock, hair metal or Top 40 in the '80s, there wasn't much else as an alternative. There was some really underground stuff, but it was hard to find and difficult to purchase. So, we mostly contented ourselves with what little major labels had to offer. It was fairly decent. We had Depeche Mode and The Cure, The Replacements and Soul Asylum, R.E.M. and The Smithereens. And of course, we had U2.
In 1987, it had already been seven years since their debut "Boy" (and only liars said they knew it when it came out). It had been four long years since their last really crucial album "War." By the late '80s, U2 had already become fairly commonplace, and really, quite boring. The first two singles off "The Joshua Tree" ("With or Without You" and "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For") did little to change that opinion. Moms were clearly enjoying this record!
Finally, they released "Where the Streets Have No Name" and it sounded positively punk by comparison. Of course, that's obvious hyperbole, but the drums were pounding, the bass was thunking and Bono gave his best impersonation of someone who cared. And for those of us stuck in Northwest Missouri, if the choice was between a mock-edgy single by U2, or something by Poison, we gladly went with the former.
It wasn't groundbreaking. It wasn't mind-expanding. It wasn't even all that exciting. But it wasn't bad, and that was pretty good.
Bob Shultz, Missouri Music Hall of Fame
I've got to go with Todd Snider's “Talkin' Seattle Grunge Rock Blues.”
It's the Folk-Alt-Rock-Americana comedic journey of a group of guys trying to make in the record industry on the heels of Nirvana.
Snider perfectly captures the time and place of that weird, brief chapter of the recording industry where everyone seemingly drops the leather-clad pants and tosses on the flannel for a chance at stardom.
The song follows this group of untalented musicians as they wind through the final days of MTV when MTV actually played music — that time when anyone and their untalented brother was getting their own “Unplugged” specials in between “Real World” marathons.
It so defines Generation X-ers who were using the growing Internet technology, and not really saying anything.
Snider's chorus refrain from Neil Young's “Into the Blue and Into the Black” puts the story firmly into "tongue-in-cheek" territory. It brilliantly highlights and predicts the coming storm of post-Seattle bands that would lead the rock genre for the next decade. Take out the fictional band and replace it with "Smashing Pumpkins," "Creed," or "Nickelback" and it is a fairly accurate attack on the lameness of the coming storm of music and my generation's ability to put them there.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 20, 2014, 06:33:38 PM
I often find myself scratching my head when bands are compared to MGMT because I just don't get the comparisons.  I know that many of you disagree with me about EOTS-I think they're a cheap rip off, but some of my very fave people love them, so I won't bash them further.  Anyway, I enjoy Foster (I hate Pumped Up Kicks) but for very different reasons that I like MGMT.  I understand the sort of crossover comparison in this article and I think it has a couple of interesting tidbits, so I'm posting it. 

http://www.stereogum.com/1670848/the-week-in-pop-the-mis-mgmt-of-foster-the-people/franchises/the-week-in-pop/ (http://www.stereogum.com/1670848/the-week-in-pop-the-mis-mgmt-of-foster-the-people/franchises/the-week-in-pop/)

The Week In Pop: The Mis-MGMT Of Foster The People
Mar 20th '14 by Chris DeVille

Every few years, a musician achieves that rare combination of commercial dominance and critical acclaim — and therefore inspires lots of copycats — only to willfully retreat from the spotlight. This usually involves making an album designed to alienate mainstream audiences and/or distance the originator from the imitators. It also tends to create a vacuum into which those imitators can leap, allowing them to bask in commercial success for a while until everyone stops searching for “the new _____.” Nirvana and Pearl Jam attempted this maneuver in 1993 with the abrasive In Utero and the video-free Vs. respectively, clearing the way for Stone Temple Pilots, Live, and Bush to satiate the public’s bubblegrunge hunger. When Radiohead famously muffled Thom Yorke’s heavenly falsetto and handcuffed Jonny Greenwood’s spastic six-string theatrics on 2000′s Kid A, the world had no shortage of potential “new Radioheads” to choose from. And when constant hitmaker Kanye West flipped the digital middle finger that was Yeezus last year, urban radio programmers found workable substitutes in Yeezy facsimiles such as Big Sean and J. Cole.

MGMT’s Oracular Spectacular was the sort of world-conquering unanimous favorite you rarely see anymore, an album that crossed over from alt-rock channels to produce three inescapable pop hits, each of which also cracked the Pazz & Jop critics’ poll’s top 50. (The album itself finished in the critics’ top 20.) MGMT’s psych-tinged dance-pop was everywhere — on the radio, at dance parties, in seemingly every ad on TV. But when the duo decided to muffle its formidable pop powers on 2010 follow-up Congratulations in favor of an insular psych and post-punk odyssey, there was an opportunity for MGMT clones to run rampant on the pop charts. Some of them (Empire Of The Sun) were more palatable than others (Capital Cities). Some (STRFKR) took over for MGMT in the TV sync department but couldn’t replicate their chart success; others (Portugal. The Man) broke at alternative radio but couldn’t crack the top 40. You could make a good case that Oracular Spectacular paved the way for the embrace of Passion Pit and Vampire Weekend beyond their original niche audience. But no one seized the post-MGMT moment quite like Foster The People.



Mark Foster was literally writing commercial jingles for a living when he concocted “Pumped Up Kicks,” an incandescent morsel of programming department catnip that became for 2011 what “Time To Pretend,” “Electric Feel,” and “Kids” were for 2008. It was expertly engineered to dominate that marginally psychedelic, synth-driven pop-rock niche that MGMT had vacated, all the way down to its nonsensical lyrics about children. Peaking at #3 on the Hot 100 singles chart, “Pumped Up Kicks” was a pop cultural money train that even Foster’s historically awkward SNL stage presence couldn’t derail. (To be genealogically fair, “Pumped Up Kicks” also leaned heavily on the breezy lightness of Peter Bjorn And John’s whistlin’ wonder “Young Folks,” another song you could run from but couldn’t hide from at the height of indie gentrification.) Alas, the song also marked Foster The People as a surefire one-hit wonder. Torches, the eminently acceptable album anchored by “Pumped Up Kicks,” yielded four other singles, but only one of them cracked the Hot 100 singles chart. That song, “Don’t Stop (Color On The Walls),” only made it to #86.

If you can remember Foster The People’s second performance on SNL at all, you’re more likely to remember that Kenny G joined them than you are to recall which song they played. (That’d be “Houdini,” a song that lived up to its name by quickly disappearing from radio playlists without a trace.) Still, on the strength of “Pumped Up Kicks” alone, Foster The People became a name brand bankable enough to pack 5,000-capacity venues and appear near the top of the Coachella poster on the same line as commercial powerhouses such as Pharrell, Lorde, Skrillex, and Queens Of The Stone Age (and above MGMT, incidentally). Thus, now comes Supermodel, a sophomore album carrying a weight of expectations it can’t possibly begin to shoulder.

Like Torches before it, Supermodel is sleek, shiny, and professional in every way. That state-of-the-art veneer is no doubt partially due to the continued involvement of British producer Paul Epworth, who got his start producing mid-aughts dance-punk blokes like Bloc Party and the Futureheads then ascended the ranks until Adele’s 21 made him one of pop’s most in-demand guiding lights. Epworth is now the guy you bring in if, like U2, you’re a rock band vying to be a commercial powerhouse in a climate when almost no rock bands pull that kind of weight. “I promised I would rid the world of feral animals,” Foster sings on the surprisingly shoegazey “Pseudologia Fantastica,” but Epworth is just as likely the one shaving down the teeth here.



And you can be sure that Supermodel is an album without bite, one built to placate the lowest common denominator and keep Foster swimming in licensing money. That’s not to say it lacks ideas. When Foster isn’t directly milking the old MGMT sound on tracks like “Nevermind” and “Best Friend,” he does experiment here and there. “A Beginner’s Guide To Destroying The Moon” borrows Clams Casino’s beat from A$AP Rocky’s “LVL,” but the song Foster builds on top of it is even more of a slog than Rocky’s. “Goats In Trees” is a uniquely bleary ballad haunted by stirring ghostly samples, but also by Foster’s less than stellar vocal performance. The Beatlesesque choral arrangement on the interlude “The Angelic Welcome Of Mr. Jones” is beautiful but fleeting, and a stab at replicating Vampire Weekend’s pan-global pop-rock on opener “Are You What You Want To Be?” turns out better than it has any right to. Only the aforementioned shoegaze turn on “Pseudologia Fantastica” suggests a fascinating way forward, but even that could pass for a hazy rewrite of “Weekend Wars.”

But Foster is far better at setting a mood than he is at writing timeless pop songs. He can keep deploying his trusty “Electric Feel” gang vocals to shroud his own vocal weaknesses (and on the grating “Ask Yourself,” he really should have), but all those voices can’t hide the absence of a melody as indelible as “Pumped Up Kicks.” Thus, he ends up with singles like “Coming Of Age,” a ditty with all the ingratiating propulsion of “Kicks” but no substance to latch onto. It stalled out short of the Hot 100 and feels more like arrested development than a coming of age. The main difference between timeless pop music and soulless product is a genuine spark of inspiration, and that tends to run out when you’re riding someone else’s coattails. The artists that manage to get out of somebody else’s shadow are the ones who find their own identities — say what you want about Muse, but don’t say they sound like Radiohead anymore. Foster The People make some half-hearted attempts at such reinvention on Supermodel, but mostly they sound like they’re trying their hardest to be the band MGMT is doing their damnedest not to be.

Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: Fairytale of Hurt on March 20, 2014, 06:39:25 PM
That last sentence is pretty powerful.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on March 21, 2014, 04:53:03 PM
You know what?  I didn't hate it. I think it's exaggerated because I don't think they put that much effort but I didn't hate it
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on June 27, 2014, 07:24:21 AM
A quickie with MGMT's lead singer about their upcoming trip to South Africa
2014-06-27 07:00
by Alex Isaacs

Cape Town – In case you missed it, MGMT are coming to South Africa for two festivals later this year.

We were offered the opportunity to speak to the lead singer of the Grammy-award-winning band: Andrew VanWyngarden while the electronic rockers are on tour in Eastern Europe.

He told us about his influences, what touristy things he's looking forward to doing in mzansi and explained the video for one of their latest singles.

Channel24:
We’re so excited for your first shows on South African soil at Vodacom in The City and Rocking the Daisies this October.

Are there any fun activities that you have planned other than rocking the stage, like shark cage diving or something crazy?

Andrew:
I’m excited and really happy (to be playing in South Africa).

That’s the first question everyone has been asking us (laughs) not specifically shark cage diving though. I would like to do that! Let’s do it!

Channel24:
You’ve played music festivals from Glastonbury to Coachella, what do you like about festival shows and why say yes to festival shows in South Africa?

Andrew:
Well, we’ve never been to South Africa or even the continent of Africa so it seemed like a great trip to make and that’ll be sort-of-a once in a lifetime experience or maybe it’s not. Maybe we’ll come back, that would be cool too.

I’ve heard so much about it through surfing and I don’t know, just excited to check it out, have a new experience. (Sic)

Channel24:
We love your tweets with different music videos, which artists inspired your latest self-titled album, MGMT?

Andrew:
Oh man, so many so many different ones...I think in terms of the kind of layers of sound on the latest album it’s kind-of influenced by a lot of early 90s bands like AR Cane and this English band called Disco Inferno.

I think both those bands do this multi layered...non standard way of making chords and we’re using a lot of analogue synthesizers, there’s this one called the Phoenix and other bands who use it like Aphex Twin and some other electronic artists (have been influential).

Channel24:
One of your latest singles, off that album, Cool Song 2 has a beautiful video that we love. Could you tell us more about it, what’s the story behind it?

Andrew:
It’s different from any other video that we’ve had. The director Isaiah Seret he came up with the story line after we went back and forth a bit but it was really his idea.

I think it’s kind of like a love story that takes the form of this weird disease happening. This guy turning into a tree and this other guy trying to save him. I think it’s really cool, (it’s a shame) that we weren’t actually at the shoot because we got to film at this beautiful place in Los Angeles where this guy doesn’t usually let people film.

Yeah, all in all it has a pretty unsettling vibe but it fits the song so well (sic).

And that’s it for our quickie, thanks Andrew.

Here's all the information you need about the MGMT shows in South Africa. http://www.channel24.co.za/Music/News/Rocking-the-Daisies-announces-big-international-headliner-20140624 (http://www.channel24.co.za/Music/News/Rocking-the-Daisies-announces-big-international-headliner-20140624)

http://www.channel24.co.za/Music/News/A-quickie-with-MGMTs-lead-singer-about-their-upcoming-trip-to-South-Africa-20140626 (http://www.channel24.co.za/Music/News/A-quickie-with-MGMTs-lead-singer-about-their-upcoming-trip-to-South-Africa-20140626)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on July 07, 2014, 09:40:48 AM
http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a582572/opener-festival-2014-live-review-sensible-option-for-british-fans.html#~oJl7zCaOrItN93 (http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a582572/opener-festival-2014-live-review-sensible-option-for-british-fans.html#~oJl7zCaOrItN93)

MGMT's main stage slot, meanwhile, is a sun-drenched marriage made in heaven, the woozy, dappled psychedelia of second album Congratulations floating out like a gorgeously gauzy dream, while even the inevitable roars of approval for 'Kids' and 'Electric Feel' don't seem quite as depressingly out of sync as on UK turf.
(http://i2.cdnds.net/14/28/618x412/451670310.jpg)


Read more: http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a582572/opener-festival-2014-live-review-sensible-option-for-british-fans.html#~oJl7zCaOrItN93#ixzz36nGRcXXu (http://www.digitalspy.com/music/news/a582572/opener-festival-2014-live-review-sensible-option-for-british-fans.html#~oJl7zCaOrItN93#ixzz36nGRcXXu)
Follow us: @digitalspy on Twitter | digitalspyuk on Facebook
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on August 17, 2014, 06:52:06 AM
http://www.timeslive.co.za/entertainment/music/2014/08/14/music-will-grow-with-you-and-you-can-t-stay-the-same-mgmt (http://www.timeslive.co.za/entertainment/music/2014/08/14/music-will-grow-with-you-and-you-can-t-stay-the-same-mgmt)

Music will grow with you and you can't stay the same: MGMT
Nikita Ramkissoon | 14 August, 2014 11:09

Call their sound synth-punk, electro-pop, or Cynthia. MGMT don't give a bleep, writes Nikita Ramkissoon


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Music will grow with you and you can't stay the same: MGMT
Nikita Ramkissoon | 14 August, 2014 11:09

DEEPLY FLOORED: Ben Goldwasser, left, and Andrew Van Wyngarden
Image by: GALLO/GETTY IMAGES
Call their sound synth-punk, electro-pop, or Cynthia. MGMT don't give a bleep, writes Nikita Ramkissoon

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In 2007, Facebook and MySpace changed the science of music marketing forever. That year, the American duo MGMT - keyboardist Ben Goldwasser and singer-guitarist Andrew Van Wyngarden - were among the first bands to surf the social-media wave with their hit debut album, Oracular Spectacular .

MGMT's rapid rise to indie fame was an early textbook example of the power of the viral music video - though they say it was a phenomenon beyond their control.

" When we found out that this was how people were discovering our music, we didn't have a clue how it worked - but it did, " says Goldwasser, on the line from Croatia.

The band's third album, simply titled MGMT, was released last year. In October they will tour South Africa, playing Vodacom In The City at Johannesburg's Mary Fitzgerald Square, and Rocking the Daisies at Cloof Wine Estate in Darling, Western Cape.

On subsequent albums they were joined in studio by band members Matthew Asti, James Richardson and Will Berman.

The big hits on Oracular Spectacular - Kids , Time to Pretend and Electric Feel - are still dancefloor fixtures in South African clubs.
"We've changed a lot since then" says Goldwasser. "But those songs still ring true to what we were at the time."

In 2010, the boys from Connecticut released their second offering, Congratulations. "Writing a follow-up to something so successful is hard," says Goldwasser.

"You are going to be judged. People are anticipating what you're going to do, wondering what's going to follow. The critics are armed and ready, and it's easy to get caught up in the critical backlash - so we needed to follow our gut on the next one."

Congratulations, although not as commercially successful as Oracular Spectacular, was critically acclaimed. Goldwasser attributes this to not sticking to a formula.

"We don't have a style," he says. "It's rock, synth, indie, pop. Whatever it may be, the important thing is that it is its own beast.

"We grow as musicians and as people, so naturally - if you're writing from a place of honesty - the music will grow with you and you can't stay the same.

"I've got some punk influences - the fringe of punk, really. Not Ramones punk. I also like electro like Aphex Twin.

"There's no distinction between genres when I listen to music, because what sounds good to me sounds good to me.

"I draw from what I know, and I'm sure it's the same for the rest of the band. We've got no interest in honing in on any specific style.

"It's not like we're trying to be obscure or anything. I guess MGMT just wants to challenge what's acceptable in music."

"We're so excited to be coming to South Africa," says Goldwasser. "We've wanted to for so long ." LS
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on September 24, 2014, 05:11:01 AM
It's super cute how excited Peru is.  While their are a couple of items in here that aren't presented quite correctly, they aren't actually mistakes.  ;)



 http://www.andina.com.pe/Ingles/noticia-mgmt-set-for-firstever-peru-gig-in-november-524544.aspx (http://www.andina.com.pe/Ingles/noticia-mgmt-set-for-firstever-peru-gig-in-november-524544.aspx)
 
 
18:11. Lima, Sept. 23. United States' foremost psychedelic indie-rock band, MGMT, are coming to Lima this November for performing their first-ever concert in Peru, it was reported Tuesday.

Best known for worldwide famous hits such as "Electric Feel", "Time To Pretend" and "Weekend Wars”, MGMT will be taking to the stage on 4th November at Lima's Parque de la Exposición, the event organizers announced in a press release Thursday.

Along with Benjamin Goldwasser and Matt Asti on guitar and bass; James Richardson, on drums and with their acclaimed lead singer and lyricist Andrew VanWyngarden, the Brooklyn’s outfit confirmed the news via their official facebook.

Thus, they will be playing in front of their Peruvian fans for first time ever joined by Hank Sullivant on guitar and keyboards and Will Berman on percussion and harmonica.

MGMT's Peru show will be part of the band's ongoing world tour, in support of their 3rd self-titled studio album released in September last year.

The upcoming show is organized by Movistar. Tickets for the Nov. 4 concert will be available for Movistar clients ranging from 150 soles to 185 soles while price for general public worth 250 soles.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 21, 2014, 10:02:25 PM
This is meant to be an article about Foxygen, but the author got a bit sidetracked.  I figured it was worthy of a post.
http://www.allvoices.com/article/100001632 (http://www.allvoices.com/article/100001632)

Foxygen’s "...And Star Power" isn't necessarily the album people want, but it’s the album we need.

In early 2013 Foxygen released their breakthrough record “We are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Love and Magic”, a brilliant neo-psychedelic/stoner rock album that brought nostalgia to an era the lead singer Sam France (24) and multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Rado (24) never lived. The two have been playing music together since their early days of high school, making various EP’s which often came out sounding like a pre-pubescent mix of Captain Beefheart meets Guided by Voices. The most prominent of these was “Jurassic Exxplosion Phillipic” an album that has 36 tracks, none of which go over 3:26. In May of 2011 they released “Take the Kids off Broadway”, which was re-released by Jagjaguwar in 2012 as their studio debut (although some will argue “Exxplosion” was their first Full-length). “Broadway” brought the revival of the late 60’s and early 70’s most prolific Rock N’ Roll tenants. Echoes of Mick Jagger, The Doors and Pink Floyd, had they been modern DIY artists, bled through the duos songs. Foxygen’s moderate hype train picked up momentum heading into early 2013 when “21st Century” was released to favorable reviews, and alluring write-ups from some of the world’s biggest music blogs. The band started to develop a sufficient amount of buzz; unfortunately it also came with its negative aspects as it so often does. A now former band member (as well as ex-girlfriend of France) Elizabeth Fey blogged about the bands fractured relationship online. Claiming there was resentment between Rado and France, due to Rado’s predominant behavior, among other things. There also were on-stage meltdowns from France, including one that resulted in a major injury. Yet after a turbulent year the band was able to put things aside. Whether there truly was exhibited tension or whether Fey had developed a bit of a Yoko Ono Syndrome, has stayed ambiguous, but none-the-less the group continued forward and on October 14th released their newest LP. After the success of their prior release the band could’ve gone right for the mainstream, but instead bowed out to take listeners on the transcendental mind fuck that is “…And Star Power”

This wasn't the first time in recent history a band with accessible tunes failed to continue in that trend. Back in 2010 the Neo-Psychedlic/electro-pop duo from Brooklyn MGMT released their sophomore album “Congratulations” to a widely disgruntled and, for a lack of a better word, confused audience. Over the previous two to three years MGMT had exploded onto the music scene with freakishly catchy electro-psych-dance songs. Songs such as “Time to Pretend” and “Kids” were everywhere from motion picture trailers to sports stadiums, from Williamsburg hipsters, to Tempe frat boys. So when the band ditched the sound that made them the most popular buzz band of the late 00’s to become a five piece rock band making a more visceral release then one that appeased the masses, it was bashed by critics and audiences alike. People expected MGMT to follow up with their Grammy nominated sound, but instead they made a self-indulgent “rock” album.

What people failed to realize was that MGMT never intended to be rock stars, there aesthetic while catchy and colorful, were also completely satirical of contemporary pop music. “Congratulations” is an incredibly underrated release; it hasn't exactly reached cult classic level like some people initially thought it might, though it’s still a benchmark in the sense that it showed a popular rock band, signed from their college dorms to Columbia records, could still have integrity. Even with the constant pressure from their label to make more commercially inclined music.

Foxygen’s situation is not nearly as extreme. They haven’t been so universally coveted; they aren't on a major label and though exoteric, probably weren't being played at your local Sigma Chi house last summer. Although they easily could’ve sold-out and made incredibly catchy pop songs. The kind that you'd find  during a montage on some CBS comedy. So instead they differed and went completely bat-shit out of left field. Redeeming that pre-pubescent Neo-Beefheart sound from “Exxplosion”, and by adding bits of Todd Rundgren, Iggy Pop, and The Kinks to the mix you have “…And Star Power”. “Star Power” is a 24 track extravaganza that seems to contain every ounce of material France and Rado have drawn up over the last two years. Upon first listen it’s a bit of a mess. The band holds together quite well for the first five tracks before breaking off into a series of instrumentals that all almost seem like they were demos that never got completed. The grooves are killer, but you wish they would've been a little more anthropomorphic. This happens a few more times, “Hot Summer” has a Carousel ride from hell feel too it, as the band does its best Suicide impression and tracks “Can’t Contextualize My Mind” and “Talk” feel like they were uncompleted cuts for The Stooges during the “Fun House” era. As with arguably every double album, aside from maybe The Rolling Stones “Exile on Main St.”, there are a few straight-up throwaway tracks, “Cold Winter/Freedom” is a terribly un-captivating 6:14 you could do without and there certainly is no need for a mini sequel in “Freedom II”.

Despite a few songs that drag a little beyond necessity and an album that as a whole feels like a Kandinsky painting, there are some absolute gems. “Coulda Been My Love” with its female choir backed harmonies and soothing guitar shriek fills, is the slow dance at a prom in a parallel universe. It’s followed by the brilliant opiate induced love song “Cosmic Vibrations”. The band also has its fair share of high tempo jams as well, “Matress Warehouse” feels like the opening title montage for a seventies buddy cop film and “Brooklyn Police Station” starts out sounding like a Roky Erickson jam that eventually breaks down to a Haight-Ashbury afternoon in the park, where everything seems to be passing you in slow motion. On first listen, or even on the first four listens it is quite overwhelming (it has taken me a week since its initial release to get a firm grasp), but if you give it some time the fluctuation between pop songs and odd instrumentals find a way to coexist.

Much like MGMT’s “difficult” second album, Foxygen will likely not be greeted well by critics, and they will be snubbed by some fans of their previous releases. The album has some disappointing moments, some songs you wish they would've inflated individually rather than the track list itself, but i'd be hard pressed to find a release these days that doesn't. Also “Star Power” serves as an important reminder to music fans that musicians are still willing to make daring pieces of art. With so many artists arriving on the scene at rampant paces audiences can often be overwhelmed, and attention spans can desecrated. In this era it’s quite easy for a band to have one unappealing release and forever fall into a bit of a purgatory. Foxygen’s album is undoubtedly self-indulgent, yet it feels that word is too often looked at with disdain. Self-Indulgence has led to some of our greatest records, “Pet Sounds”, “Kid A”, “In Utero”, David Bowie’s “Berlin” era, the list goes on. It would be hyperbolic to compare “…Star Power” to these classics, but the point is that artists should never shy away from making self -indulgent albums no matter how intense the pressure comes from fans and label heads. Some of the greatest works in audio have been made in that mindset. Foxygen’s France and Rado are two young dudes, both in their early twenties and while the ideas on this album seemed to be pulled from various terrains, they all serve as anticipation to see where this band, who've already been at it for a decade, go next.
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on November 05, 2014, 10:53:20 AM
http://www.peruthisweek.com/news-mgmt-visits-lima-beach-with-peru-surf-champ-104377 (http://www.peruthisweek.com/news-mgmt-visits-lima-beach-with-peru-surf-champ-104377)
(http://e.peruthisweek.e3.pe//ima/0/0/0/2/7/27598/624x468.png)
National

MGMT visits Lima beach with Peru surf champ

Members of MGMT, the U.S. dance-rock duo, know how to select a tour guide.

Band vocalist Andrew VanWyngarden and guitarist James Richardson, whom were in Peru’s capital city to perform Tuesday at Parque de la Exposición, spent a day with Sofia Mulanovich, famed Peruvian surfer and a world champion of the sport.

On Monday, upon her Instagram account, Mulanovich posted a photo of her newfound friends and herself with the caption: “Great day with the boys of MGMT. Good waves, ceviche and a spectacular sunset”.

And really, who could ask for more?

This was the band’s first time in Peru. They were joined onstage Tuesday night by The Drums as well as Delta Venus, an Argentinian band who opened the concert.

Readers, did you go to the November 4 MGMT concert? What did you think?
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on December 26, 2015, 09:42:23 AM
So Andrew tweets and the Internet noticed. My mother used to tell me that it's better to be talked about that ignored. Anyway, NME Had only lovely things to say and are definitely ready to embrace MGMT as their darlings once again.

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MGMT Are Coming Back In 2016: Here's Why You Should Be Excited
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By Lisa Wright
26th December 2015
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Cast your mind back to 2008. The day-glo drug disco of nu rave is slowly starting to wane as three-day come downs with only the ringing sounds of Shitdisco to keep you company start to become a bit less MDMA-zing. Leona Lewis' 'Bleeding Love' is keeping The X Factor's seemingly unstoppable chart dominancy charging ahead. The concept of the viral Youtube smash is in its infancy and 'Gangnam Style', 'Friday' and the 'Harlem Shake' are but evil glints in the internet's eye.

If you were a fan of aspirational, effervescent, psych-tinged pop bangers, however, then 2008 will mainly be remembered as the year of MGMT. The wonky, parping intro to breakthrough hit 'Time To Pretend' was everywhere and debut LP 'Oracular Spectacular' brought Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser storming into the limelight and to the top of NME's Albums of the Year poll.



The duo seemed unstoppable, but it wasn't to be. The more experimental, odd and wickedly underrated offerings of 2010's 'Congratulations' and 2013's self-titled LP failed to ignite the same commercial flame and MGMT seemed relegated to early evening festival billings forevermore.

Yesterday, however, the band sent out a festive tweet teasing a new record in 2016 and showing the kind of self-confidence that suggests the pair aren't content to sit back on the sidelines any more.



Here's what we want from Album Four and why, if they pull it off, a success could be one of 2016's best comebacks.

Pristine pop vs total weirdness


The beauty of MGMT at their finest (see: 'Electric Feel', 'Brian Eno', 'Kids') is that they splice big, bright, shimmering pop sensibilities with the kind of squelching oddness that Syd Barrett might call out as a bit strange. The tracks that haven't resonated so much with fans are the ones where the balance is off, but if Ben and Andrew can find the perfect middle ground then there's few who can match them.

Curveballs


After Nirvana had achieved ridiculous worldwide success with 'Nevermind', Kurt Cobain set about trying to write a record ('In Utero') that was angry and difficult and cast away the fairweather fans. You could argue that MGMT have followed a similar path: after the enormous success of 'Oracular Spectacular', they set about pushing their experimental, idiosyncratic sides forward and letting their psychedelic pool of influences show. MGMT were not content to just be a happy clappy pop band. Now, however, the biggest curveball they could throw would be to come back with an album full of bangers. They've shown they can write trippy, ethereal gems: now let's see the other side of them again.

Influential prowess


From Swim Deep to Yak to Superfood, you can bet that a large number of this generation's young contenders have an MGMT album or two on their record shelves. A return to form record would be not only hugely welcomed, but timely: we're hoping for somewhere in between Swim Deep's sonic collage of a second album 'Mothers' and Tame Impala's warped psych-dance LP 'Currents'.

Well-deserved recognition


Sure, it might seem like we're gunning for 'Oracular Spectacular mk II' here, but that's only 'cos we're a sucker for a pop hook. Realistically, MGMT haven't made a bad album to date. 'Congratulations' was an exciting, eclectic rattle through so many ideas you could barely keep up; 'MGMT' delved into a Pink Floyd-esque nightmare/ fantasy-scape (depending on the track), flitting between monotone drones and space-age synths with barely a pause. Together, the three records form a body of work that's inventive, playful, rule-breaking and downright fun. It'd be a damn shame if the band were remembered mainly as mid-noughties hype success rather than as a group that constantly evolved and reinvented themselves over time. Come on Album Four – let's help the history books out a bit.







 
Read more at http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/mgmt-are-coming-back-in-2016-heres-why-you-should-be-excited?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=mgmt#bpIcabGh2f9giuPF.99 (http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/mgmt-are-coming-back-in-2016-heres-why-you-should-be-excited?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=mgmt#bpIcabGh2f9giuPF.99)
Title: Re: ♫ Your blood is all around you now ♫ (II)
Post by: lala on October 24, 2017, 03:50:02 PM
http://www.dailycal.org/2017/10/17/mgmt-little-dark-age-andrew-vanwyngarden-ben-goldwasser/ (http://www.dailycal.org/2017/10/17/mgmt-little-dark-age-andrew-vanwyngarden-ben-goldwasser/)

MGMT returns after hiatus with gothic-tinged track